Oceana Study Reveals Seafood Fraud Nationwide

From 2010 to 2012, Oceana conducted one of the largest seafood fraud investigations in the world to date, collecting more than 1,200 seafood samples from 674 retail outlets in 21 states to determine if they were honestly labeled.

DNA testing found that one-third (33 percent) of the 1,215 samples analyzed nationwide were mislabeled, according to U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines.

Of the most commonly collected fish types, samples sold as snapper and tuna had the highest mislabeling rates (87 and 59 percent, respectively), with the majority of the samples identified by DNA analysis as something other than what was found on the label. In fact, only seven of the 120 samples of red snapper purchased nationwide were actually red snapper. The other 113 samples were another fish.

The findings demonstrate that a comprehensive and transparent traceability system – one that tracks fish from boat to plate – must be established at the national level. At the same time, increased inspection and testing of our seafood, specifically for mislabeling, and stronger federal and state enforcement of existing laws combatting fraud are needed to reverse these disturbing trends.

Oceana said the government has a responsibility to provide more information about the fish sold in the U.S., as seafood fraud harms not only consumers’ wallets, but also every honest vendor and fisherman cheated in the process–to say nothing of the health of our oceans.

Source: Oceana

What’s for Dinner?

Chinese Szechuan Home-cooked One Soup and Three Dishes Dinner

The Menu

Preserved Vegetables and Mung Bean Vermicelli Soup

Shredded Chicken and Cucumber Cold Dish

Simmered Pork in Hot and Spicy Broth

Stir-fried Mustard Green with Minced Garlic

Kazari Sushi

Crab Maki Sushi

Women’s Iron Intake May Help to Protect against Pre-menstrual Syndrome

Women who reported eating a diet rich in iron were 30 to 40 percent less likely to develop pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) than women who consumed lower amounts, in a study reported this week by researchers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst School of Public Health and Health Sciences and Harvard. It is one of the first to evaluate whether dietary mineral intake is associated with PMS development.

Senior author Elizabeth Bertone-Johnson and others at UMass Amherst, with lead author Patricia Chocano-Bedoya and colleagues at Harvard, assessed mineral intake in approximately 3,000 women in a case-control study nested within the prospective Nurses’ Health Study II. Participants were free from PMS at baseline. Results appear in the early online edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Women in the study completed three food frequency questionnaires over the 10-year study period. After 10 years, 1,057 women were diagnosed with PMS and 1,968 remained free from PMS. Adjusting for calcium intake and other factors, the researchers then compared previous mineral intake reported by the women diagnosed with PMS with that of women who had few or no menstrual symptoms.

“We found that women who consumed the most non-heme iron, the form found primarily in plant foods and in supplements, had a 30 to 40 percent lower risk of developing PMS than women who consumed the lowest amount of non-heme iron,” says Bertone-Johnson. Women in the highest intake group for non-heme iron had a relative risk of PMS of 0.60 compared to women in the lowest intake group.

She adds, “We also saw some indication that high intake of zinc was associated with lower risk. In contrast, we were somewhat surprised to find that women consuming the highest amount of potassium had a higher risk of being diagnosed with PMS than women consuming the lowest amount of potassium. In general, results for minerals from food sources and minerals from supplements were similar.”

Overall, “Our findings need to be replicated in other studies. However, women at risk for PMS should make sure they are meeting the RDA for non-heme iron and zinc.”

“The level of iron intake at which we saw a lower risk of PMS, roughly greater than 20 mg per day, is higher than the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) for iron for premenopausal women, which is 18 mg per day,” Bertone-Johnson says. This amount may be obtained in 1 to 1.5 servings per day of iron-fortified cereal or with supplements.

“However, as high iron intake may have adverse health consequences, women should avoid consuming more than the tolerable upper intake level of 45 mg per day unless otherwise recommended by a physician,” she notes. Iron may be related to PMS because it is involved in producing serotonin, a neurotransmitter that helps to regulate mood, she and colleagues point out.

The unexpected finding of higher PMS risk with high potassium intake, even at levels below current recommendations of 4,700 mg per day, may be related to potassium’s role in regulating fluid balance in the body. It may affect PMS symptoms such as swelling in the extremities and bloating by affecting fluid retention. “More studies of potassium and menstrual symptoms are needed to better understand this,” they say.

“The level of zinc intake at which we saw suggestion of a lower risk of PMS, greater than 15 mg per day, was also higher than current recommendations of 8 mg per day. However, as high zinc intake may also have adverse health consequences, women should avoid consuming more than the tolerable upper intake level of 40 mg per day unless recommended by a physician.”

Intake of other minerals, including magnesium, copper, sodium and manganese were not associated with PMS risk, the authors point out.

Source: University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Roasted Pork Loin

Ingredients

1¾ lb pork loin
4 stalks baby bok choy
2 shallot, minced
2 tsp butter

Glaze

1/4 cup maple sugar
2 tbsp maple syrup
2 tsp soy sauce
2 tbsp minced ginger

Method

  1. Whisk together glaze ingredients.
  2. Rub glaze onto pork and refrigerate overnight.
  3. Preheat oven to 350ºF.
  4. Brown meat on all sides in hot roasting pan over stove top. Transfer to oven and roast 30 to 40 minutes until done.
  5. Heat left over marinade in a small saucepan over medium heat. Simmer until reduced to syrup consistency.
  6. Heat butter in a skillet, sauté shallot for about 1 minute. Stir-fry bok choy until soften and translucent. Remove.
  7. To serve, slice pork into 1/2-inch thick slices and place over bok choy on platter. Drizzle sauce over top. Serve with cooked rice.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Gusto!

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