Chocolate with Traditional Japanese Kimono Patterns

These Chocolat de Kissho chocolates were created through a collaboration between pastry chef Tomomi Chiba and fourth-generation Yuzen kimono hand-painted dyeing master Hiorya Yoshikawa.

Baked Sablefish Served with Radish Salsa

Ingredients

1 lb sablefish (black cod), cut into 4 portions
2 tsp grape seed oil
1/4 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

Salsa

2 cups chopped strawberries
1 cup sliced radishes
1 small yellow bell pepper, diced
1 avocado, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and finely chopped
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1/4 tsp salt
juice of 1 lime

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 350ºF (180ºC).
  2. Remove small pin bones along fish with needle nose pliers if they have not been removed for you.
  3. Place fish on parchment paper-lined baking sheet. Rub fish with oil and season with 1/4 tsp salt and black pepper. Bake for 20 minutes, or until fish is flaky and cooked through.
  4. Meanwhile, toss together salsa ingredients in large bowl.
  5. Serve sablefish topped with radish salsa.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Sage magazine

What is Good Quality Sleep? National Sleep Foundation Provides Guidance

The National Sleep Foundation (NSF) recently released the key indicators of good sleep quality, as established by a panel of experts.

Given the precipitous increase in the use of sleep technology devices, the key findings are timely and relevant. This information complements the data these devices provide, helping millions of consumers interpret their sleep patterns. The report comes as the first step in NSF’s effort to spearhead defining the key indicators of good sleep quality. They key determinants of quality sleep are included in a report published in Sleep Health. They include:

  • Sleeping more time while in bed (at least 85 percent of the total time)
  • Falling asleep in 30 minutes or less
  • Waking up no more than once per night; and
  • Being awake for 20 minutes or less after initially falling asleep.

Multiple rounds of consensus voting on the determinants led to the key findings, which have since been endorsed by the American Association of Anatomists, American Academy of Neurology, American Physiological Society, Gerontological Society of America, Human Anatomy and Physiology Society, Society for Research on Biological Rhythms, Society for Research of Human Development, and Society for Women’s Health Research.

Max Hirshkowitz, PhD, DABSM, Chairman of the Board of Directors of the NSF stated, “Millions of Americans are sleep technology users. These devices provide a glimpse into one’s sleep universe, which is otherwise unknown. The National Sleep Foundation’s guidelines on sleep duration, and now quality, make sense of it all—providing consumers with the resources needed to understand their sleep. These efforts help to make sleep science and technology more accessible to the general public that is eager to learn more about its health in bold new ways.”

Notably, NSF’s recent Sleep Health Index® revealed that as many as 27 percent of people take longer than 30 minutes, on average, to fall asleep. With wider use of sleep technology and the context provided by NSF’s guidelines, consumers can better gauge and even improve their sleep. Furthermore, NSF’s recommendations are instrumental to the continued development of such consumer technologies. The report also highlights areas where research is needed to identify and further delineate additional indicators of good sleep quality across age groups.

“In the past, we defined sleep by its negative outcomes including sleep dissatisfaction, which were useful for identifying underlying pathology. Clearly this is not the whole story. With this initiative, we are now on a better course towards defining sleep health,” noted Maurice Ohayon, MD, DSc, PhD, Director of the Stanford Sleep Epidemiology Research Center.

Source: PR Newswire

Even a Little Exercise can Help With Arthritis, Study Says

Older adults with arthritis-related joint pain and stiffness need to keep moving to remain functionally independent. But only 10 percent of older Americans with arthritis in their knees meet federal guidelines of at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week, the researchers said.

However, this Northwestern University study found that doing even about one-third of that amount is still beneficial.

The study involved more than 1,600 adults 49 or older who had arthritic pain or stiffness in their hips, knees or feet.

Those who did a minimum of 45 minutes of moderate activity — such as brisk walking — a week were 80 percent more likely to improve or sustain physical function and gait speed over two years, compared with those who did less activity, the researchers found.

“Even a little activity is better than none,” said study first author Dorothy Dunlop.

“For those older people suffering from arthritis who are minimally active, a 45-minute minimum might feel more realistic,” said Dunlop, a professor of rheumatology and preventive medicine at Northwestern’s School of Medicine in Chicago.

She said the federal guidelines are important because the more you do, the better you’ll feel and the greater the health benefits.

“But even achieving this less rigorous goal will promote the ability to function and may be a feasible starting point for older adults dealing with discomfort in their joints,” Dunlop said in a university news release.

The study was published online recently in the journal Arthritis Care & Research.

Source: HealthDay


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