Oreo Mooncakes

Now available in Singapore to celebrate the Mid-autumn Festival on September 24, 2018

Four flavours – Brownie Chocolate, Double Chocolate With Milk, Custard & Pineapple-Flavoured Jam, and Strawberry Jam

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Oven-cooked Beef Pot Roast

Ingredients

one 4-pound boneless beef chuck roast
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
2 tablespoons olive oil
2 yellow onions, chopped
12 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
1 cup dry red wine
4 cups reduced-sodium beef broth, or as needed
4 large sprigs of fresh thyme
1 sprig of fresh rosemary
1-1/2 pounds fingerling potatoes, halved lengthwise
12 ounces cherry tomatoes (preferably assorted colors)
3/4 cup pitted green olives

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 350ºF.
  2. Pat the beef dry with paper towels. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Heat a large Dutch oven (at least 6 quarts) over medium-high heat. Add the olive oil, then add the beef and cook, turning occasionally, for about 12 minutes, or until browned on all sides. Transfer the beef to a bowl.
  4. Reduce the heat to medium, add the onions to the pot, and cook, stirring occasionally and scraping up the brown bits on the bottom of the pot with a wooden spoon,for about 5 minutes, or until the onions are tender.
  5. Stir in the garlic and cook for about 1 minute, or until fragrant.
  6. Stir in the wine, bring to a boil, and boil for 1 minute.
  7. Stir in the broth, thyme, and rosemary.
  8. Return the beef to the pot and scatter the potatoes, tomatoes, and olives around it. You should have enough liquid to cover all but about the top 1 inch of the beef. Add broth or water if needed. Bring to a simmer over high heat, cover tightly. T
  9. Move the pot to the oven. Bake for about 2 hours and 30 minutes, turning the beef over after the first 1-1/2 hours, or until it is just tender. Uncover and continue baking for about 30 minutes, or until the beef is fork-tender.
  10. Remove from oven and set aside to rest for 30 minutes.
  11. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the beef, vegetables, and olives to a platter. Gently pull the beef into large chunks along its natural separations. Cover the beef, vegetables, and olives with aluminum foil to keep warm.
  12. Skim off the fat that has risen to the surface of the cooking liquid and remove and discard the herb stems. Bring the liquid to a boil and boil for about 20 minutes, or until slightly reduced.
  13. Return the beef, vegetables, and olives to the pot and simmer for about 5 minutes, or just until reheated.
  14. Divide the beef, vegetables, and olives among six dinner plates. Spoon a few tablespoons of the cooking liquid over each serving. Pour the remaining cooking liquid into a sauceboat. Serve hot, with the cooking liquid on the side.

Makes 6 servings.

Source: Curtis Stone What’s for Dinner?

In Pictures: Some Less Familiar but Delicious Mexican Food

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Chapulines

Chinese AI System Could Predict Diabetes 15 Years in Advance

Alice Shen wrote . . . . . . .

Doctors at a hospital in Shanghai are hoping a new artificial intelligence system will help them to identify patients at risk of developing diabetes up to 15 years in advance.

In tests the model, known as Ruining Knows Sugar, or Ruining Zhitang in Chinese, achieved an accuracy rate of 88 per cent, according to 4 Paradigm, the Beijing-based company that developed the software and which has been working with medical staff at Ruijin Hospital in Shanghai since last year.

According to Tu Weiwei, a machine learning specialist at the tech company, the system was designed to identify those most at risk of developing type 2 diabetes – the most common form of the chronic disease – within the next three years.

It also gave risk forecasts for the next nine and 15 years as a reference, he said.

Ning Guang, a specialist in metabolic diseases and vice-president of Ruijin Hospital, said the new system used medical information from 170,000 individuals from across the country, some of whom had diabetes and others who did not.

The data, which was collected between 2010 and 2013 by the hospital’s diabetes research team, included gender, height, weight, blood sugar levels, smoking and drinking history, and education levels, he said.

The AI algorithm then used that information to make its predictions and “learned” from the results, Ning said.

Diabetes is one of the world’s most common and costly chronic illnesses, affecting one in 11 adults globally.

The ratio in China is similar, at about 10 per cent, but given the huge size of its population that means the country had about 110 million diabetes patients in 2016, according to figures from the International Diabetes Federation and World Health Organisation.

The prevalence of the disease had put a huge strain on China’s medical resources, Ning said.

