New Burger from McDonalds in Japan

Moon Light Burger (月光バーガー)

The burger will be available for a limited time period for 490 yen (tax included).

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Poppyseed Cheesecake

Ingredients

Base

100 g bulghur
1 tablespoon clear honey
25 g butter

Filling

4 tablespoons double cream
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
100 g ground black poppyseeds
250 g thick honey
1 tablespoon brandy
5 eggs, separated
750 g Mizithra, Ricotta, or low-fat soft cheese
50 g flour

Topping

100 g ground black poppyseeds
2 tablespoons brown sugar
50 g butter
1 tablespoon brandy
1 tablespoon cornstarch

Method

  1. Line the base of a 23-cm springform or loose-bottomed tin with greaseproof paper, and grease the sides.
  2. Rinse the bulghur in water, squeezing it to remove excess moisture. Put it into a saucepan with the rest of the ingredients. Add 4 tablespoons water and bring to a boil, stirring until all the liquid has been absorbed.
  3. Spread the mixture evenly over the base of the tin and allow to cool while you make the filling.
  4. Put the double cream, cinnamon, poppyseeds and honey into a saucepan. Bring to the boil, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens.
  5. Add the brandy and remove from the heat. Allow to cool.
  6. When it is cold, beat in the egg yolks, flour and cheese. Whisk the egg whites until stiff, then fold them into the mixture. Turn the mixture into the tin and bake it in a preheated moderate oven (180°C/350°F) for 45 minutes.
  7. Increase the heat to hot oven (220°C/425°F), and bake for 10 minutes or until the cake is firm in the centre.
  8. Remove the cake from the oven and let it cool at room temperature while you prepare the topping.
  9. Combine the topping ingredients and stir them over a low heat until the butter melts and the mixture thickens.
  10. Pour mixture over the cake, then return the cake to the oven and bake for 10 minutes.
  11. Remove from oven, cool and chill before serving.

Makes 10 to 12 servings.

Source: Cheesecakes

New Desserts for the Autumn and Winter Seasons at the Ginza Cozy Corner in Japan

Parfaits

All three sweets are sold for 980 yen (tax included) each.

What Time Is It in Your Body?

Marla Paul wrote . . . . . . . . .

The first simple blood test to identify your body’s precise internal time clock as compared to the external time has been developed by Northwestern Medicine scientists.

The test, TimeSignature – which requires only two blood draws – can tell physicians and researchers the time in your body despite the time in the external world. For instance, even if it’s 8 a.m. in the external world, it might be 6 a.m. in your body.

“This is a much more precise and sophisticated measurement than identifying whether you are a morning lark or an night owl,” said lead author Rosemary Braun, assistant professor of preventive medicine (biostatistics) at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “We can assess a person’s biological clock to within 1.5 hours.

“Various groups have tried to get at internal circadian time from a blood test, but nothing has been as accurate or as easy to use as TimeSignature,” Braun said.

Previously, measurements this precise could only be achieved through a costly and laborious process of taking samples every hour over a span of multiple hours.

The paper was published in the journal PNAS.

Processes in nearly every tissue and organ system in the body are orchestrated by an internal biological clock, which directs circadian rhythm, such as the sleep-wake cycle. Some individuals’ internal clocks are in sync with external time but and others are out of sync and considered misaligned.

The new test for the first time will offer researchers the opportunity to easily examine the impact of misaligned circadian clocks in a range of diseases from heart disease to diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. When the blood test eventually becomes clinically available, it also will provide doctors with a measurement of an individual’s internal biological clock to guide medication dosing at the most effective time for his or her body.

The software and algorithm are available for free to other researchers so they can assess physiological time in a person’s body. Northwestern has filed for a patent on the blood test.

“This is really an integral part of personalized medicine,” said coauthor Dr. Phyllis Zee, chief of sleep medicine in neurology at Feinberg and a Northwestern Medicine neurologist. “So many drugs have optimal times for dosing. Knowing what time it is in your body is critical to getting the most effective benefits. The best time for you to take the blood pressure drug or the chemotherapy or radiation may be different from somebody else.”

