12-ingredients Gilded Ehomaki Sushi

Inside the sushi roll are:

  • Tuna from Oma, Aomori
  • Japanese puffer fish from Hyogo
  • Red sea bream from Nagasaki
  • Longtooth Grouper from Nagasaki
  • Oval squid from Nagasaki
  • Kuruma prawn from Ehime
  • Steamed abalone from Miyazaki
  • Boiled conger eel from Miyazaki
  • Boiled horsehair crab from Hokkaido
  • Salted herring roe from Hokkaido
  • Salmon roe pickled in soy sauce from Hokkaido
  • Raw sea urchin from Hokkaido

The roll is wrapped by a thin sheet of gold leaf.

French-style Casserole with Duck Legs and Pork Belly

Ingredients

4 whole duck legs (about 3 lbs), preferably Moulard
Kosher salt
4 cups duck fat, melted
4 heads of garlic, cloves separated and peeled
2 tbsp whole black peppercorns
6 bay leaves
1 lb fresh garlic and pork sausages (about 4 links)
1 lb Morteau sausages (about 4 links)
1 (8-oz) piece pork belly, scored every 1/2-inch
2 medium yellow onions, cut into large dice
2 medium carrots, cut into large dice
4 sprigs thyme
2 sprigs rosemary
2 (28-oz) cans whole peeled San Marzano tomatoes
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 (750-ml) bottle dry Riesling
3 cups dried tarbais beans
baguette, for serving

Method

  1. On the first day: Heat the oven to 250°F. Rinse the duck legs and pat dry with paper towels. Arrange in a 4-qt Dutch oven and season generously with salt. Pour the duck fat over the legs along with 15 garlic cloves, 1 tablespoon peppercorns, and 3 bay leaves. Transfer the pot to the oven and bake until the duck is very tender, about 3 hours. Remove the pot from the oven and let the duck legs cool. Lift the legs from the fat and reserve 1/4 cup duck fat; save the rest of the fat for another use. Wrap the duck legs in plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight.
  2. On the second day: In an 8-qt Dutch oven, melt the 1/4 cup reserved duck fat over medium-high heat. Unwrap the duck legs and add to the pot, skin side down. Cook the legs until the skin is crisp and golden, about 7 minutes. Remove the duck legs from the pot and transfer to a bowl. Add the pork sausages to the pot, and cook, turning, until golden brown, about 5 minutes. Transfer the sausages to the bowl and return the pot to the heat.
  3. Add the Morteau sausages to the pot and cook, turning, until golden brown, 5 to 6 minutes. Remove the sausages from the pot and transfer to the bowl with the duck legs. Add the pork belly to the pot and cook, turning once, until golden brown on the outside, 8 to 10 minutes. Transfer the belly to the bowl and return the pot to medium heat.
  4. Add the remaining garlic cloves and the onions to the pot and cook, stirring, until soft, about 5 minutes. Stir in the carrots and cook for another 2 minutes. Add the flour and cook, stirring, for 2 minutes more. Tie the remaining 3 bay leaves, the thyme, and rosemary with kitchen twine and add to the pot along with the tomatoes. Return all the meats to the pot and pour in the wine. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the pork belly is tender and the duck legs are falling off the bone, about 2 hours. Using tongs, transfer all of the meat to a bowl and discard the tied herbs. Using an immersion blender or working in batches with a stand blender, blend the vegetables and tomatoes to thicken the sauce and then return the meat to the pot.
  5. Meanwhile, in a large pot of boiling salted water, cook the beans until just tender, about 40 minutes. Drain the beans and then stir into the pot and simmer for another 5 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and let the cassoulet cool. Cover the pot and refrigerate overnight.
  6. On the third day: Remove the cassoulet pot from the refrigerator and heat over low heat until the ingredients are warmed through. Remove the meats from the pot and cut the duck legs in half, the sausages into 1-inch pieces, and the pork belly into 1/2-inch-thick slices. Ladle the stew and beans into bowls, top with some of the meat, and serve with a baguette for soaking up the sauce.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Source: Dominique Ansel

Video: What is Your Nasal Mucus Saying?

It’s peak cold and flu season, and mucus is making many of our lives miserable. But despite being a little icky, phlegm gets a bad rap. This germ-fighting goo contains cells and chemical compounds that help us power through a cold. You can also think of mucus as a traffic light for your health — what turns up in our used tissues can be a useful clue about the inner workings of our immune systems.

Watch video at You Tube (3:04 minutes) . . . . .

In Pictures: Edible Microfood Dishes

Why Certain Noises Really Irritate Some People

Most people can recall a time when a certain sound annoyed them — say when your office mate was repeatedly clicking his pen — but some people find such sounds utterly unbearable. And new research suggests that brain abnormalities may explain why.

People with a disorder called misophonia have an intense hatred of specific sounds, such as chewing, breathing or repeated pen clicking. These triggers can cause an immediate and strong “fight or flight” response in those with the disorder.

“I hope this will reassure sufferers,” the study’s senior author Tim Griffiths said in a news release from Newcastle University.

“I was part of the skeptical community myself until we saw patients in the clinic and understood how strikingly similar the features are,” he added. Griffiths is a professor of cognitive neurology at Newcastle University and University College London in the United Kingdom.

The researchers conducted brain scans of 20 people with misophonia. They also conducted brain scans on 22 healthy people for comparison. Among those with the condition, brain scans showed an abnormality in their emotional control mechanism that puts their brains into overdrive when they hear trigger sounds.

The scans also revealed that brain activity in people with the disorder originates from a different connectivity pattern in the frontal lobe. This area normally suppresses an abnormal reaction to sounds, the study authors explained.

In addition, the researchers found that trigger sounds had physical effects, such as increased heart rate and sweating in people with misophonia.

The findings may help eventually lead to treatments for this condition, said Griffiths. The study may also prompt researchers to look for similar changes in the brain in other disorders associated with “abnormal emotional reactions,” he said.

Study leader Sukhbinder Kumar added that “for many people with misophonia, this will come as welcome news, as for the first time we have demonstrated a difference in brain structure and function in sufferers.” Kumar is also from the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University and University College London.

Kumar said people with this disorder had very similar signs and symptoms. “Yet, the syndrome is not recognized in any of the current clinical diagnostic schemes. This study demonstrates the critical brain changes as further evidence to convince a skeptical medical community that this is a genuine disorder,” he said in the news release.

“My hope is to identify the brain signature of the trigger sounds — those signatures can be used for treatment, such as for neuro-feedback for example, where people can self-regulate their reactions by looking at what kind of brain activity is being produced,” Kumar said.

The findings were published in the journal Current Biology.

Source: HealthDay


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