“If the trend continues, we will need 100,000 more doctors,” he said.

Xu Aimin, a University of Hong Kong professor specialising in diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, said that early diagnosis of diabetes was key to providing timely treatment, prolonging lives and reducing the financial burden the disease has on the country.

“Without concerted action, the incidence is likely to increase,” he said. “Diabetes is not curable, but it can be prevented.”

Xu said also that type 2 diabetes was closely related to obesity and that people could reduce their risk of developing it by making healthy lifestyle choices.

The use of artificial intelligence to help predict and monitor diabetes is growing.

In June, American medical device company Medtronic, working with IBM Waston Health, released its Sugar.IQ app, which evaluates how a user’s blood sugar levels respond to variables such as food intake, insulin dosing and other daily routines.

Source : SCMP

Many Seniors Who Take Xanax, Valium Become Drug-dependent

When older people use drugs like Valium or Xanax to calm anxiety or help them sleep, they run a high risk of becoming drug-dependent, new research suggests.

In the study of almost 600 adults averaging 78 years of age, about one in four who were prescribed these types of benzodiazepine sedatives ended up using them for at least a year.

That’s despite warnings against long-term use of the drugs, especially among older people. Benzodiazepines — a class that also includes Ativan, Halcion and Klonopin — can raise the risk of car crashes, falls, broken hips and other harmful side effects, experts warn.

So the new study “shows that we need to help providers start with the end in mind when prescribing a benzodiazepine, by beginning with a short-duration prescription and engage patients in discussions of when to reevaluate their symptoms and begin tapering the patient off,” said lead author Dr. Lauren Gerlach. She’s a geriatric psychiatrist at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.

“We also need to educate providers about effective non-pharmaceutical treatment alternatives, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, for these patients,” Gerlach said in a university news release.

One psychiatrist called the study a much-needed reminder for doctors.

“Clinicians, including psychiatrists, continue to prescribe benzodiazepines to this [older] population at an alarming rate,” said Dr. Brian Keefe, medical director at Zucker Hillside Hospital in Glen Oaks, N.Y.

However, “multiple studies over many years now have consistently demonstrated an elevated risk of falls, and falls with fracture in seniors who take these medications, a risk that increases with daily dose,” said Keefe, who wasn’t involved in the new research.

In the study, Gerlach’s team tracked benzodiazepine use among 576 older adults who were given their first prescription between 2008 and 2016. Only a few had had any psychiatric, psychological or psychosocial care in the past two years, the report noted.

Overall, 152 of the patients maintained a current or recent prescription one year after being initially prescribed a benzodiazepine, the study found.

The study mostly included people who got their prescription from a primary care doctor or other non-psychiatrist physician, because that’s how most older patients get benzodiazepines, the authors explained.

Breaking the numbers down, Gerlach’s team found that white patients were four times more likely to use these drugs over the long term, compared to minority patients.

Also, people whose initial prescriptions were written for the largest number of pills were more likely to become long-term users. In fact, for every 10 additional days of drugs prescribed, the risk of long-term use nearly doubled over the next year, the researchers reported.

And compared to short-term users, patients who took benzodiazepines long term were not any more likely be diagnosed with anxiety or depression — two conditions that might justify using these drugs long term, Gerlach said.

Long-term users were more likely to say they had sleep problems, however, even though benzodiazepines are not recommended for long-term use as sleep aids. In fact, they may even worsen sleep the longer they’re used, the researchers said.

“Since mental health providers see only a very small minority of older adults who have mental health issues, we need to support primary care providers better as they manage these patients’ care,” Gerlach said. “We must help them think critically about how certain prescriptions they write could increase the chance of long-term use.”

So why do so many physicians renew prescriptions, even when it’s not justified?

Keefe had one theory. “Tapering and ultimately stopping these medications can be uncomfortable for both parties,” he said. So, a reluctance to do so “may result in continuation of the status quo, even when it’s not advisable over the longer term,” Keefe believes.

Dr. Harshal Kirane directs addiction services at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City. He called benzodiazepine overuse “a silent epidemic.”

The new study “highlights a staggering rift between guidelines and real-world practices,” Kirane said, and “underscores a persistent reliance on narcotic medications for resolution of symptoms, such as insomnia, that can be improved by numerous other healthier options.”

Kirane said physicians must do more to help guide patients with sleeplessness or other complaints towards safer, non-pharmaceutical solutions.

The report was published online in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

Source: HealthDay


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