Company Trials Wrapper-less Multipack Pops to Help Reduce Plastic Use

Unilever announces the launch of the first wrapper-less ice-cream multipack for Solero Organic Peach, with 35% less plastic compared to the original Solero Organic pack with individual plastic wrappers.

The new, innovative box has built-in compartments, so the individual ice creams can be inserted, without a plastic wrapper, and the box can be widely recycled in the UK. Made from a specially designed PE (Polyethylene) coated cardboard, the design ensures Solero lovers can enjoy the ice lollies without compromising on the quality of the ice cream.

This trial is the latest innovation in Unilever’s ‘#GetPlasticWise’ initiative which aims to rethink plastic in the UK. The plan sees Unilever working collaboratively with partners to seek out solutions plus support and educate consumers on how they can reduce plastic consumption.

The wrapper-less ice-cream multipack for Solero’s Organic Peach range is being trialled exclusively with Ocado, with a limited number of products, to test the new packaging and gather consumer response.

Noel Clarke, Vice President of Refreshment at Unilever, said: “As we head towards summer, we’ve listened to our customers and are working hard to rethink plastic packaging for our ice cream ranges. We’re delighted to be trialling this wrapper-less Solero multipack with Ocado in the UK. If successful and the feedback from customers is positive, this innovative pack could reduce the amount of plastic we use in the future to package our ice creams.”

Solero is committed to ensure that delivering its ice creams’ real fruit experience does not come at the cost of the earth. This pilot is the first step in the journey of creating a more sustainable packaging. Solero Organic Peach, launched in January 2019, is certified organic, contains 60 kcal per lolly, whilst also being suitable for vegan and vegetarian diets.

Earlier this year Unilever launched its ‘#GetPlasticWise’ campaign, a holistic approach to rethinking plastic. This launch reflects its commitment to ensure that, globally, all of its plastic packaging is fully reusable, recyclable or compostable by 2025, and to using more recycled plastic content in its packaging.

For the UK and Ireland, Unilever wants to significantly accelerate this, as well as making a significant contribution towards the UK Plastics Pact targets.

Helen Bird, Strategic Engagement Manager at WRAP (which manages The UK Plastics Pact), said: “We’re really impressed with the level of innovation and creativity that Unilever, a founding member of The UK Plastics Pact, has shown in developing this new pack. It will be welcomed by shoppers who we know want to be able to recycle the packaging they bring home from supermarkets. We look forward to seeing the results of the trial.”

Source: Unilever

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Strawberry Crush

Ingredients

4 cups strawberries, hulled and cut in half
1 cup ice cubes
1/4 cup whole unblanched almonds
1/4 cup sugar
3 tablespoons milk
2 tablespoons almond-flavored liqueur, such as Amaretto
2 teaspoons slivered unblanched almonds, for garnish

Method

  1. Place strawberries in an airtight container or plastic bag and leave in the freezer for 1-1/2 hours.
  2. Remove strawberries from freezer. Place half of the frozen strawberries in the jar of a blender. Add ice, whole almonds, sugar, milk, and liqueur and as many more strawberries as will fit. Blend until there is enough room to add more strawberries.
  3. Add remaining strawberries and blend until smooth and spoonable. Divide among 4 serving dishes. Garnish with slivered almonds and serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Martha Stewart Living

In Pictures: International Desserts

Cornes de Gazelle, Morocco

Crème Brûlée, France

Egg Tats, Hong Kong

Doughnuts, United States

Eszterhazy Torta, Hungary

Flan, Latin America

Video: What is Ringworm and How Do You Get Rid of It?

Did you know ringworm is not actually a worm?

This video explains what ringworm is, how the culprit feeds on your skin, hair, and nails, and learn how to not be its next meal.

Watch video at You Tube (4:19 minutes) . . . . .

Big Picture Genetic Scoring Approach Reliably Predicts Heart Disease

Specialized risk scores derived from testing that calculates the cumulative effect of an individual’s entire DNA sequence, the genome, may reliably predict heart disease in people who have not yet had a heart attack, according to new research in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine, an American Heart Association journal.

The study is the latest to use polygenic risk scores (PRSs) based on an individual’s entire genome sequence as biomarkers to predict the risk to develop coronary artery disease and heart attack. Several published studies have used PRSs with high accuracy in people of European ancestry. Researchers in this most recent study set out to determine if the results would translate to a different population, in this case French Canadians.

Researchers studied two similar PRSs in 3,639 French Canadian adults with cardiovascular disease and 7,382 adults without heart disease. They found that the PRSs developed and tested in other populations also had the sensitivity and specificity for predicting heart disease in French Canadians.

“PRSs, built using very large data sets of people with and without heart disease, look for genetic changes in the DNA that influence disease risk, whereas individual genes might have only a small effect on disease predisposition,” said Guillaume Lettre, Ph.D., lead author of the study and an associate professor at the Montreal Heart Institute and Université de Montréal in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. “The PRS is like having a snapshot of the whole genetic variation found in one’s DNA and can more powerfully predict one’s disease risk. Using the score, we can better understand whether someone is at higher or lower risk to develop a heart problem.”

Early prediction would benefit prevention, optimal management and treatment strategies for heart disease. Because PRSs are simple and relatively inexpensive, their implementation in the clinical setting holds great promises. For heart disease, early detection could lead to simple yet effective therapeutic interventions such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications.

Results from the study also confirmed original reports showing that the PRSs can identify about 6% to 7% individuals at high risk for cardiac disease. Lettre said this risk was similar to the high heart disease risk among people with familial hypercholesterolemia, a rare but severe disease that predisposes people to very high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL or bad) cholesterol, which puts them at a high risk of heart attack.

“Using the polygenic risk score, even in a normal population, we can find people whose risk is as high as those who have this rare disease,” Lettre said.

PRSs, however, did not perform as well in predicting new events in people who had already had heart attacks, possibly because the participants were older and 76% of those them were on statin treatment which could impact PRS performance.

More research needs to be done before PRSs go mainstream for determining individual heart disease risk, according to Lettre.

The next step is to test the genetic scoring systems long term in large clinical studies to determine if managing and treating people based on their risk scores improves individuals’ heart health. Researchers should also do studies to better understand how to integrate polygenic risk scores with the other known risk factors, such as blood pressure, diabetes and cholesterol levels, but also to extend these studies to non-European ancestry populations, he said.

The American Heart Association named the use of polygenic risk scores as one of the biggest advances in heart disease and stroke research in 2018.

“Eventually, clinicians could use polygenic risk scores along with family history, cholesterol and blood pressure to determine heart disease risk. Used early in a person’s life it might help clinicians more precisely tailor treatment aimed at preventing a heart attack in later years,” said Jennifer Hall, Ph.D., Chief of the American Heart Association’s Institute for Precision Medicine. “This type of research is the basis for the work we are doing within the Institute of Precision Medicine.”

“There is a lot of interest not only in the science arena but also in the general community about using genetics to capture information about disease risk,” Lettre said. “This research is exciting, as genetic testing is becoming more powerful, affordable and it’s easy – often requiring only a swab of one’s saliva.”

Source: American Heart Association


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