Opinion: 7 nutrition trends you’ll see in 2018

Christy Brissette wrote . . . . . . .

Last year was all about plant protein, sprouted foods and healthy fats. My prediction is that 2018 will be focused on eating to prevent and manage health conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease and boosting digestive health.

This year’s Food & Nutrition Conference & Expo was held in Chicago and brought more than 13,000 nutrition professionals together to learn about food and nutrition research and innovation.

Here are the top food and nutrition trends you’ll see in the year ahead.

Omega-9s

Why it’s a trend: Healthy fats are in, and in 2018 we’ll home in on omega-9s (also known as monounsaturated fats) for their potential to regulate blood sugar levels and promote a healthy weight.

Where you’ll see it: Algae has been touted as a superfood in its own right, but the newest use for algae is in the production of ­omega-9 cooking oil. The process doesn’t use genetically modified organisms or chemical extraction, further broadening its appeal. Thrive algae oil is high in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and low in saturated fats. It has a high smoke point of 485 degrees, which means you can use it in baking, roasting and sauteing.

So what does algae oil taste like? It’s completely neutral and odorless, so you can use it in any recipes where you want healthy fat without changing the flavor of the food.

Plant-based probiotics

Why it’s a trend: Probiotics have been a hot topic in the nutrition world for several years. They’re bacteria that provide health benefits such as better digestion and a stronger immune system. With plant-based eating becoming increasingly popular, people are looking for probiotic sources beyond yogurt and kefir.

Where you’ll see it: GoodBelly dairy-free probiotics come in tasty shots, juice, infused drinks and bars so you can get your daily dose of good bacteria any way you like. All GoodBelly offerings feature bacteria strain Lp299v, which has been scientifically proved to survive stomach acid and arrive safely in the intestines, where it can colonize in the gut. In other words, these probiotics go beyond “live and active cultures” — they survive and thrive to give you health benefits.

Chicory root fiber

Why it’s a trend: It’s fantastic to introduce healthy bacteria into your digestive tract, but you also need to provide the right fuel to help those good bacteria thrive. That’s where prebiotics come in.

Chicory root fibers (inulin and oligofructose) are the only scientifically proven plant-based prebiotics with proven health benefits such as weight management, improved calcium absorption and digestive health.

Where you’ll see it: Expect to find chicory root fiber in a variety of foods, including nutrition bars (ThinkThin), yogurt (Oikos Triple Zero), smoothies and oatmeal. You can also find it as a powder (Prebiotin) that can be added to your food and beverages.

Eating for ‘Type 3’ diabetes

Why it’s a trend: Alzheimer’s disease is now being referred to as “Type 3 diabetes” and “brain diabetes,” as both conditions involve insulin resistance and deficiency. In 2018, we’ll be focusing more on the importance of eating for brain health.

Where you’ll see it: A randomized control trial of the MIND (Mediterranean-DASH intervention for neurodegenerative delay) diet is looking into the benefits of a nutrient-rich diet emphasizing foods such as green leafy vegetables, nuts and berries in preventing Alzheimer’s disease. Frozen blueberries are being given to participants because they are rich in antioxidants that may be beneficial for the brain, particularly when it comes to memory loss in aging.

Recent research published in the European Journal of Nutrition found that daily consumption of the equivalent of one cup of fresh blueberries, given as 24 grams of freeze-dried blueberry powder, showed positive changes in cognitive function in older adults over a placebo.

Expect to see blueberry powder as a supplement and blueberries being used to create condiments and sauces in savory as well as sweet dishes.

Pseudograins made convenient

Why it’s a trend: Getting healthy whole grains on the table has always been a challenge because of longer cooking times. That’s why food companies are coming up with ways to bring us whole grains and pseudograins (seeds that are served as grains) much more quickly.

Where you’ll see it: Fast and portable amaranth, buckwheat and quinoa in single portions such as Ellyndale Q Cups in low-sodium flavors like Savory Garlic & Mushroom. They’re ready in five minutes; just add boiling water and steep and you’re ready to eat.

