Menu of the Chinese Banquet Honouring the President of China During His Visit to Hong Kong

June 30, 2017

Source: SCMP

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Summer Treat: Rolled Ice Cream Tacos

Forget those classic California taco trucks because one Garden Grove ice cream shop is redefining the ice cream taco with an inspired spin on the classic treat.

Hot on the heels of the rolled ice cream trend in Orange County, Sweet Cup owner Kenny Tran created his own unique take on the craze by inventing new flavors based off of boba tea. Rolled ice cream lent itself well to a boba infusion, as it’s essentially flattened ice cream that can be topped with almost anything before being loosely rolled up, creating unlimited flavor opportunities. Combine that with a colorful custom taco shell, and you’ve got SoCal’s latest Instagram craze.

Served only on Tuesdays, Sweet Cup’s ice cream tacos come in a variety of flavors like s’mores, strawberry shortcake, and since it is 2017, matcha and charcoal black coconut topped with edible gold. If you want to stick with the status quo, order the Monster Inc., a bright turquoise taco filled with crushed chocolate chip cookie and Oreo ice cream, then topped off with whipped cream, a drizzle of chocolate, and of course, a fresh cookie. If you’re looking to stick with the viral unicorn trend, go for the Rainbow Road: a bright pink taco shell loaded with Fruity Pebbles ice cream, rainbow sour straws, and obviously, rainbow sprinkles.

Watch video at Thrillist (1:35 minutes) . . . . .

Roasted Spicy Cauliflower

Ingredients

2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon coriander seeds
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
1 teaspoon curry powder
1 teaspoon turmeric powder
1 large head cauliflower, cored, broken into 1-inch florets
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon finely grated peeled ginger
1 teaspoon finely grated lime zest

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 450°.
  2. Stir oil, coriander seeds, cumin seeds, curry, and turmeric in a large bowl to combine.
  3. Add cauliflower and season with salt and pepper. Toss to coat cauliflower evenly.
  4. Arrange in a single layer on a large rimmed baking sheet (scrape any extra seasoning from bowl over cauliflower). Roast until cauliflower is brown around edges and crisp-tender, 10–15 minutes.
  5. Transfer to a platter and sprinkle ginger and lime zest over. Serve warm or room temperature.

Makes 8 servings.

Source: Bon Appetit magazine

A Chef Explains Why You Should Buy the Ugliest Produce at A Farmers Market

Talia Lakritz wrote . . . . . .

Chef Nina Clemente is a fan of farmer’s markets. She credits the inspiration from locally-sourced ingredients for launching her career and continues to rely on seasonal bounty to create masterful dishes at The Smile’s Di Alba in Los Angeles.

When Clemente is perusing the farmers’ stands, she doesn’t look for the most pristine fruits and vegetables. Instead, she said that imperfect produce actually provides the best flavors.

“We seek perfection in produce. And in farmer’s markets, if you go you’ll notice that there will be some funny formed fruits and vegetables, maybe some bruises, and typically those things are incredibly flavorful and sweet,” she told us.

For the most delicious fresh ingredients, she advises taking advantage of the discounted damaged goods at farmer’s markets. They might not look pretty, but they’re guaranteed to be bursting with incredible flavors that grocery stores just can’t compete with.

“Don’t look for perfection, because the fruit that’s a little softer is the stuff that’s going to be the sweetest,” said Clemente.

Source: Business Insider

Why Does Acupuncture Work?

The use of acupuncture to treat pain dates back to the earliest recorded history in China. Despite centuries of acupuncture, it’s still not clear why this method of applying and stimulating tiny needles at certain points on the body can relieve pain. Recent studies have raised additional questions, with some finding acupuncture reduced chronic pain while others showed that acupuncture has little, if any, impact on pain.

A new study from LA BioMed researchers offers some answers for why acupuncture may help and why clinical trials have produced mixed results. The researchers found the proper use of acupuncture (with the reinforcement method or coupled with heat, which is often used in acupuncture treatments) can lead to elevated levels of nitric oxide in the skin at the “acupoints” where the needles were inserted and manipulated. They noted that nitric oxide increases blood flow and encourages the release of analgesic or sensitizing substances, which causes the skin to feel warmer and contributes to the beneficial effects of the therapies.

“Our lab has developed a painless, non-invasive biocapture device that can sample human biomolecules over specific skin regions,” said Sheng-Xing Ma, MD, PhD, an LA BioMed lead researcher and corresponding author of the study published in Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Volume 2017. “With this tool, we were able to obtain the first evidence that nitric oxide is released from the human skin surface at a higher level with the proper acupuncture methodology and the use of heat.”

Dr. Ma said several acupuncture clinical trials by conventional researchers have produced negative results, finding little difference in pain relief between the use of acupuncture and “sham acupuncture,” in which needles are manufactured and/or inserted unsystematically. He said these studies have puzzled the acupuncture community and led many to question whether the proper acupuncture methodologies were used.

For the latest study, the LA BioMed researchers used a low force and rate/reinforcement method of acupuncture. They gently inserted acupuncture needles into the skin of 25 men and women, aged 18-60 years, and delicately twisted the needles for two minutes or until they achieved a sensation of “de qi” (soreness, numbness, distension or pain). They then manipulated the needles using gentle amplitude and moderate speed for two minutes every five minutes for a total of 20 minutes.

They also applied electrical heat for 20 minutes and found elevated levels of nitric oxide at the acupoints. To further validate their findings, they conducted the test with high-frequency and force, which is known as a reduction method, and found nitric oxide levels over the areas of the skin region were reduced.

Dr. Ma said his team will continue to explore the differences in these two acupuncture techniques to determine the effectiveness of each in pain relief and better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved.

“Based on traditional Chinese medicine, acupuncture reinforcement is attained by slowly twisting or rotating the needle with gentle force or by heat,” Dr. Ma said. “Reduction is attained by rapidly twisting or rotating the needle with great force. Reinforcement results in local feeling of warmness, but reduction causes a local feeling of coldness.”

Source: EurekAlert!