New Food on the Menu

Freak Shakes from Baskin-Robbins in the U.S.

Donut Shop Freak Shake

Oreo ‘n Cookies Freak Shake

Unicorn Freak Shake

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Quick, Easy and Simple Heart-healthy Roasted Fish Dish with Salsa

Ingredients

4 (4-oz) trout fillets
canola oil cooking spray
juice of 1 lemon (about 3 tbsp)
1 tbsp canola oil
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
2 lemons, whole

Salsa

1 mango, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1 medium avocado, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch cubes
1/2 red onion, diced
1 tbsp lime juice
1 tbsp canola oil
1 tsp chili pepper powder
2 tbsp cilantro, chopped

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F (190°C).
  2. Spray a 9- x 9-inch roasting pan or baking sheet with the canola oil spray. Place fillets inside and coat them with lemon juice, canola oil and pepper.
  3. Slice whole lemons into thin rounds, and remove seeds from each slice. Distribute slices equally among trout fillets.
  4. Roast fillets for 15-20 minutes, depending on thickness of fillets. Fish should be translucent and flakes easily when pulled apart.
  5. To make the salsa, place salsa ingredients in a small mixing bowl and mix to combine. Salsa will keep in the refrigerator for two to three days.
  6. Serve fish with salsa.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Heart & Stroke Canada

In Pictures: Food of Norca in Ottawa, Canada

Canadian Cuisine

The Restaurant

Healthy Nutrition for Healthy Teeth

Daily brushing with fluoride toothpaste and flossing are essential to a healthy smile, but did you know nutrition has an effect on your dental health, too?

Eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups promotes healthy teeth and gums. A balanced diet of fruits, vegetables, protein foods, calcium-rich foods and whole grains provides essential nutrients for optimum oral health as well as overall health.

Foods for Optimum Oral Health

  • Calcium-rich foods, such as low-fat or fat-free milk, yogurt and cheese, fortified soy drinks and tofu, canned salmon, almonds and dark green leafy vegetables help promote strong teeth and bones.
  • Phosphorus, found in eggs, fish, lean meat, dairy, nuts and beans is good for strong teeth.
  • Vitamin C promotes gum health, so eat plenty of citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, broccoli, potatoes and spinach.

Smart snacking also can keep your mouth in good shape. Resist the urge to snack frequently — the more often you eat, especially between meals, the more likely you are to introduce acid attacks on your teeth. If you do snack, choose wisely. Forgo sugary treats such as hard or sticky candy and opt for nutritious choices such as raw vegetables, fruits, plain yogurt and popcorn. Remember to brush after snacking to keep cavities at bay. If you can’t brush, rinse your mouth with water to get rid of food particles.

Caring for a baby? Avoid pacifying your infant, toddler or young child with a bottle of juice, formula or milk. Sucking on the bottle bathes the teeth and gums in liquid which can contribute to tooth decay.

In addition to healthful eating, oral health problems can be prevented by practicing good oral hygiene, such as brushing teeth with fluoridated toothpaste twice a day, flossing once a day, drinking fluoridated water and seeking regular oral health care.

Source: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Multivitamins Do Not Promote Cardiovascular Health

Taking multivitamin and mineral supplements does not prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death, according to a new analysis of 18 studies published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, an American Heart Association journal.

“We meticulously evaluated the body of scientific evidence,” said study lead author Joonseok Kim, M.D., assistant professor of cardiology in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. “We found no clinical benefit of multivitamin and mineral use to prevent heart attacks, strokes or cardiovascular death.”

The research team performed a “meta-analysis,” putting together the results from 18 individual published studies, including randomized controlled trials and prospective cohort studies, totaling more than 2 million participants and having an average of 12 years of follow-up. They found no association between taking multivitamin and mineral supplements and a lower risk of death from cardiovascular diseases.

“It has been exceptionally difficult to convince people, including nutritional researchers, to acknowledge that multivitamin and mineral supplements don’t prevent cardiovascular diseases,” said Kim. “I hope our study findings help decrease the hype around multivitamin and mineral supplements and encourage people to use proven methods to reduce their risk of cardiovascular diseases – such as eating more fruits and vegetables, exercising and avoiding tobacco.”

According to the United States Food and Drug Administration, unlike drugs, there are no provisions in the law for the agency to “approve” dietary supplements for safety or effectiveness before they reach the consumer, nor can the product’s label make health claims to diagnose, cure, mitigate, treat or prevent a disease. As many as 30 percent of Americans use multivitamin and mineral supplements, with the global nutritional supplement industry expected to reach $278 billion by 2024.

Controversy about the effectiveness of multivitamin and mineral supplements to prevent cardiovascular diseases has been going on for years, despite numerous well-conducted research studies suggesting they don’t help. The authors set out to combine the results from previously published scientific studies to help clarify the topic.

“Although multivitamin and mineral supplements taken in moderation rarely cause direct harm, we urge people to protect their heart health by understanding their individual risk for heart disease and stroke and working with a healthcare provider to create a plan that uses proven measures to reduce risk. These include a heart-healthy diet, exercise, tobacco cessation, controlling blood pressure and unhealthy cholesterol levels, and when needed, medical treatment,” Kim said.

The American Heart Association does not recommend using multivitamin or mineral supplements to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

“Eat a healthy diet for a healthy heart and a long, healthy life,” said Eduardo Sanchez, M.D., the American Heart Association’s chief medical officer for prevention and chief of the Association’s Centers for Health Metrics and Evaluation, who was not a part of this study. “There’s just no substitute for a balanced, nutritious diet with more fruits and vegetables that limits excess calories, saturated fat, trans fat, sodium, sugar and dietary cholesterol.”

Source: American Heart Association


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