Stevia 2.0

Why it’s a trend: Stevia continues to rule as the sweetener of choice for people wanting to cut down on sugar or calories. As the demand for stevia grows, so do the product offerings.

Where you’ll see it: Look for stevia as an ingredient in more beverages, baking mixes and condiments as consumers look for calorie- and sugar-reduced versions of their favorites.

Stevia will be mixed with brown sugar, cane sugar and honey by companies such as Truvia to make lower-sugar and lower-calorie options. Because these stevia products are naturally sweeter than sugar, you need to use only half the amount.

Cottage cheese, the new Greek yogurt

Why it’s a trend: Cottage cheese used to be only for dieters because it was seen as plain and, let’s face it, lumpy. Now it’s becoming more popular because we’re all obsessed with finding more ways to pack protein into our meals and snacks. This cousin to Greek yogurt is slightly higher in protein and is mostly casein, a protein that can help you feel full longer.

Where you’ll see it: Brands such as Muuna make cottage cheese with a texture that melts in your mouth and is sweetened with real fruit and no artificial flavors. Plus it’s low in sugar, with only four grams in the plain version.

Source : The Washington Post

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Smoky Sea Bass with Spicy Tomato Ketchup

Ingredients

4 fillets of line-caught sea bass, about 3-1/2 oz each
2 tbsp olive oil, plus extra to drizzle
sea salt and black pepper
hickory essence, for brushing
piece of butter
4 baby bok choy, halved lengthwise

Spicy Tomato Ketchup

1 lb 2oz vine-ripened tomatoes
scant 1/2 cup superfine sugar
1 tsp white peppercorns
2 tsp sea salt
olive oil, to drizzle
3 garlic cloves, peeled and sliced small bunch of basil
2 cups tomato juice
few dashes of Tabasco sauce
sea salt and black pepper

(Makes about 1-3/4 cups)

Method

  1. To make the ketchup, preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C).
  2. Roughly chop the tomatoes and toss them in a large bowl with the sugar, peppercorns, salt, and a drizzle of olive oil.
  3. Spread the tomatoes out in a casserole dish and drizzle with some more olive oil. Bake for about 1 hour, stirring the mixture once or twice until the tomatoes are soft and slightly caramelized.
  4. Add the garlic slices, basil, and tomato juice and give the mixture a stir. Return to the oven for another 30 minutes.
  5. Transfer the tomato mixture to a blender or food processor and whiz to a fine puree. Pass through a fine strainer into a pan and bring to a boil. Let the mixture bubble until it has thickened and reduced by a third.
  6. Add the Tabasco and adjust the seasoning, adding salt and pepper to taste. Let cool completely, then transfer to a sterilized jar. Keep chilled and use within a week or two.
  7. Check the sea bass fillets for pin bones, removing any you find with tweezers.
  8. Rub a little olive oil over the sea bass fillets, then season well with salt and pepper. If using the cedar wood (cardboard-thin about 4 by 8 inches), brush one side with Hickory essence. Bend it over so that the opposite sides meet, to resemble a book. then punch one or two holes along the sides using a paper hole puncher. Place each sea bass fillet on one side of the cedar and fold the cedar around it. Secure the wood by tying two pieces of twine or kitchen string around the punched holes.
  9. Repeat for the remaining sea bass fillets. (If you’re not using cedar wood, you can simply brush a bamboo steamer with hickory essence, though the steamer will retain a smoky aroma even after washing.) Set aside and keep warm.
  10. Bring some water to a boil in a steamer. Slide the sea bass parcels onto the steamer rack (or into the bamboo steamer) and cover with the lid. Steam for 6 to 8 minutes until the fish is opaque and just cooked through.
  11. In the meantime, heat the 2 tbsp olive oil with the butter in a skillet and saute the bok choy until tender.
  12. To serve, place a sauteed baby bok choy, a spoonful of ketchup on each warm serving plate. For an impressive presentation, bring the sea bass parcels to the table and cut the twine to reveal the steamed fillets. Otherwise, transfer the fish fillets to the plates. Serve hot.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Gordon Ramsay’s Maze

The Best Diet for 2018

Dennis Thompson wrote . . . . . . . .

