What’s for Dinner?

Home-cooked Japanese Dinner

The Menu

  • Boiled Flounder with Seaweed and Japanese Green
  • Variety of Pickles
  • Miso Soup with Eggplant and Fried-tofu
  • Cooked Rice
Advertisements

Caribbean Seared Tuna

Ingredients

4 tuna steaks, about 6 oz each
3 garlic cloves, chopped
1/2 tsp salt
1/2 tsp cumin
juice of 2 limes, or juice of 1 orange and 1 lime
black and cayenne pepper to taste
2 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil, or as needed

Cuban Garlic-citrus Sauce

3-4 Tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
8 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
1 cup tangerine juice
1/4 cup lime juice
1/2 tsp ground cumin
salt and black pepper, to taste

Method

  1. To make the sauce, gently heat the olive oil with the sliced garlic until the garlic turns light golden (about 30 seconds), then add the remaining ingredients and remove from the heat.
  2. Let cool to room temperature, and taste for seasoning. This keeps and stays delicious for about three days in the refrigerator.
  3. Combine the tuna with the garlic, salt, cumin, lime juice, black and cayenne pepper. Set aside for about 30 minutes.
  4. Remove fish from the marinade and pat dry.
  5. Brush the fish generously with olive oil, then cook quickly either in a skillet or over a charcoal fire, about a minute or two on each side only.
  6. Serve with the sauce spooned over it when hot.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Olives

Chart of the Day: Is Your Workout Working?


Enlarge image . . . . .

Source: American Heart Association

Your Life Span May Be Foretold in Your Heart Beats

Dennis Thompson wrote . . . . . . . . .

Where your resting heart rate goes, so goes your health.

That’s the suggestion of a new study that found older Swedish men with a resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute had a doubled risk of an early death, even though that rate is well within the normal range of 50 to 100 beats per minute.

That increase in risk held for both death from any cause and death linked to heart disease.

What’s more, every additional heart beat per minute increased a person’s overall risk of early death by 3% and their risk of heart disease by 2%.

Based on these results, doctors might want to keep an eye on a person’s resting heart rate, said American Heart Association expert Dr. Vincent Bufalino. A gradual rise in heart rate could mean trouble ahead for your heart health.

“You wouldn’t have thought you’d have that level of impact from a change in your resting heart rate,” said Bufalino, senior vice president and senior medical director of cardiology-AMG at Advocate Health Care in Naperville, Ill.

At the same time, Bufalino said, it’s a “bit of a stretch” to consider resting heart rate as an independent heart health risk factor.

Rather, a rising heart rate probably is a red flag for other well-established heart risk factors, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, cigarette smoking and a family history of heart problems, he explained.

But, “if the heart rate’s higher, it’s going to possibly point you in a direction to be more vigilant with those folks,” Bufalino said.

For this study, researchers led by Dr. Salim Bary Barywani, from Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, tracked about 800 men born in 1943 and living in Sweden.

In 1993, these men filled out questionnaires on their lifestyle and health, and underwent a comprehensive medical exam that included measuring resting heart rate, the study authors said.

Resting heart rate was measured again in 2003 and 2014 for those still alive and willing to take part.

During the 21-year period, about 15% of the original group of men died before their 71st birthday, while about 30% developed cardiovascular disease, the researchers reported.

A resting heart rate of 75 or higher in 1993 was associated with a doubled risk of death or heart disease during the subsequent years, compared with a resting heart rate of 55 or lower, the findings showed.

At the same time, a stable resting heart rate between ages 50 and 60 was associated with a 44% lower risk of heart disease between ages 60 and 70, according to the report published online April 15 in the journal Open Heart.

The researchers noted that because this is an observational study, a true cause-and-effect relationship can’t be established.

Dr. Prashant Vaishnava, a cardiologist at the Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, agreed with Bufalino that resting heart rate is probably an indicator of other heart risk factors.

“It seems as if that’s where attention should continue to be focused rather than on resting heart rate, which can vary due to a whole slew of reasons, frankly,” Vaishnava said. “If I see a patient in that age range with a resting heart rate of 75 beats per minute, I’m not necessarily going to look at that as a risk factor, but I would continue to look at the rest of their risk factor profile.”

