Gadget: Citrus Cutter

Instead of breaking out a cutting board and knife, this slicer will perfectly portion your oranges, lemons, and limes while retaining all of their delicious juices.

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Video: The Future of Coffee – Robot Baristas

Automation is eliminating jobs for factory workers and Uber drivers. Will your morning fix soon come from a precision caffeine machine? WSJ’s Geoffrey A. Fowler tastes the new robot lattes at San Francisco’s Cafe X.

Watch video at You Tube (2:20 minutes) . . . . .

Anti-inflammatory Diet could Reduce Risk of Bone Loss in Women

Misti Crane wrote . . . . . .

Anti-inflammatory diets – which tend to be high in vegetables, fruits, fish and whole grains – could boost bone health and prevent fractures in some women, a new study suggests.

Researchers examined data from the landmark Women’s Health Initiative to compare levels of inflammatory elements in the diet to bone mineral density and fractures and found new associations between food and bone health. The study, led by Tonya Orchard, an assistant professor of human nutrition at The Ohio State University, appears in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.

Women with the least-inflammatory diets (based on a scoring system called the Dietary Inflammatory Index) lost less bone density during the six-year follow-up period than their peers with the most-inflammatory diets. This was despite the fact that they started off with lower bone density overall.

Furthermore, diets with low inflammatory potential appeared to correspond to lower risk of hip fracture among one subgroup of the study – post-menopausal white women younger than 63.

The findings suggest that women’s bone health could benefit when they choose a diet higher in beneficial fats, plants and whole grains, said Orchard, who is part of Ohio State’s Food Innovation Center.

“This suggests that as women age, healthy diets are impacting their bones,” Orchard said. “I think this gives us yet another reason to support the recommendations for a healthy diet in the Dietary Guidelines for Americans.”

Because the study was observational, it’s not possible to definitively link dietary patterns and bone health and fracture outcomes.

Rebecca Jackson, the study’s senior author and director of Ohio State’s Center for Clinical and Translational Science, said the new findings support a growing body of evidence that factors that increase inflammation can increase osteoporosis risk.

“By looking at the full diet rather than individual nutrients, these data provide a foundation for studying how components of the diet might interact to provide benefit and better inform women’s health and lifestyle choices,” said Jackson, who is national chair of the Women’s Health Initiative steering committee.

Previous studies have connected high levels of inflammatory markers in the blood to bone loss and to fractures in older women and men, which prompted Orchard and her colleagues to wonder what they’d find if they took one more step back – to the dietary choices that contribute to inflammation in the body.

The Dietary Inflammatory Index – developed to assess the quality of diet from maximally to minimally inflammatory based on nutrients consumed – helped them accomplish that. Dietary information as well as data on bone density and fracture were collected from a large group of the participants in the Women’s Health Initiative, the largest study of postmenopausal women’s health undertaken in U.S. history.

Participants in the WHI were 50 to 79 when they enrolled in the study of prevention and control of common diseases impacting older women. Enrollment ran from 1993 to 1998.

For the new analysis – the first of its kind – the research team looked at dietary data from 160,191 women and assigned inflammation scores based on 32 food components that the women reported consuming in the three months prior to their enrollment.

The researchers used bone-mineral-density data from a subset of 10,290 women. Fracture data was collected for the entire study group.

Orchard and her colleagues found a correlation only between high-inflammatory diets and fracture in younger white women in the study. Higher scores were associated with an almost 50 percent larger risk of hip fracture in Caucasian women younger than 63, compared with the risk for women in the group with the lowest inflammatory scores.

“This suggests that a high-quality, less-inflammatory diet may be especially important in reducing hip fracture risk in younger women,” the researchers wrote.

But in the study group overall, more-inflammatory diets were not linked to fracture and – in fact – the researchers found a modestly lower risk of lower-arm and total fracture in women with the highest dietary inflammation scores. One possible explanation included in the study: The women with lower inflammation scores were more physically active as a group and therefore were at a slightly greater risk of falls.

Women with the least-inflammatory diets had lower bone mineral density overall at the start of the study, but lost less bone than their high-inflammation peers, the researchers found. The lower bone density to start could be because women with healthier diets are more likely to be of a smaller build, Orchard said. Larger people have higher bone density to support their larger frames.

“These women with healthier diets didn’t lose bone as quickly as those with high-inflammation diets, and this is important because after menopause women see a drastic loss in bone density that contributes to fractures,” Orchard said.

Source: The Ohio State University

New England-style Pancakes with Quinoa

Ingredients

2 cups red quinoa
2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 cup evaporated cane sugar
2 tablespoons plus 1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder
pinch of salt
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 cups whole milk
4 large eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/2 teaspoon expeller-pressed canola oil
1 cup blueberries
1 cup Greek-style plain or vanilla nonfat yogurt
maple syrup, for serving

Method

  1. Bring a saucepan with 4 cups water and 1 teaspoon salt to a boil. Add the quinoa and stir. Lower the heat to a simmer, cover, and cook until the quinoa is dry and fluffy, about 20 minutes. Let cool.
  2. Combine the flour, sugar, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon in a large bowl. Whisk well to combine. In another large bowl, combine the milk, eggs, vanilla, and canola oil and whisk to combine. Add the dry ingredients to the wet and blend until just combined. Fold in the cooked quinoa, taking care not to overmix. Let the batter rest for at least 1 hour.
  3. Lightly brush the cooking surface of a nonstick pan or griddle with canola oil. Ladle about 1/3 cup of the batter onto the hot pan. Drop 8 to 10 blueberries on top of each pancake. When bubbles form in the batter, flip and cook on the other side until lightly browned. Continue with the remaining batter and blueberries. Serve topped with a dollop of yogurt and maple syrup on the side.

Makes 10 to 12 pancakes

Source: True Food

What’s for Breakfast?

Home-cooked Japanese Breakfast

The Menu

  • Fresh Juice
  • Simmered Pork Belly with Root Vegetables
  • Natto – Fermented Soybeans
  • Pickled Vegetables in Rice Bran
  • Daikon Pickled in Vinegar and Soy Sauce
  • Miso Soup with Seaweed, Leek and Fish Cake
  • Cooked Rice

Today’s Comic