Your New Year’s resolution diet should be based on a well-balanced eating plan that fits your lifestyle, rather than a weird fad replete with food restrictions.

That’s according to U.S. News & World Report’s best diet rankings for 2018. The two diets that tied for the top spot — the Mediterranean Diet and the DASH Diet — fit that bill because they feature real food and reasonable, flexible guidelines, experts said.

“It’s tasty, it’s sensible, nutritionally sound, and there’s great research that it can help ward off or control a whole host of chronic diseases,” Angela Haupt, assistant managing editor of health at U.S. News & World Report, said of the Mediterranean Diet.

On the other hand, you should avoid fad diets that require you to adopt severe restrictions. The hot new Keto Diet got a raspberry from the U.S. News’ panel of nutrition experts, tying for last on the list.

The Keto Diet requires people to severely restrict their carbohydrate intake while indulging in high-fat foods, a plan that is simply not sustainable, Haupt said.

“It really is the diet of the moment, but it can be a pretty extreme plan. There’s a very strict carb limit. Our experts say it’s not necessary to be so extreme or restrictive,” Haupt said.

“One expert said if a diet recommends snacking on bacon, you can’t take it seriously as a health-promoting way to eat,” Haupt said.

The rankings come from an expert panel of the country’s top nutritionists, dietary consultants and physicians, which evaluated 40 different diets across nine categories. The categories included ease of compliance, likelihood of short- and long-term weight loss, and effectiveness against chronic conditions like heart disease and diabetes.

Both the DASH and Mediterranean diets allow people the flexibility to choose from a wide variety of healthy foods, so they can eat what best suits them, said Kelly Hogan, clinical nutrition and wellness manager of the Mount Sinai Hospital’s Dubin Breast Center in New York City.

The diets share a number of similar themes, Hogan said — lots of colorful fruits and vegetables, whole grains, healthy fats, lean proteins, low-fat dairy, and avoidance of foods that are processed, packaged or high in saturated fats.

“The DASH and Mediterranean diets are not excluding any foods or food groups or restricting anything,” Hogan said. “I think that’s really important when it comes to how a normal person eats in general.”

The diets also are both backed by a lot of scientific data that show they can help people lose weight and avoid heart disease and diabetes, Haupt said.

“There’s a lack of good solid research on nutrition and diets in general, so it says something when a plan like the Mediterranean Diet is backed up with good solid research,” Haupt said.

Fads like the Keto Diet can cause quick weight loss, but a person can’t maintain such eating restrictions, Haupt and Hogan noted.

“These diets are so restrictive that of course you’re going to lose weight fast because you’re not eating enough calories to sustain basic activities of your body, let alone any exercise. That’s nothing that any person can sustain for the long term,” Hogan said. “The weight’s going to come back if you do lose any weight, and then it’s going to be harder to lose weight in the future.”

Weight Watchers scored high in the U.S. News rankings, coming in first as the best commercial diet and the best weight-loss diet.

“Weight Watchers offers the flexibility to shape your own diet,” Haupt said. “You have to stick to guidelines about how much you’re consuming every day, but what does that look like? You can eat what you want. There are no foods that are off-limits.”

The plan also benefited from the amount of encouragement and accountability Weight Watchers provides its members, Haupt added.

“We know that having that support, having people to talk to and staying accountable to a plan is really important,” Haupt said.

Hogan said Weight Watchers is great for people who’ve never really taken stock of their regular eating patterns.

“For someone who is just starting to pay more attention to what they’re eating, something like a Weight Watchers can be helpful for them to start to understand things like that,” Hogan said.

But she believes that people need to move on and find their own path eventually, after learning what they can from a commercial plan.

“What I don’t like about any commercial diet is that the focus is not on your actual food choices,” Hogan said. “It’s about calories or points or numbers, and that really takes away from your ability to be in tune with your hunger cues and your fullness cues and what you’re really craving. If we become more in tune with those things, we naturally consume how much the body needs. Paying too much attention to numbers takes away from that.”

