Gadget: All-in-one Cooker

CookEasy+

Chris Albrecht wrote . . . . . . . . .

From the big IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin, smart kitchen software company Drop announced the launch of the CookEasy+, a connected all-in-one cooker developed in partnership with Kenwood.

The CookEasy+ is a “multifunctional thermal cooker that allows users to chop, steam, stir, knead, mix, weigh, slow-cook and blend all in one appliance.” Drop’s software platform powers the CookEasy+, relaying step-by-step guided cooking instructions to the device, including temperature, time and speed.

The CookEasy+ also has an integrated scale that Drop says has “single-gram” precision with a max capacity of six kilograms, so you can weigh out the proper amount of ingredients in the device as you are preparing a dish.

CookEasy+ cook programs can be controlled via a tablet running the Drop software. There is also a range of preset programs available on the built-in 4.3-inch color touchscreen.

The CookEasy+ will be available in stores across France starting in September and will cost €999 ( about US$1,100).

Source: The Spoon


Watch video at You Tube (0:53 minutes) . . . . .

Advertisements

Italian Caprese Avocado Toast

Ingredients

1 pint cherry tomatoes (halved)
1/4 cup basil, finely sliced, plus more garnish if desired
4 slices whole-grain or whole wheat bread (toasted)
1 avocado, halved and pitted
1/8 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 cup fat-free, shredded mozzarella
2 tsp balsamic vinegar

Method

  1. Halve each cherry tomato and finely slice the basil leaves.
  2. Toast each piece of bread.
  3. Slice the avocado in half and remove the pit. Use a spoon to remove the avocado’s flesh from the skin and place it into a bowl.
  4. Add the chopped basil and pepper. Mash together with a fork.
  5. Divide avocado mixture between each toast piece, spreading a layer onto each one.
  6. Place each toast onto a plate.
  7. Add tomatoes onto the avocado cut-side-down. There may not be space for all the tomatoes, depending on how large the bread is.
  8. Divide shredded mozzarella between each toast and drizzle with balsamic vinegar.
  9. Garnish with a few basil leaves, if desired, before serving.

Makes 4 servings.

Tip

  • If you prefer a gooey, cheesy toast, place under the broiler for 1 to 2 minutes for the mozzarella to melt.
  • If the avocado is ripe but still a bit firm, peel and add avocado flesh into a blender or food processor to purée with the basil leaves.

Source: American Heart Association

In Pictures: Home-cooked Breakfasts

Gold Nanoparticles Used in Photothermal Therapy Shown to be Safe and Effective Treatment for Prostate Cancer

Biocompatible gold nanoparticles designed to convert near-infrared light to heat have been shown to safely and effectively ablate low- to intermediate-grade tumors within the prostate, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine and published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This treatment could offer patients a targeted therapy option that would preserve critical structures within the prostate, thus avoiding side effects associated with whole-gland treatment such as prostatectomies.

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in the United States¾11 percent of men will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime. Removal or other whole-gland treatment of the prostate carries risks of urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. However, technological advances have provided clinicians with options for focal therapies with fewer complications.

In this study, researchers tested the effectiveness of AuroLase® Therapy, a treatment from medical device company Nanospectra Biosciences that is based on technology invented at Rice University by engineer and chemist Naomi Halas, PhD, and Duke University bioengineer Jennifer West, PhD. The Principal Investigator and lead author, Ardeshir Rastinehad, DO, Associate Professor of Urology, and Radiology, at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, invented the technique used in the clinical trial to target and treat the prostate cancer cells using a custom-built MR US fusion guided platform in collaboration with Philips Healthcare. AuroLase® uses gold-silica nanoshells (GSN), particles Dr. Halas invented that are composed of a silica core and a gold shell with a diameter of 150 nanometers. AuroShells® are designed to absorb energy from near-infrared light and convert it to heat, resulting in selective hyperthermic cell death, without affecting adjacent non-tumorous tissue. The treatment was effectively demonstrated in previous cell studies and animal models. Following treatment, the particles are cleared through the liver, while some remain sequestered in the liver and spleen. There are no known side effects.

