U.S. National Restaurant Association’s “What’s Hot in 2013” Culinary Forecast

The National Restaurant Association’s (NRA) “What’s Hot in 2013” survey of more than 1,800 professional chefs – members of the American Culinary Federation (ACF) – reveals that children’s nutrition and local sourcing will continue to be the hottest trends on restaurant menus. The chefs also said the best ways to address rising food costs is to change menus, adjust plate composition and explore sourcing options.

The top 10 menu trends for 2013 will be:

1. Locally sourced meats and seafood
2. Locally grown produce
3. Healthful kids’ meals
4. Environmental sustainability as a culinary theme
5. Children’s nutrition as a culinary theme
6. New cuts of meat (e.g. Denver steak, pork flat iron, teres major)
7. Hyper-local sourcing (e.g. restaurant gardens)
8. Gluten-free cuisine
9. Sustainable seafood
10. Whole grain items in kids’ meals

“It is encouraging to see that children’s nutrition remains a top priority for chefs and that they continue to put their creativity in healthful kids meals to work on restaurant menus,” said Joy Dubost, Ph.D, R.D., director of Nutrition & Healthy Living for the National Restaurant Association. “We have seen an increasing interest in health and nutrition among consumers over the last several years, and that interest is also extended to children’s menus, which has helped make our Kids LiveWell program so successful.”

“Local sourcing is another macro-trend that will maintain its momentum in the restaurant community in 2013. Whether purchased from local farms or grown in onsite gardens, many chefs make use of seasonal ingredients to showcase on their menus,” Dubost added.

“I am pleased that members of the American Culinary Federation, who took part in the survey, continue to make children’s nutrition a top priority for 2013. Many ACF members are heavily involved in this effort all across the U.S., both in community programs and with Chefs Move to Schools,” said Michael Ty, CEC, AAC, ACF national president. “Making sure that nutritious food is available for children and their families, and for everyone in the U.S., is paramount to the future of foodservice. An emphasis on local sourcing can only further that effort, as chefs revise menus to better serve their customers while dealing with the increased cost of ingredients.”

Rounding out the top 20 hot menu trends for 2013 are:

11. Farm/estate branded items
12. Non-wheat noodles/pasta (e.g. quinoa, rice, buckwheat)
13. Non-traditional fish (e.g. branzino, Arctic char, barramundi)
14. Ethnic-inspired breakfast items (e.g. Chorizo scrambled eggs, coconut milk pancakes)
15. Fruit/vegetable children’s side items
16. Health/nutrition as a culinary theme
17. Half-portions/smaller portions for a smaller price
18. House-made/artisan ice cream
19. Black/forbidden rice
20. Food trucks

Read more ….

Further reading ….

Hold That Mini-Burger: Restaurants Forecast Food For 2013 ….

Pokemon Character Bento

The Charaben

The Characters

Common Blood Pressure Drugs Might Lower Dementia Risk

Older men on beta blockers were less likely to have brain abnormalities in study.

Taking blood pressure drugs known as beta blockers may reduce the risk of brain changes that can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, new research suggests.

“Levels of the Alzheimer lesions were about half or less in persons receiving beta blockers, compared with persons whose hypertension was untreated,” said study author Dr. Lon White, a researcher at the Pacific Health Research and Education Institute in Honolulu. Beta blockers also appeared to reduce the risk of these brain changes more than other blood pressure medications did.

White added a caution, however. “It would be premature to make any specific recommendations for treatment,” he said, such as suggesting people switch to beta blockers only.

Examples of beta blockers are Inderal (propranolol), Tenormin (atenolol) and Lopressor (metoprolol).

“Our findings will need to be examined in other studies before such recommendations could be made,” White said.

The research does support the idea that treating high blood pressure in midlife must be part of the way to prevent late-life cognitive impairment and dementia, he said.

The study is scheduled to be presented in March at the American Academy of Neurology annual meeting in San Diego.

One in eight older American adults has Alzheimer’s, a progressive brain disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia affect memory, thinking and behavior.

In the study, White and colleagues evaluated the autopsies of 774 men who were enrolled in the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study, a community-based study of Japanese-American men who were between the ages of 71 to 93 when the study began. The study was conducted from 1991 through 2012.

Of the men who were autopsied, 610 had had high blood pressure or had been treated with high blood pressure drugs. The men had taken five common types of blood pressure-lowering medicines. White also looked at two subgroups who took two or more medicines in combination, a common practice for lowering blood pressure.

After adjusting for factors such as the men’s age, their blood pressure levels at the study’s start, their test scores and other factors, White found those who took beta blockers as their only blood pressure-lowering drug had fewer brain abnormalities — such as lesions associated with Alzheimer’s — than those who took no hypertension drugs or other types of blood pressure medications.

Those who took beta blockers in combination with other blood pressure-lowering drugs also had fewer brain abnormalities, but the benefit was not as great as in the beta blocker-alone group.

White can’t explain why the beta blockers seem to have a protective effect. “We have no way to attribute the association with fewer brain lesions to any specific underlying mechanism,” he said.

An Alzheimer’s expert discussed the new findings.

“This is an interesting study, and the Honolulu-Asia Aging Study has been a valuable source of information,” said Heather Snyder, senior associate director of medical and scientific relations for the Alzheimer’s Association.

However, she added: “It’s a small study. I would agree it is premature to draw conclusions about treatment.”

Some people with brain lesions, one of the markers used in the study to gauge risk of Alzheimer’s, do not have cognitive changes, she added.

Until more research is in, she said, those who want to reduce their risk of Alzheimer’s disease should maintain a healthy cardiovascular system by eating a good diet and staying physically active.

White will continue his research. The Alzheimer’s Association has given him a grant to continue the study of the brain tissue. He will examine the tissue for signs of changes known to be linked with Alzheimer’s and evaluate which risk factors during life were linked with the brain abnormalities.

Research presented at medical meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

While this study showed an association between beta blockers and a reduced risk of brain changes typical of Alzheimer’s, it did not prove a cause-and-effect link.

Source: healthfinder.gov

Baked Chicken Winglets

Ingredients

8 chicken winglets
potato starch for coating

Seasoning

1 tbsp fresh or frozen finely minced lemongrass
2 tbsp fish sauce
1 tsp dark soy sauce
1 tsp sugar

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 220ºC.
  2. Rinse and wipe dry chicken. Slit the middle of the winglets with a knife between the bones.
  3. Mix seasoning ingredients and rub into the wings. Set aside for at least 20 minutes.
  4. Coat wings with potato starch and arrange them on a baking pan. Bake in oven for 12 to 15 minutes until done. (Instead of baking, fry wings in hot oil for about 10 minutes until cooked.)

Source: Hong Kong magazine

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