Korean-style Roasted Pork Belly Wrap

Ingredients

3.3 pounds pork belly, skin on, boneless
cooked rice and lettuce leaves for serving

Poaching Liquid

8 cloves garlic, crushed
7 spring onions or scallions, roughly chopped, roots on
4 1/2-by-1-1/2-inch piece ginger, skin on, roughly sliced
1 onion, peeled and cut into eighths
2 tablespoons dwengjang paste

Pickled Daikon (Moo Sang Che)

6 ounces daikon, julienned into long strips
4-1/2 teaspoons Korean apple vinegar or rice wine vinegar
1-1/2 tablespoons white granulated sugar
1-1/2 teaspoons Korean chili flakes (gochugaru), or to taste
1 small clove garlic, grated
1 teaspoon salt, or to taste

Rub

2 tablespoons Korean soy bean paste (dwengjang)
2 tablespoons honey
1-1/2 tablespoons grated ginger
1 teaspoon Korean chili paste (gochujang)

Bossam Sauce

2 tablespoons Korean soybean paste (dwengjang)
2 teaspoons grated onion
2 teaspoons roasted sesame oil
2 teaspoons roasted sesame seeds
1 teaspoon grated ginger

Method

  1. In a heavy pot, place the pork belly in and all of the ingredients for the poaching liquid and add water to cover. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer until the pork is fully cooked through and very soft, 2 hours.
  2. Remove the pork belly and place on a baking tray lined with foil to let cool. Discard the poaching liquid. Once cooled enough to handle, carefully cut off the skin of the pork and discard.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350ºF/180ºC.
  4. In a medium sized bowl, mix all of the pickling ingredients together and stir to coat the daikon well. Cover and chill for 1 hour before serving.
  5. Mix all of the rub ingredients together into a smooth paste and smear generously all over the top of the skin-side of belly. Place the pork in the oven, rub-side up, and roast the pork until the top is nicely caramelized, about 30 minutes. Additionally you can place the pork under the broiler briefly for a little more char.
  6. Make the bossam sauce by mixing all of the ingredients together well in a small bowl. Set aside.
  7. Once the pork belly is nicely caramelized on top, let rest for 15 minutes in a warm place.
  8. Transfer the pork to a cutting board and thinly slice into two-bite pieces. Serve the pork with the rice, lettuce leaves, bossam sauce and pickled radish. Try eating the pork in this way: Place a lettuce leaf in your hand. Scoop in a spoonful of rice, top with smear of sauce, piece of pork and finish with some pickled radish. Wrap it all up together and take a bite. You’ll love it.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Source: Judy Joo

Infographic: What 100 Calories of Picnic Foods Looks Like

See large image . . . . .

Source: Consumer Reports

Why Yoga, Tai Chi and Meditation Are Good for You

Relax your mind and then consider this: The physical and mental health benefits of pursuits like yoga and meditation begin in your genes, a new review suggests.

The researchers reviewed 18 studies, involving a total of 846 people, to examine how the behavior of genes is affected by yoga, tai chi, meditation and other mind-body interventions.

The conclusion: Such activities reverse molecular reactions in DNA that cause poor health and depression.

“Millions of people around the world already enjoy the health benefits of mind-body interventions like yoga or meditation, but what they perhaps don’t realize is that these benefits begin at a molecular level and can change the way our genetic code goes about its business,” said lead researcher Ivana Buric.

Buric is a doctoral candidate with the Brain, Belief and Behavior Lab at Coventry University in Great Britain.

“These activities are leaving what we call a molecular signature in our cells, which reverses the effect that stress or anxiety would have on the body by changing how our genes are expressed. Put simply, [mind-body interventions] cause the brain to steer our DNA processes along a path which improves our well-being,” Buric said in a university news release.

More study is needed to understand these effects fully and how mind-body interventions compare to other healthy activities and dietary habits, she said.

“But this is an important foundation to build on to help future researchers explore the benefits of increasingly popular mind-body activities,” Buric added.

The findings were published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology.

Source: HealthDay


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