What’s for Dinner?

Japanese Set Meal at Yayoiken (やよい軒) in Tokyo, Japan

The Menu

  • Sukiyaki beef
  • Grilled mackerel
  • Steamed chicken and seaweed
  • Noodles with nuts and Japanese mustard spinach
  • Miso soup
  • Cooked rice

The price of the set meal is 890 yen (tax included).

Egg and Bacon Pie

Ingredients

1 package (14 oz) frozen puff pastry, thawed
1/2 lb back bacon or ham, thinly sliced
8 eggs
3 tbsp green onions or chives, finely chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
1 tbsp water or milk

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F (200°C).
  2. Divide pastry in half. Line one 9-inch quiche dish or pie plate with pastry. Arrange 1/2 of the back bacon or ham over the pastry base.
  3. Break 7 eggs into pie. Break yolks with fork but do not stir yolks and whites together. Sprinkle onion, salt and pepper over eggs and top with remaining back bacon or ham. Cover with pastry.
  4. Beat remaining egg with water and brush over top of pie. Bake in 400°F (200°C) oven for 25 to 30 minutes. Serve hot or cold.

Makes 6 servings.

Source: Manitoba Egg Farmers

How Does Protein Fit in Your Holiday Diet or New Year’s Resolutions?

While some diets load up on protein and other diets dictate protein sources, it can be hard to know what to consume while managing weight or during weight loss.

A new study by Purdue University nutrition scientists shows that eating more protein daily than what is recommended may benefit only a few – those who are actively losing weight by cutting calories or those strength training to build more lean muscle mass. This study also affirms that the recommended dietary allowance, of 0.8 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight per day – or 0.36 grams per pound – is adequate for most people. For example, an adult who weighs 150 pounds should eat 54 grams of protein a day, which could be three ounces of lean meat, three cups of dairy and one ounce of seeds or nuts within a day.

“But here is the hard part for consumers: These findings support that most adults who are consuming adequate amounts of protein may only benefit from moderately higher protein intake when they are purposefully trying to change their body composition such as when dieting or strength training. The results are not meant to encourage everyone to increase their protein intake in general,” said Wayne Campbell, a professor of nutrition science, whose research integrates exercise physiology, geriatrics and nutrition, especially protein.

The study was led by Joshua L. Hudson, Purdue postdoctoral research associate, and it is published in Advances in Nutrition.

“This research uniquely assesses whether adults benefit from consuming more protein than the current recommended dietary allowance,” Hudson said. “This research was not designed to assess whether or not adults would benefit from consuming more protein than they usually consume. This distinction is important because the recommended dietary allowance is the standard against which to assess nutrition adequacy; however, most adults consume more protein than what is recommended.”

When people are in a neutral metabolic state – not losing weight or lifting weights – eating more protein does not influence their body composition any differently, including lean mass, which is consistent with the current recommended dietary allowances being adequate for generally healthy sedentary weight-stable people. This does not include adults with Type 2 diabetes.

“And that is important because there is so much encouragement, advertising and marketing for everyone to eat higher protein diets, and this research supports that, yes, under certain conditions, including strength training and weight loss, moderately more protein may be helpful, but that doesn’t mean more is needed for everybody at all times,” Hudson said.

More than 1,500 nutrition articles were screened across journal databases to identify 18 studies with 22 intervention groups and 981 participants that addressed this topic. The studies were selected based on specific factors including inclusion of healthy adults, protein intake, weight loss and physical activity. The sources of protein evaluated included lean and minimally processed meats, dairy, eggs, nuts, seeds and legumes.

“This research is clinically more important for women and especially older women who are known to typically consume lower amounts of protein and should be maintaining a healthy bodyweight and regularly strength training,” Campbell said.

What do these findings mean for someone watching their weight during the holidays or planning New Year’s resolutions?

