New Coke with Coffee Launched in the U.S. Nationwide

Peter Pham wrote . . . . . . . . .

The new beverage, Coca-Cola with Coffee brings together the classic cola with rich coffee. Arriving in five variations, Coca-Cola with Coffee will be available in Dark Blend, Caramel and Vanilla. Coca Cola with Coffee Zero Sugar will be available in both Dark Blend and Vanilla.

Each 12-oz can features about 69 mg of caffeine, slightly under the amount of a regular cup of coffee.

Source: Foodbeast

New Perspectives Challenge the Idea that Saturated Fats Cause Heart Disease

In science, sometimes a new perspective can turn our interpretation of the data upside-down, and necessitate a paradigm shift.

There has been, and continues to be, fierce disagreements in nutrition science as to what constitutes a healthy diet. A key controversy is the role of saturated fats in health and disease. Saturated fats are known to increase blood cholesterol levels, and increased blood cholesterol is often observed in people who develop cardiovascular disease.

It has been thought for more than half a century that saturated fats in the diet promote heart disease by increasing blood cholesterol. However, a new model explains why this so-called “diet-heart hypothesis”, which has had a major influence on dietary guidelines, may have an alternative explanation.

In a new article published today in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, three scientists have raised a question that challenges the diet-heart-hypothesis: Why do saturated fats increase blood cholesterol, and why should this be dangerous? After all, saturated fats occur naturally in a wide variety of foods, including breast milk.

“Cholesterol is a critically important molecule for all cells in the body,” explains associate professor Marit Zinöcker, the lead author at Bjørknes University College, Oslo, Norway. “A cell is surrounded by a fluid membrane that controls cell function, and the cells depend on the ability to incorporate a certain amount of cholesterol molecules, so that their membranes don’t become too stiff or too fluid.”

“The basis of the model is that when saturated fats replace polyunsaturated fats in the diet, less cholesterol is needed in the cell membranes,” she explains. The opposite is true when eating more polyunsaturated fatty acids, which include omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. “This is because polyunsaturated fats from the diet enter our cell membranes and make them more fluid. The cells adjust the fluidity of their membranes by incorporating cholesterol recruited from the bloodstream. According to the model presented by the researchers, this can explain why blood cholesterol levels decrease when we eat more polyunsaturated fats.

The authors have named the model the “Homeoviscous Adaptation to Dietary Lipids” (HADL) model.

“Cells need to adjust their membrane fluidity according to changes in their environment, such as the access to different types of fat”, says co-author Simon N. Dankel, researcher at the Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway.

“This phenomenon is called homeoviscous adaptation, and has been described in both microorganisms, vertebrates and in human skin cells. We argue that this is a critical principle in human physiology. Our cells are normally capable of adjusting their cholesterol content according to changes in dietary fats.”

“Nutrition research often focuses on what changes in the body, but the question of why something, such as the blood cholesterol, changes, is of equal importance”, says co-author Karianne Svendsen, postdoctoral fellow at the Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, Norway.

This is where the new HADL model comes into play, providing an explanation based on adaptive human physiology. “From the perspective of the HADL model, we find logical explanations for why cells need to change their cholesterol content, and thereby the blood cholesterol, when fats in the diet change,” says Zinöcker.

In the paper, other reasons for elevated LDL-cholesterol in people with cardiovascular disease are discussed, such as low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. This indicates that elevated blood cholesterol caused by metabolic disruptions must be uncoupled from elevated blood cholesterol caused by a major change in intake of dietary saturated fatty acids. It also questions the benefit of lowering blood cholesterol by adding polyunsaturated fatty acids to the diet, and not addressing the root cause.

“There is at best weak evidence that a high intake of saturated fat causes heart disease,” says Dankel. “The overall data are inconsistent and unconvincing, not to mention the lack of a logical biological and evolutionary explanation.”

“Also, people with metabolic disorders often do not show the expected changes in blood cholesterol when changing their fat intake, suggesting loss of the normal response.”

“The research and reasoning that the HADL model is based on indicates that the effect of dietary fats on blood cholesterol is not a pathogenic response, but rather a completely normal and even healthy adaptation to changes in diet.” Zinöcker concludes.

