Side Effects of Apple Cider Vinegar

Timothy Huzar wrote . . . . . . . . .

Research suggests that apple cider vinegar may have several health benefits. However, consuming too much vinegar can cause unwanted effects.

Apple cider vinegar is a common ingredient in food dressings, flavorings, and preservatives. It is also becoming popular as a home remedy for a number of health issues.

According to a 2016 review, several studies indicate that vinegar, including apple cider vinegar, have the potential to help treat a range of conditions, including obesity, heart disease, cancer, and bacterial infections.

However, there is little research on the most healthful way to consume vinegar and how much to take.

In particular, very few studies have explored the potential side effects or complications of regularly consuming vinegar.

In this article, we discuss possible adverse effects of using apple cider vinegar as a remedy and give some tips about how to do it safely.

Tooth decay

Like all vinegar, apple cider vinegar is acidic. Consuming too many acidic foods and beverages can weaken tooth enamel over time, potentially leading to tooth decay.

At first, people may not realize that their tooth enamel is damaged. As the damage worsens, the teeth may start to ache or become sensitive to sweet foods and hot or cold temperatures, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Eventually, the teeth may develop cavities that require fillings.

The risk of tooth decay is highest when a person regularly consumes undiluted apple cider vinegar. Diluting the vinegar or consuming it as part of a meal reduces this risk.

Low potassium

According to Dr. Robert H. Shmerling, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medicine School in Boston, MA, there have been reports of apple cider vinegar causing or worsening low potassium levels.

The medical name for low potassium is hypokalemia. A person with mild hypokalemia may not have any symptoms. However, moderate or severe hypokalemia can cause muscle weakness and paralysis, which can affect many parts of the body.

If a person experiences muscle problems, especially issues relating to the heart or breathing, they should seek medical attention immediately.

Blood sugar regulation

Some research suggests that consuming vinegar can affect how the body regulates blood sugar levels. However, scientists do not fully understand this effect and more research is needed.

Anyone with diabetes should speak to a medical professional before trying a high-vinegar diet.

Gastrointestinal issues

Many people recommend vinegar as a natural weight loss aid. Research suggests that it helps slows the rate at which food leaves the stomach, which can suppress the appetite by making a person feel fuller for longer.

However, keeping food in the stomach can cause unwanted side effects. In a study that investigated the potential for vinegar to control the appetite, many participants reported feelings of nausea and indigestion after drinking vinegar with breakfast.

Because of the acidity, drinking undiluted apple cider vinegar can also worsen symptoms in people with digestive problems, such as stomach ulcers or acid reflux.

Skin burns

The acidity of vinegar means that applying it directly to the skin can cause burns and irritation, especially if the vinegar is undiluted.

The National Capital Poison Center lists a number of medical reports in which people experienced serious burns that required medical treatment after using vinegar, including apple cider vinegar, on the skin.

A report in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology describes a case in which a teenager sustained chemical burns on her nose after applying apple cider vinegar to remove two moles.

Tips for safe usage

A person is more likely to experience side effects if they regularly consume large quantities of undiluted vinegar or leave it on the skin for long periods.

To lower the risk of unwanted effects, try:

  • reducing the quantity of vinegar consumed
  • reducing the amount of time that vinegar touches the skin
  • diluting the vinegar with water or using it as an ingredient
  • limiting contact with the teeth, such as by drinking the vinegar through a straw

A 2016 review found that people may be able to achieve many of the potential health benefits by drinking around 15 milliliters of vinegar a day or any quantity that contains around 750 milligrams of acetic acid.

However, because of the lack of research into side effects and long-term safety, further moderation may be the best approach.

People with digestive issues, low potassium levels, or diabetes should consider speaking to a doctor before consuming apple cider vinegar.

Anyone who experiences severe side effects should consult a medical professional.

Source: Medical News Today

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Roasted Pineapple with Raspberry Sauce

Ingredients

1 pineapple
1/3 cup rum
1/4 cup firmly packed brown sugar
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
6 mint sprigs

Raspberry Sauce

2 fresh raspberries or frozen sweetened raspberries, thawed
1/2 cup water
3/4 tablespoon lemon juice
1-1/2 tablespoons sugar

Method

  1. To make the sauce, in a blender or food processor, process the raspberries with the water. Place a fine-mesh sieve over a small bowl and strain to remove the seeds. Add the lemon juice and sugar and stir until the sugar dissolves. Fresh raspberries may need additional sugar. Serve now, or refrigerate in a tightly covered container for up to 5 days.
  2. Preheat an oven to 400°F (200°C). Coat a glass 13 x 9-inch (33 x 23-cm) baking pan with nonstick cooking spray.
  3. Peel, quarter, and core the pineapple. Cut each quarter lengthwise into thirds and then crosswise in half into spears.
  4. Place the spears into the prepared pan. Sprinkle with the rum, brown sugar and nutmeg. Stir and toss to coat the pineapple evenly.
  5. Bake, stirring every 10 minutes, until the pineapple is tender and the pan juices have mostly evaporated, about 30 minutes.
  6. To serve, place an equal amount of the sauce on individual plates. Top with an equal number of the pineapple spears. Garnish with a mint sprig.