“If you are going to start losing weight, don’t cut back across all foods you usually consume, because you’ll inadvertently cut back protein. Instead, work to maintain, or even moderately increase, protein-rich foods. Then, cut back on the carbs and saturated fat-containing foods,” said Campbell, who studies how sources and amounts of protein – which is critical to building muscle mass – may be a part of adopting healthy eating patterns, including the Mediterranean diet and DASH diet.

These findings are in general, and more evaluation is needed to determine effects on age and gender. This research does not apply to elite athletes or people who lost weight with bariatric surgery, nor does it relate to protein supplements.

No external funding was used for this study. Campbell’s lab continues to study the influences of healthy eating patterns and diets with different amounts and sources of protein on changes in body composition and clinical health risk factors.

Source: Purdue University

Lower BMI Means Lower Diabetes Risk, Even among Non-overweight People

Lower body mass index (BMI) is consistently associated with reduced type II diabetes risk, among people with varied family history, genetic risk factors and weight, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Manuel Rivas of Stanford University, and colleagues.

Weight-loss interventions have shown demonstratable benefit for reducing the risk of type II diabetes in high-risk and pre-diabetic individuals but have not been well-studied in people at lower risk of diabetes. In the new study, researchers studied the association between BMI, diabetes family history and genetic risk factors affecting type II diabetes or BMI. They used data on 287,394 unrelated individuals of British ancestry recruited to participate in the UK Biobank from 2006 to 2010 when between the ages of 40 and 69.

Nearly 5% of the participants had a diagnosis of type II diabetes and diabetes prevalence was confirmed to be associated with higher BMI, a family history of type II disease and genetic risk factors. Moreover, a 1 kg/m2 BMI reduction was associated with a 1.37 fold reduction (95% CI 1.12-1.68) in type II diabetes among non-overweight individuals with a BMI of less than 25 and no family history of diabetes, similar to the effect of BMI reduction in obese individuals with a family history (1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.29)

“These findings suggest that all individuals can substantially reduce their type II diabetes risk through weight loss,” the authors say. However they also caution that the results must be taken with a grain of salt since they didn’t study actual weight loss interventions. Although the new analysis “can determine that lower lifetime BMI is protective against diabetes, that does not necessarily imply weight loss later in life, after carrying excess weight for decades, would have the same result,” they say.

Source: Science Daily

Study: Even Light Alcohol Consumption Linked to Higher Cancer Risk

In a study conducted in Japan, even light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with elevated cancer risks. In the study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption.

Although some studies have linked limited alcohol consumption to lower risks of certain types of cancer, even light to moderate consumption has been associated with a higher risk of cancer overall. To study the issue in Japan, Masayoshi Zaitsu, MD, PhD, of The University of Tokyo and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, and his colleagues examined 2005–2016 information from 33 general hospitals throughout Japan. The team examined clinical data on 63,232 patients with cancer and 63,232 controls matched for sex, age, hospital admission date, and admitting hospital. All participants reported their average daily amount of standardized alcohol units and the duration of drinking. (One standardized drink containing 23 grams of ethanol was equivalent to one 180-milliliter cup (6 ounces) of Japanese sake, one 500-milliliter bottle (17 ounces) of beer, one 180-milliliter glass (6 ounces) of wine, or one 60-milliliter cup (2 ounces) of whiskey.

Overall cancer risk appeared to be the lowest at zero alcohol consumption, and there was an almost linear association between cancer risk and alcohol consumption. The association suggested that a light level of drinking at a 10-drink-year point (for example, one drink per day for 10 years or two drinks per day for five years) would increase overall cancer risk by five percent. Those who drank two or fewer drinks per day had an elevated cancer risk regardless of how long they had consumed alcohol. Also, analyses classified by sex, drinking/smoking behaviors, and occupational class mostly showed the same patterns.

The elevated risk appeared to be explained by alcohol-related cancer risk across relatively common sites, including the colorectum, stomach, breast, prostate, and esophagus.

“In Japan, the primary cause of death is cancer,” said Dr. Zaitsu. “Given the current burden of overall cancer incidence, we should further encourage promoting public education about alcohol-related cancer risk.”

Source: Wiley


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