Gadget: Bacon Toaster

Bacon Express

The Bacon Express is a toaster that cooks delicious slices of pork instead of bread.

Like your ice cream maker, waffle maker, and popcorn machine, the US$40 Bacon Express is really only capable of one task in the kitchen: cooking bacon.

The vertical heating element has enough capacity for six slices of bacon, and a pair of doors seal the heat, grease, and goodness inside. A dial on the side also lets you adjust cooking times, while a tray at the bottom collects grease drippings so they’re easy to dispose of, or use for other purposes.

Breakfast Multi-grain Waffle

Ingredients

2 cups low-fat buttermilk
1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats
2/3 cup whole wheat flour
2/3 cup all-purpose flour
1/4 cup toasted wheat germ
1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 large eggs
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1 tablespoon canola oil
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 cup maple syrup, warmed
1-1/2 cups sliced Strawberries or blueberries

Method

  1. Mix the buttermilk and oats in a small bowl. Let stand for 15 minutes.
  2. Whisk the whole wheat flour, all-purpose flour, wheat germ, baking powder, baking soda. salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl.
  3. Whisk the eggs, sugar, oil, and vanilla in a medium bowl. Add the buttermilk mixture. Add this mixture to the flour mixture and mix with a rubber spatula just until flour mixture is moistened.
  4. Coat a waffle iron with cooking spray. Heat the iron. Spoon in enough the batter to cover three-quarters of the surface, close the iron, and cook until the waffles are crisp and golden brown, 4 to 5 minutes. Keep the waffles warm in a 200°F (90°C) oven while you finish cooking the remaining batter.
  5. Top with maple syrup and strawberries (or blueberries). One serving is 2 waffles. Wrap any leftover waffles individually in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 2 days or freeze for up to 1 month. Reheat in a toaster or toaster oven.

Makes 8 servings.

Source: Magic Foods

Chart of the Day: Breakfast Makeover with Reduced Sugar


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Process Contaminants in Vegetable Oils and Foods

Glycerol-based process contaminants found in palm oil, but also in other vegetable oils, margarines and some processed foods, raise potential health concerns for average consumers of these foods in all young age groups, and for high consumers in all age groups.

EFSA assessed the risks for public health of the substances: glycidyl fatty acid esters (GE), 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD), and 2-monochloropropanediol (2-MCPD) and their fatty acid esters. The substances form during food processing, in particular, when refining vegetable oils at high temperatures (approx. 200°C).

The highest levels of GE, as well as 3-MCPD and 2-MCPD (including esters) were found in palm oils and palm fats, followed by other oils and fats. For consumers aged three and above, margarines and ‘pastries and cakes’ were the main sources of exposure to all substances.


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Glycidyl fatty acid esters – genotoxic and carcinogenic

EFSA’s expert Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM) considered information on the toxicity of glycidol (the parent compound of GE) for its risk assessment of GE, assuming a complete conversion of the esters into glycidol following ingestion.

Dr Helle Knutsen, Chair of the CONTAM Panel, said: “There is sufficient evidence that glycidol is genotoxic and carcinogenic, therefore the CONTAM Panel did not set a safe level for GE.”

When assessing genotoxic and carcinogenic substances that are unintentionally present in the food chain, EFSA calculates a ‘margin of exposure’ for consumers. In general, the higher the margin of exposure is, the lower the level of concern for consumers.

The Panel concluded that GE is a potential health concern for all younger age groups with average exposures, and for consumers with high exposure in all age groups.

“The exposure to GE of babies consuming solely infant formula is a particular concern as this is up to ten times what would be considered of low concern for public health,” said Dr Knutsen.

The Panel’s review revealed that levels of GE in palm oils and fats halved between 2010 and 2015, due to voluntary measures taken by producers. This has contributed to an important fall in consumer exposure to these substances.

Exposure to 3-MCPD over safe level; insufficient data on 2-MCPD

“We have set a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 0.8 micrograms per kilogram of body weight per day (µg/kg bw/day) for 3-MCPD and its fatty acid esters based on evidence linking this substance to organ damage in animal tests,” explained Dr Knutsen. She added that, “the toxicological information is too limited, however, to set a safe level for 2-MCPD.”

Estimated average and high exposures to 3-MCPD from both forms for young age groups including adolescents (up to 18 years of age) exceed the TDI and are a potential concern for health.

Palm oil is a major contributor to 3-MCPD and 2-MCPD exposure for most individuals. Levels of 3-MCPD and its fatty acid esters in vegetable oils were largely unchanged over the last five years.

Source: European Food Safety Authority


Video: Food Processing Contaminants

Watch video at You Tube (3:39 minutes) . . . . .

Too Much Sitting, too Little Eexercise may Accelerate Biological Aging

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine report that elderly women who sit for more than 10 hours a day with low physical activity have cells that are biologically older by eight years compared to women who are less sedentary.

The study, publishing online January 18 in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found elderly women with less than 40 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day and who remain sedentary for more than 10 hours per day have shorter telomeres — tiny caps found on the ends of DNA strands, like the plastic tips of shoelaces, that protect chromosomes from deterioration and progressively shorten with age.

As a cell ages, its telomeres naturally shorten and fray, but health and lifestyle factors, such as obesity and smoking, may accelerate that process. Shortened telomeres are associated with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and major cancers.

“Our study found cells age faster with a sedentary lifestyle. Chronological age doesn’t always match biological age,” said Aladdin Shadyab, PhD, lead author of the study with the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

Shadyab and his research team believe they are the first to objectively measure how the combination of sedentary time and exercise can impact the aging biomarker.

Nearly 1,500 women, ages 64 to 95, participated in the study. The women are part of the larger Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a national, longitudinal study investigating the determinants of chronic diseases in postmenopausal women. The participants completed questionnaires and wore an accelerometer on their right hip for seven consecutive days during waking and sleeping hours to track their movements.

“We found that women who sat longer did not have shorter telomere length if they exercised for at least 30 minutes a day, the national recommended guideline,” said Shadyab. “Discussions about the benefits of exercise should start when we are young, and physical activity should continue to be part of our daily lives as we get older, even at 80 years old.”

Shadyab said future studies will examine how exercise relates to telomere length in younger populations and in men.

Source: EurekAlert!


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