Makes 6 servings.

Source: Mayo Clinic

In Pictures: Food of New French Restaurants in Japan

Look to Your Aunts, Uncles and Parents for Clues to Your Longevity

Your chances of inheriting genes linked to longevity are highest if you come from a family with many long-lived members, researchers say.

And that includes aunts and uncles, not just parents.

Using databases at the University of Utah and in the Dutch province of Zeeland, investigators analyzed the genealogies of nearly 315,000 people from over 20,000 families dating back to 1740.

“We observed . . . the more long-lived relatives you have, the lower your hazard of dying at any point in life,” said study lead author Niels van den Berg. He is a doctoral student in molecular epidemiology at Leiden University in the Netherlands.

“For example, someone whose parents are both ‘top survivors’ has a 31 percent lower hazard of dying than someone of the same age without such parents,” van den Berg said in a University of Utah news release.

“Top survivors” refers to people in the top 10 percent age-wise of a group of people born within a given time period.

“Moreover, that person’s hazard of dying is reduced, even if the parents themselves did not live to be extremely old but aunts and uncles were among the top survivors,” van den Berg said.

“In long-lived families, parents can therefore pass on longevity genes to their children, even if external factors prohibited them from reaching the top survivors,” he explained.

The findings reinforce the idea that “there really are longevity genes to be discovered in humans,” van den Berg said.

The study was published online in the journal Nature Communications.

Researchers have long searched for genes associated with longevity, but those genes have been much more difficult to pinpoint than genes for disease, said study co-author Eline Slagboom, a professor of molecular epidemiology at Leiden University.

“This research has led us to be far stricter in selecting the people in whom you have to look for those genes,” Slagboom said.

“If you investigate a random group of people aged over 100, however exceptional they may be, it’s highly likely that many of them do not in fact belong to a family in which longevity is heritable,” Slagboom said. “Their age is probably a matter of chance, the result of a healthy lifestyle or healthy circumstances, for example during childhood, and isn’t therefore reflected in their DNA.”

Source: HealthDay

Your Heart Needs a Minimum 6-hour Sleep Per Night to Stay Healthy

Six hours: That’s the minimum amount of sleep per night you need to help your heart stay healthy, new research suggests.

The study found that chronic lack of sleep and poor sleep quality raise the odds of fatty plaque accumulation in arteries — a condition known as atherosclerosis, which increases the odds of heart attack and stroke.

There are many ways to fight heart disease, including “pharmaceuticals, physical activity and diet,” said lead researcher Jose Ordovas. “But this study emphasizes we have to include sleep as one of the weapons we use to fight heart disease — a factor we are compromising every day.”

Ordovas is an investigator at the National Center for Cardiovascular Research in Madrid, Spain.

In the new research, his team used coronary ultrasound and CT scans to track the artery health of nearly 4,000 Spanish adults. The study participants, average age 46, did not have heart disease at the beginning of the study.

The study couldn’t prove cause and effect, but people who slept less than six hours a night were 27 percent more likely to have body-wide atherosclerosis than those who slept seven to eight hours a night, Ordovas and his colleagues reported.

Too much sleep wasn’t great for the heart, either. The study also found that women who slept more than eight hours a night had an increased risk of atherosclerosis.

Participants with “poor-quality” sleep — frequent awakenings or difficulty getting to sleep — were also 34 percent more likely to have atherosclerosis, compared to those with good-quality sleep.

The study was published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

“This is the first study to show that objectively measured sleep is independently associated with atherosclerosis throughout the body, not just in the heart,” Ordovas said in a journal news release. He also directs nutrition and genomics at the Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, at Tufts University in Boston.

People who had short and poor-quality sleep also tended to consume higher levels of caffeine and alcohol, Ordovas noted.

“Many people think alcohol is a good inducer of sleep, but there’s a rebound effect,” he said. “If you drink alcohol, you may wake up after a short period of sleep and have a hard time getting back to sleep. And if you do get back to sleep, it’s often a poor-quality sleep.”

Two U.S. experts agreed that sleep is a key component of cardiovascular health.

While a direct cause-and-effect relationship between sleep and heart health remains unclear, “targeting one’s sleep habits is finally getting recognized in the medical world as an important factor to improve heart disease,” said Dr. Eugenia Gianos. She directs women’s heart health at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

Gianos reasoned that behaviors in a person’s waking hours may explain the sleep-heart connection. That’s “because patients with good sleep hygiene have the energy to be physically active, make healthy food choices and handle stress better,” she said.

Dr. Thomas Kilkenny directs sleep medicine at Staten Island University Hospital, also in New York City. The new study “opens a door to further investigations to hopefully demonstrate the cause and effect between poor sleep quality and the generation of atherosclerosis disease,” he said.

“In the meantime, physicians should constantly evaluate their patients to identify sleeping disorders and stress to their patients the need to maintain at least six to eight hours of sleep per night,” Kilkenny said.

Source: HealthDay


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