Zee also is the Benjamin and Virginia T. Boshes Professor of Neurology.

The test measures 40 different gene expression markers in the blood and can be taken any time of day, regardless of whether the patient had a good night’s sleep or was up all night with a baby. It is based on an algorithm developed by Braun and colleagues by drawing subjects’ blood every two hours and examining which genes were higher or lower at certain times of day. Scientists also used gene expression data from studies conducted at four other centers.

The scientists then developed a novel machine-learning method that was used to train a computer to predict the time of day based on patterns in these gene expression measurements. Out of about 20,000 genes measured, these 40 emerged with the strongest signal.

“Timing is everything,” said study coauthor Ravi Allada, a professor of neurobiology at Northwestern’s Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. “We know if you have disruption of your internal clock, it can predispose you to a range of diseases. Virtually every tissue and organ system are governed by circadian rhythm.

“Before we didn’t have a clinically feasible way of assessing the clock in healthy people and people with disease. Now we can see if a disrupted clock correlates with various diseases and, more importantly, if it can predict who is going to get sick.?”

A link between circadian misalignment and diabetes, obesity, depression, heart disease and asthma has been identified in preclinical research by scientist Joe Bass, chief of endocrinology, metabolism and molecular medicine at Feinberg.

Down the road, Zee envisions improving health and treating disease by aligning people’s circadian clocks that are out of sync with external time.

“Circadian timing is a modifiable risk factor for improving cognitive health, but if we can’t measure it, it’s difficult to know if we’ve made the right diagnosis,” Zee said. “Now we can measure it just like a lipid level.”

The paper is titled “A Universal Method for Robust Detection of Circadian State from Gene Expression.” Other Northwestern coauthors include William L. Kath of the McCormick School of Engineering and Sabra M. Abbott and Kathryn J. Reid of Feinberg.

Source : Northweatern University

Scientists Identify Hormone Link Between Diabetes and Hypertension

Physician researchers with The Ohio State University College of Medicine at the Wexner Medical Center say increased levels of the hormone aldosterone, already associated with hypertension, can play a significant role in the development of diabetes, particularly among certain racial groups.

“This research is an important step toward finding new ways to prevent a major chronic disease,” said Dr. K. Craig Kent, dean of the College of Medicine. “This shows how our diabetes and metabolism scientists are focused on creating a world without diabetes.”

Results of this study were published online today by the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“Aldosterone is produced by the adrenal gland. We’ve known for some time that it increases blood pressure. We’ve recently learned it also increases insulin resistance in muscle and impairs insulin secretion from the pancreas. Both actions increase a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, but the question was – how much,” said Dr. Joshua J. Joseph, lead investigator and an endocrinologist at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center.

Joseph and his team followed 1,600 people across diverse populations for 10 years as part of the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. They found, overall, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes more than doubled for people who had higher levels of aldosterone, compared to participants with lower levels of the hormone. In certain ethnicities, the effect was even greater. African Americans with high aldosterone levels have almost a three-fold increased risk. Chinese Americans with high aldosterone are 10 times more likely to develop diabetes.

“I looked into this as a promise to my father. He had high levels of aldosterone that contributed to his hypertension, and he thought it also might be linked to his diabetes. As my career progressed, I had the opportunity to research it, and we did find a link to diabetes,” Joseph said.

One question that remains is why there are wide differences in risk among various ethnic groups. Joseph said it could be genetics or differences in salt sensitivity or something else, and it needs further study.

Just over 30 million Americans have diabetes and nearly a fourth of them don’t know it, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Another one in three Americans has prediabetes. Despite current preventive efforts, the numbers continue to climb among various racial/ethnic groups.

Next, Joseph will lead a federally funded clinical trial at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center to evaluate the role of aldosterone in glucose metabolism. African American participants who have prediabetes will take medication to lower their aldosterone levels. Researchers will study the impact on blood glucose and insulin in those individuals.

“We know there’s a relationship between aldosterone and type 2 diabetes. Now we need to determine thresholds that will guide clinical care and the best medication for treatment,” Joseph said.

He expects to start enrolling patients in that trial later this year.

Source: The Ohio State University


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