The authors state that although the model is based on existing knowledge of cellular mechanisms, the model still needs to be verified. The authors therefore urge researchers to discuss the HADL model using #HADLmodel and to test the model.

Source: EurekAlert!

In Pictures: Food of Celebrity Cuisine (名人坊) in Hong Kong

Fine Dining Classic Cantonese Cuisine

The 2020 Michelin 1-star Restaurant

COVID Lockdown Loneliness Linked to More Depressive Symptoms in Older Adults

Loneliness in adults aged 50 and over during the COVID-19 lockdown was linked to worsening depressive and other mental health symptoms, according to a large-scale online study.

Loneliness emerged as a key factor linked to worsening symptoms of depression and anxiety in a study of more than 3,000 people aged 50 or over led by the University of Exeter and King’s College London, and funded by The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre (BRC).

Researchers had access to data going back to 2015 for participants of the PROTECT online study. They also found that a decrease in physical activity since the start of the pandemic was associated with worsening symptoms of depression and anxiety during the pandemic. Other factors included being female and being retired.

Dr Byron Creese, of the University of Exeter Medical School, who led the study, said: “Even before the pandemic, loneliness and physical activity levels were a huge issue in society, particularly among older people. Our study enabled us to compare mental health symptoms before and after COVID-19 in a large group of people aged 50 and over. We found that during lockdown, loneliness and decreased physical activity were associated with more symptoms of poor mental health, especially depression. It’s now crucial that we build on this data to find new ways to mitigate risk of worsening mental health during the pandemic.”

The study found that before the pandemic, lonely people would report an average of two symptoms of depression for at least several days over the previous last two weeks. During lockdown, lonely people reported either an increase in frequency of depressive symptoms, to more than half the days in the two week period, or a new symptom for at least several days in that timeframe. In people who were not lonely, levels of depressive symptoms were unaffected.

PROTECT began in 2011, and has 25,000 participants signed up. Designed to understand the factors involved in healthy ageing, the innovative study combines detailed lifestyle questionnaires with cognitive tests that assess aspects of brain function including memory, judgment and reasoning over time. In May, researchers included a new questionnaire designed to assess the impact of COVID-19 on health and wellbeing. Running from May 13 to June 8, the questionnaire was completed by 3,300 people, of which 1,900 were long-standing PROTECT participants. The study is continuing to run so that longer term outcomes can be assessed.

Zunera Khan, Research Portfolio Lead at Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience said “We’ve found links between loneliness and a drop in physical exercise and worsening mental health symptoms. It should be within our power to find ways of keeping people socially engaged and active. Our online PROTECT platform ultimately aims to find new ways to engage people in their homes, however, technology can only be part of the picture. We need to ensure we can find new ways to help people stay active and social, whether they are online or not.”

Professor Clive Ballard, Executive Dean and Pro-Vice Chancellor of the University of Exeter Medical School, who leads PROTECT, said: “We are only just beginning to learn the impact that COVID-19 is having on the health and wellbeing of older people. For example, the effect of any economic impact may not yet have emerged. Our largescale study will span a number of years, and will help us understand some of the longer-term effects of COVID-19 on mental health and wellbeing, and ultimately, on whether this has any knock-on effect on aspects of ageing, such as brain function and memory. “

The study plans to conduct further analysis on groups at particularly high risk, such as people with cognitive impairment and those with caring roles.

Source: University of Exeter

Honey Glazed Chicken Wings

Ingredients

8 chicken wings
200 ml honey

Marinade

1 tsp white sesames
2 tsps ginger juice
1 stalk spring onion (diced)
1 tsp lemon juice
1 tbsp light soy sauce
2 tbsps dark soy sauce
1 tbsp sugar
1 tbsp cornstarch
ground white pepper
1/8 tsp sesame oil

Method

  1. Rinse the chicken wings.
  2. Mix the marinade ingredients together. Marinate the chicken wings for 1 hour, preferably overnight in a fridge for the best taste.
  3. Preheat an oven to 225°C.
  4. Arrange the chicken wings on a baking tray. Bake for 30 minutes. Turn the chicken wings upside down every 10 minutes to allow even heating. Brush honey at last. Bake until the wings are golden. Serve hot.

Source: Delicacies at the Stage


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