New Sweets: Parfait Ice Cream Bars

Japanese-style parfaits you can eat with one hand

The bars are priced from 540 yen to 640 yen in Japan.

Sweet Potato Breakfast Stacks

Ingredients

1 medium sized sweet potato, peeled and cut into 4 rounds (1-inch thick)
2 Tbsp olive oil, divided
salt and pepper to taste
4 large eggs
2 tsp white vinegar
1 garlic clove, minced
1 cup fresh baby spinach
4 slices thick cut bacon, cooked and cut in halves

Method

  1. Add 1 Tbsp oil to a large skillet over medium-low heat. Brown sweet potato slices 3 to 5 minutes per side. Salt and pepper sweet potato. Reduce heat to low, cover with lid and cook until fork tender.
  2. Fill a large saucepan with 2 inches of water, and bring to a boil. Add white vinegar. Reduce heat to a simmer.
  3. Crack eggs into small individual bowls.
  4. Using a large spoon, create a swirl in the saucepan and drop 1 egg at a time in the center of the swirling water.
  5. Poach for 2-3 minutes or until desired doneness is achieved.
  6. Remove poached egg with a slotted spoon and drain over a paper towel. Continue with remaining eggs.
  7. Once sweet potatoes have cooked remove from heat and set aside. Add remaining 1 Tbsp of oil to the warm skillet.
  8. Add garlic and spinach, stirring continuously to not over brown the garlic and wilt the greens. Season with salt and pepper.
  9. Stack sweet potato rounds, topped with spinach, cooked bacon and a poached egg.

Makes 2 to 4 servings.

Source: Manitoba Egg Farmers

In Pictures: Home-cooked Breakfasts

Quitting Alcohol May Improve Mental Well-being, Health-related Quality of Life

Quitting alcohol may improve health-related quality of life for women, especially their mental well-being, according to a study from Hong Kong published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).

“More evidence suggests caution in recommending moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet,” says Dr. Michael Ni, School of Public Health and The State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, University of Hong Kong (HKU).

The study carried out by Dr. Xiaoxin Yao, Dr. Michael Ni, Dr. Herbert Pang and colleagues at HKU included 10 386 people from the FAMILY Cohort in Hong Kong who were nondrinkers or moderate drinkers (14 drinks or less per week for men and 7 drinks or less per week for women) between 2009 and 2013. The researchers compared their findings with data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a representative survey of 31 079 people conducted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism in the United States.

The mean age of participants in the FAMILY Cohort was 49 years and 56% were women. About 64% of men were nondrinkers (abstainers and former drinkers) and almost 88% of women were nondrinkers. Men and women who were lifetime abstainers had the highest level of mental well-being at the start of the study (baseline). For women who were moderate drinkers and quit drinking, quitting was linked to a favourable change in mental well-being in both Chinese and American study populations. These results were apparent after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, smoking status, and other factors.

“Global alcohol consumption is expected to continue to increase unless effective strategies are employed,” says Dr. Ni. “Our findings suggest caution in recommendations that moderate drinking could improve health-related quality of life. Instead, quitting drinking may be associated with a more favourable change in mental well-being, approaching the level of lifetime abstainers.”

Source: Science Daily

Hormone Treatment for Prostate Cancer Linked to Heightened Alzheimer’s Risk

E.J. Mundell wrote . . . . . . . . .

Soon after a man is diagnosed with prostate cancer, drugs that lower levels of testosterone are often offered as treatment, since testosterone fuels the cancer’s growth.

But a major new study suggests that this approach might have an unwanted side effect: Higher odds for Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

“Our results suggest that clinicians need to raise their awareness about potential long-term cognitive effects of hormone therapy and discuss these risks with their patients,” said study author Ravishankar Jayadevappa.

He’s a research associate professor of geriatrics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia.

One expert said it does raise troubling questions.

“Most of us are becoming as afraid of getting Alzheimer’s as we are of getting cancer,” said Dr. Elizabeth Kavaler, a urology specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “When a study pits one debilitating condition against another, it instills fear in patients.”

But the treatment — called androgen-deprivation therapy — remains the “gold standard” for many cases of prostate cancer, according to Kavaler. Therefore, the new data means “tough decision-making” for patients and their physicians, she said.

In the new study, Jayadevappa’s group took a look back at U.S. National Cancer Institute data on over 154,000 prostate cancer patients who were diagnosed between 1996 and 2003. About 62,000 received hormone-depleting therapy within two years of their diagnosis, while about 92,000 did not.

In total, 13% of men who had received the therapy went on to develop Alzheimer’s disease over eight years of follow-up, compared to 9% who hadn’t gotten the treatment, the study found. According to the researchers, the lifetime prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in men generally is about 12%.

When the team looked at diagnoses of all forms of dementia, 22% of those who’d received the therapy received such a diagnosis, compared to 16% of those who hadn’t undergone hormonal therapy.

Jayadevappa’s team noted that earlier, smaller studies have found similar trends.

However, “to our knowledge, this is one of the largest studies to date examining this association, and it followed patients for an average of eight years after their prostate cancer diagnosis,” he said in a university news release.

As the researchers noted, androgen-deprivation therapy is an effective means of slowing the progress of prostate cancers. However, it is now typically only used in cases of advanced disease, or cases where the chances of a tumor recurrence are high.

The approach also has other deleterious side effects, including impaired sexual function, and potential harm to bones and cardiovascular health.

The study also can only point to an association between hormonal treatment and raised odds for dementia, it cannot prove cause and effect. But Jayadevappa’s team noted that they tried to account for other factors, such as age, the presence of other medical conditions and the severity of the prostate cancer.

Dr. Maria Torroella Carney is chief of geriatric and palliative medicine at Northwell Health in New Hyde Park, N.Y. Looking over the findings, she said they warrant further study, but it’s not time for men who’ve gotten hormonal therapy to panic.

Carney stressed that the study couldn’t prove cause and effect, and other factors might account for the higher risk of dementia.

Men receiving hormonal therapy tended to be “older, sicker and had more advanced prostate cancer,” Carney noted, and sicker patients already have higher odds of dementia.

In addition, the study didn’t reveal whether or not men who got the therapy lived longer than those who didn’t. If they did live longer, their odds of dementia would also increase over time, Carney explained.

Study co-author Dr. Thomas Guzzo agreed that no one should make rash decisions on prostate cancer care based on this study alone.

“I think we need to look at these patients on an individual level,” said Guzzo, who is chief of urology at the University of Pennsylvania. “Certainly, there are patients who need hormonal therapy and benefit from it greatly,” he said in a university news release. “There are others where the evidence is less clear, and in these patients, we should consider the risk of hormonal therapy versus the benefit in treating their prostate cancer. This should be a shared decision-making process with the patient.”

The study was published online in JAMA Network Open.

Source: HealthDay


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