Baked Stuffed Fish Fillets Rolls

Ingredients

8 small flounder fillets, skin removed
salt
freshly ground black pepper
1¼ tbsp lemon juice
1¼ tbsp chopped parsley, to garnish
lemon slices to garnish

Filling

1½ tbsp soft margarine
4 bacon slices, skin removed, chopped
1 cup mushroom, finely chopped
1 cup fresh whole wheat breadcrumbs
1 cup frozen corn, thawed
1¼ tbsp chopped parsley

Method

  1. Melt the margarine and fry the bacon over moderate heat for 4 to 5 minutes.
  2. Stir in the mushroom and cook for 2 minutes. Remove from heat.
  3. Stir in breadcrumbs, corn, parsley, salt and pepper.
  4. Season the fillets with salt, pepper and lemon juice. Lay them skinned side up, divide the filling between them and roll up. Tie securely with fine twine.
  5. Place the rolled fish in a greased, shallow baking dish. Cover with foil and bake in a preheated 400ºF oven for 20 minutes. Remove strings and garnish with parsley and lemon slices.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Cooking Naturally

Fish and Dishes

The Fish – Japanese Horse Mackerel (マアジ)


Sashimi

Nigiri Sushi

Grilled with Salt

Steamed

Deep-fried with Batter

Carpaccio

2015 Ranking of 50 Fruits and Vegetables Tested for Pesticide Residue

Lower Numbers = More Pesticides

The Dirty Dozen

1 – Apples

2 – Peaches

3 – Nectarines

4 – Strawberries

5 – Grapes

6 – Celery

7 – Spinach

8 – Sweet bell peppers

9 – Cucumbers

10 – Cherry tomatoes

11 – Snap peas – imported

12 – Potatoes

* * * * * * * *

The In-between Dirty and Clean

13 – Hot peppers +

14 – Blueberries – domestic

15 – Lettuce

16 – Kale / collard greens +

17 – Cherries

18 – Plums

19 – Pears

20 – Green beans

21 – Raspberries

22 – Winter squash

23 – Tangerines

24 – Blueberries – imported

25 – Carrots

26 – Summer squash

27 – Broccoli

28 – Snap peas – domestic

29 – Green onions

30 – Bananas

31 – Oranges

32 – Tomatoes

33 – Watermelon

34 – Honeydew melon

35 – Mushrooms

* * * * * * * *

The Clean Fifteen

36 – Sweet potatoes

37 – Cauliflower

38 – Cantaloupe

39 – Grapefruit

40 – Eggplant

41 – Kiwi

42 – Papayas

43 – Mangos

44 – Asparagus

45 – Onions

46 – Sweet peas frozen

47 – Cabbage

48 – Pineapples

49 – Sweet Corn

50 – Avocados

Source: Environmental Working Group


Read more

Executive Summary of EWG’s 2015 Shopper’s Guide to Pesticides in Produce™ . . . . .

Thermometer-like Device Could Help Diagnose Heart Attacks

Diagnosing a heart attack can require multiple tests using expensive equipment. But not everyone has access to such techniques, especially in remote or low-income areas. Now scientists have developed a simple, thermometer-like device that could help doctors diagnose heart attacks with minimal materials and cost. The report on their approach appears in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry.

Sangmin Jeon and colleagues note that one way to tell whether someone has had a heart attack involves measuring the level of a protein called troponin in the person’s blood. The protein’s concentration rises when blood is cut off from the heart, and the muscle is damaged. Today, detecting troponin requires bulky, expensive instruments and is often not practical for point-of-care use or in low-income areas. Yet three-quarters of the deaths related to cardiovascular disease occur in low- and middle-income countries. Early diagnosis could help curb these numbers, so Jeon’s team set out to make a sensitive, more accessible test.

Inspired by the simplicity of alcohol and mercury thermometers, the researchers created a similarly straightforward way to detect troponin. It involves a few easy steps, a glass vial, specialized nanoparticles, a drop of ink and a skinny tube. When human serum with troponin — even at a minute concentration — is mixed with the nanoparticles and put in the vial, the ink climbs up a protruding tube and can be read with the naked eye, just like a thermometer.

Source: American Chemical Society


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