Doctors generally tend to look for extremes when checking heart rate, Bufalino said.

“We know as your heart starts to fail, your heart rate goes up for sure,” Bufalino said.

Too slow also isn’t good — a heart rate down in the 40s also can indicate that the heart’s natural pacemaker might be failing, he added.

“The extremes of real slow and real fast, those are well-established markers for us to observe and intervene,” Bufalino said.

Vaishnava said people should probably “take these findings with a grain of salt,” given that the study involved only men and that other factors might have played a role in those who died early.

People who have an elevated resting heart rate can improve it through more aerobic exercise, Bufalino said. They also ought to talk with their doctor about managing other heart health risk factors like high blood pressure and cholesterol.

Source: HealthDay

Study: Drug Reduces Risk of Kidney Failure in People with Diabetes

Amy Jeter Hansen wrote . . . . . . . . .

Canagliflozin, a drug approved to lower glucose levels in diabetic patients, can slow the progression of kidney disease, according to a study co-authored by a Stanford Medicine researcher.

A new landmark clinical trial shows that a drug lowers the risk of kidney failure by a third in people with Type 2 diabetes and kidney disease.

“For the first time in 18 years, we have a therapy for patients with Type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease that decreases kidney failure,” said Kenneth Mahaffey, MD, professor of medicine at the School of Medicine and co-principal investigator of the trial. “Now, patients with diabetes have a promising option to guard against one of the most severe risks of their condition.”

The trial involved 4,401 participants in 34 countries.

The drug, canagliflozin, improves on a nearly two-decades-old therapy that is currently the only treatment approved to protect kidney function in people with Type 2 diabetes. In the trial, canagliflozin also was found to reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events.

Canagliflozin increases the excretion of glucose through the kidneys. It has already been approved by the Food and Drug Administration to lower blood glucose in patients with Type 2 diabetes and to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with Type 2 diabetes and existing heart disease.

A paper describing the findings of the CREDENCE trial was published April 14 in The New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the International Society of Nephrology’s World Congress of Nephrology in Melbourne. Mahaffey, who is director of the Stanford Center for Clinical Research, is the study’s senior author. The lead author is Vlado Perkovic, MBBS, PhD, executive director of The George Institute for Global Health Australia, and a professor of medicine at the University of New South Wales in Sydney.

‘Definitive trial result’

“People with diabetes and kidney disease are at extremely high risk of kidney failure, heart attack, stroke and death,” Perkovic said. “With this definitive trial result, we now have a very effective way to reduce this risk using a once-daily pill.”

Participants in the trial received the best care available for kidney disease under current guidelines, a type of therapy called renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, or RAAS, blockade. In addition, half were randomly selected to receive canagliflozin, while the other half were given a placebo.

The primary results of the study found that participants who took canagliflozin were 30 percent less likely than the placebo group to develop kidney failure or die from either renal failure or cardiovascular disease. Their risk of kidney failure or death from kidney failure was reduced by 34 percent, and the risk of hospitalization for heart failure or death due to cardiac causes decreased by 31 percent.

‘Eagerly sought’ treatment

People with diabetes can develop kidney disease because prolonged high blood sugar harms blood vessels in the kidney. In addition, diabetes often causes high blood pressure, which can stretch and weaken blood vessels in the organ.

For the past two decades, physicians have largely relied on RAAS blockade to prevent the deterioration of kidney function in diabetic patients. Although RAAS blockade lowers blood pressure and delays progression of kidney disease, patients undergoing this treatment remain at a high risk for renal failure and cardiovascular disease, as well as death from these conditions.

Given that the number of people with Type 2 diabetes worldwide is estimated to rise by 20 percent to 510 million in 2030, “a drug like canagliflozin that improves both cardiovascular and renal outcomes has been eagerly sought by both patients with Type 2 diabetes and clinicians caring for them,” Mahaffey said.

Source: Standford School of Medicine


Today’s Comic