Vegetarian Bok Choy and Yam Soup

Ingredients

  • Organic Shanghai Bok Choy
  • Organic Yam
  • Vegetarian Stock

Imgredients of Vegetarian Stock

  • Oyster Mushroom
  • Suey Choy
  • Beansprout
  • Winter Melon (with skin)

The stock was made by steaming the above ingredients with water for over 1 hour.

Hong Kong Style Quick Lunch

Chinese Noodle and Congee Lunch

The Menu

Stir-fried Noodle with Pork

Roast Duck Congee

Boiled Yu Choy with Oyster Sauce

The Congee and Noodle Eatery

Variable Salt Levels in Fast Foods in Six Countries Suggests Opportunities for Salt Reduction

Salt levels vary significantly in the fast foods sold by six major companies in various developed countries, which suggests that technical issues, often cited as barriers to salt reduction initiatives, are not the issue, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

An international team of researchers from Australia, Canada, France, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States looked at data on the salt content of 2124 food items in seven product categories from six companies. The companies were Burger King (known as Hungry Jack’s in Australia), Domino’s Pizza, Kentucky Fried Chicken, McDonald’s, Pizza Hut and Subway. They looked at savoury breakfast items, burgers, chicken products, pizza, salads, sandwiches and french fries.

Too much dietary salt has been linked to higher blood pressure and other adverse health effects. Estimates show that reductions in salt intake could result in a significant reduction in deaths. Several countries, such as the United Kingdom, Ireland, Finland, Japan and others, have embarked upon salt reduction efforts. More recent efforts have been successful with voluntary salt reduction targets in place or labelling for some types of food. However, food companies often cite technical food processing issues as barriers to reducing salt content, stating that new technology and processes are needed to make lower-salt products.

Salt levels in similar foods varied widely between countries, with fast food in Canada and the US containing much higher levels of sodium than in the UK and France. In Canada, McDonald’s Chicken McNuggets contained two and a half times the amount of sodium — 600 mg sodium (1.5 g salt) per 100 g serving compared to 240 mg sodium (0.6 g salt) per 100 g in UK servings.

“We saw marked variability in the reported salt content of products provided by major transnational fast food companies,” writes Dr. Norman Campbell, University of Calgary, with coauthors.

“Canadian companies indicate they have been working to reduce sodium but the high sodium in these foods indicates voluntary efforts aren’t working,” states Dr. Campbell. “These high levels indicate failure of the current government approach that leaves salt reduction solely in the hands of industry. Salt reduction programs need to guide industry and oversee it with targets and timelines for foods, monitoring and evaluation, and stronger regulatory measures if the structured voluntary efforts are not effective.”

The authors write that this is an opportunity for widespread reformulation of products to contain lower levels of salt, a change that could be introduced gradually over several years to minimize consumer backlash.

“Decreasing salt in fast foods would appear to be technically feasible and is likely to produce important gains in population health — the mean salt levels of fast foods are high, and these foods are eaten often,” they conclude.

Source: Canadain Medical Association Journal

Canada’s fast food some of the saltiest in the world ….

Out-of-hand Nut Consumption Associated with Better Diet Quality in Children and Adults

In a study published in Nutrition Research, researchers looked at the association of out-of-hand nut (OOHN) consumption with nutrient intake, diet quality and the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome in both children and adults. Consumers of OOHN, including tree nuts (almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts), had higher intakes of energy, monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats (the good fats) and dietary fiber, and lower intakes of carbohydrates, cholesterol and sodium than non-consumers.

“Adult consumers also had a 19% decreased risk of hypertension and a 21% decreased risk of low high-density lipoprotein (HDL–the good cholesterol) levels—both risk factors for metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease,” stated Carol O’Neil, PhD, MPH, RD, lead author on the paper and Professor at Louisiana State University Agricultural Center.

The study looked at 24,385 individuals aged 2+ years participating in the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES). Intake was from 24-hour recall data and OOHN consumers were defined as those who consumed at least ¼ ounce of nuts per day, solely as nuts and not as part of products (i.e., in breads, cereals and bars.)

According to Dr. O’Neil, “We decided to look at OOHN specifically because this shows an individual’s conscious decision to consume nuts, which may be associated with a desire for a healthier lifestyle.” Interestingly, the percent of OOHN consumers increased with age: 2.1% ± 0.3%, 2.6% ± 0.3%, 6.5% ± 0.5%, and 9.6% ± 0.5% of those aged 2 to 11, 12 to 18, 19 to 50, and 51+ years, respectively. The two latter groups were combined into a single group of consumers aged 19+ years for subsequent analyses.

“In all of the age groups, although energy intake was higher in OOHN consumers than non-consumers, neither weight nor body mass index (BMI) was higher. This suggests that OOHN consumers are better able to balance energy intake with energy output than non-consumers,” stated Dr. O’Neil. This research comes on the heels of another study by the same authors, published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, which showed that tree nut consumers specifically (ages 19+) had lower body weight, as well as lower BMI and waist circumference compared to non-consumers. The mean weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 4.19 pounds, 0.9kg/m2 and 0.83 inches lower in consumers than non-consumers, respectively.

“These new data, along with previous research, show once again that nuts can and should play an important role in a healthy diet,” adds Maureen Ternus, M.S., R.D., Executive Director of the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation (INC NREF). “With current nut consumption well below the recommended 1.5 ounces of nuts per day (in the FDA qualified health claim for nuts and heart disease) people should be encouraged to grab a handful of nuts every day. Eat them as a snack or throw some on yogurt, salad or oatmeal.”

Source: PRWeb

Braised Chinese Deep-Fried Egg Noodle (Yi Mein)

Ingredients

10 oz yi mein
1/2 can straw mushroom
1 oz yellow chive, cut into sections
1½ tbsp crushed dried flounder

Seasoning

1½ cup chicken broth
1 tbsp dark soy sauce
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp sesame oil
dash of pepper

Method

  1. Remove skin and bones of flounder. Deep-fry meat in warm oil over low heat until crispy. Cool and crush into small pieces.
  2. Rinse straw mushroom and cut into halves.
  3. Parboil yi mein with boiling water in a wok until softened. Remove and drain well.
  4. Sauté straw mushroom with 1 tbsp oil in the wok. Add seasoning and bring to a boil. Add yi mein and toss while simmering until the sauce is absorbed. Mix in crushed flounder and cook for 1 minute. Add chives and toss to combine. Remove and serve.

Source: Hong Kong magazine

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