Dieters who want to succeed long-term need to take a hard look at themselves and what’s important to them, Haupt and Hogan said.

“If you are somebody who loves restaurants, don’t pick a plan that makes you toil at home over the stove,” Haupt said. “If you like wine and you select a plan that completely forbids it, that makes it that much more likely that you won’t be able to last on that diet.”

In general, dieters ought to focus more on the positives of food rather than the negatives, Hogan concluded.

“My hope this year will be a focus on what you should eat rather than what you shouldn’t eat,” Hogan said. “There’s no one food that most people can’t eat. We should focus on what we need more of and nourish our bodies that way.”

Source: HealthDay


Read also:

U.S. News Reveals Best Diets Rankings for 2018 . . . . .

Shrimp Burgers

Japanese-style Shrimp Burger with Plum Sauce

Chinese-style Shrimp Burger with Chili Sauce

The burgers are available from Lotteria stores in Japan for a limited time period.

Both burgers are sold for 420 yen each (tax included).

Deadly E. coli Outbreak of Romaine Lettuce in Canada and the U.S.

Since mid-November, dozens of people have become ill and two people have died in Canada and the U.S. due to infection with E. coli 0157:H7, which has been linked in this country to contaminated romaine lettuce. Here is a primer on E. coli and what consumers can do to avoid becoming sick:

What is E. coli?

Escherichia coli bacteria normally live in the intestines of healthy people and animals and are typically harmless. But infection with the O157:H7 strain, which produces a shiga toxin, can cause severe abdominal cramps, bloody diarrhea and vomiting.

Healthy adults usually recover within a week, but young children and older adults have an increased risk of developing a life-threatening type of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome.

How does contamination occur?

E. coli can be shed in the feces of cattle, poultry and other animals, polluting water used to irrigate crops and the soil where fruits and vegetables are grown. Leafy greens, such as lettuce and spinach, can become contaminated during and after harvest from handling, storing and being transported. An individual infected with E. coli also can transmit it to other people.

“This strain of E. coli causes more outbreaks than all other strains combined, so it’s the big problem,” said Herb Schellhorn, a microbiologist at McMaster University in Hamilton, who specializes in the study of E. coli and other water- and food-borne pathogens.

What’s the source of this outbreak?

A Canadian Food Inspection Agency-led investigation has determined that romaine lettuce is at the heart of the E. coli outbreak in five eastern provinces, but the source of the produce has not yet been identified. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has concluded the E. coli involved in 17 cases in 13 states has a closely related genetic signature as the strain behind Canada’s 41 cases, but has not confirmed the food source. One person in Canada and one in the U.S. have died.

“This time of year, most of our lettuce will come from southern places … so if it’s affecting both countries, it may be from California or Mexico or other countries that produce romaine lettuce,” said Schellhorn. “But it also can be contaminated during the processing by individuals who are infected or if there was fecal contamination introduced at some point in the distribution (process).”

He said the longer it takes to pin down the source of adulteration, the more difficult it will become over time, given that romaine is a perishable item.

“It’s not like it’s frozen and we can go into meat lockers and test food materials for contamination. Depending on how it was contaminated, if it was in one large place and it’s the water that was contaminated, that could have implications for other food materials that might have been exposed.”

While that “doesn’t appear to be the case” with this outbreak, Schellhorn said E. coli. 0157:H7 is highly infectious and exposure to only a very small amount can cause disease.

What can consumers do?

The Public Health Agency of Canada says on its website that thoroughly washing potentially contaminated romaine lettuce — or any other fresh produce — in water can remove the bacteria.

But Schellhorn suggests it’s better to be safe than sorry.

Not only does he advise not purchasing romaine lettuce currently on grocery store shelves, he suggests consumers toss out any they have in the fridge.

“It’s not worth taking a chance … Lettuce isn’t that expensive, it has a short shelf life anyway,” he said.

“I think I would just throw it out.”

Source: CBC