Sixteen men aged 58 to 79 with low- to intermediate-grade prostate cancer (Gleason score of 4+3) received GSN infusion. All were diagnosed and treated at The Mount Sinai Hospital using a targeted biopsy technique called magnetic resonance-ultrasound fusion imaging, which uses MRI technology to extract a tissue sample directly from the tumor. Patients underwent GSN infusion and high-precision laser ablation, and received an MRI of the prostate 48-72 hours after the procedure, MRI-targeted fusion biopsies at 3 and 12 months, and a standard biopsy at 12 months. Patients were discharged on the same day as the procedure after several hours of monitoring.

GSN-mediated focal laser ablation was successful in 87.5 percent of lesions treated at one year of follow-up. The goal of researchers was to find an eradication of cancer cells during biopsy.

“Gold-silica nanoshells infusion allows for a focused therapy that treats the cancer, while sparing the rest of the prostate, thus preserving a patient’s quality of life by reducing unwanted side effects, which could include erectile dysfunction and/or the leakage of urine,” said Dr. Rastinehad.

“Mount Sinai’s interventional urology program is research-driven and offers patients minimally invasive treatment therapies that improve quality of life,” said Ash Tewari, MBBS, MCh, Chair of the Department of Urology at the Mount Sinai Health System and the Kyung Hyun Kim, MD Professor of Urology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “Dr. Rastinehad’s gold nanoparticle research shows that patients are not only benefiting from this treatment, but also experiencing minimal side effects.”

Source: Mount Sinai

Greater Left Ventricular Mass Increases Risk of Heart Failure

Elevated left ventricular (LV) mass is a stronger predictor of coronary artery disease-related death and heart failure than coronary artery calcium score, according to a new study in the journal Radiology.

In the study led by Nadine Kawel-Boehm, MD, a senior staff radiologist at Hospital Graubünden in Chur, Switzerland, a team of researchers analyzed data collected in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. MESA is an ongoing, multi-center study of a diverse, population-based sample of 6,814 men and women age 45-84 with no known heart disease.

According to Dr. Kawel-Boehm, there is little research on predicting the long-term risk of cardiovascular events in ethnically diverse patients who have MRI-identified LV hypertrophy.

“Previous studies have used ECG or echocardiography, which have lower sensitivity in the diagnosis of LV hypertrophy, and typically follow patients for only several years,” she said. “The MESA study used MRI, which is the gold standard for quantifying LV mass, and had a long follow-up of 15 years.”

The researchers studied otherwise healthy individuals from the community in the MESA study. The 4,988 MESA participants underwent a baseline cardiac MRI between 2000 and 2002 and participated in follow-up over a 15-year period. MRI showed that 247 participants in the study group had LV hypertrophy.

The mean age of all participants at baseline was 62 years, and 52 percent were women. Thirty-nine percent were white, 13 percent were Asian, 26 percent were African American and 22 percent were Hispanic.

At the 15-year follow-up, the research team found that 290 patients had a significant coronary heart disease (CHD) event, including 207 myocardial infarctions and 95 CHD deaths. Cardiovascular disease-related deaths occurred in 57 patients, and 215 patients had heart failure.

A statistical analysis of the data demonstrated that LV hypertrophy was an independent predictor of significant CHD events, including myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease-related death and heart failure.

According to the analysis, 22 percent of the study participants with LV hypertrophy had a significant CHD event, compared to 6 percent of participants without LV hypertrophy.

Patients with LV hypertrophy had 4.3 times the risk of coronary artery disease-related death compared to participants without LV hypertrophy. Deaths from coronary and non-coronary related cardiovascular causes were more strongly related to LV hypertrophy than to coronary artery calcium scoring done with a CT scan.

“In contrast to the widely used coronary artery calcium by CT, which measures a condition not known to regress under medical therapy, an elevated LV mass is potentially reversible under treatment,” Dr. Kawel-Boehm said.

As a result of the long length of the study follow-up, Dr. Kawel-Boehm said the researchers were able to determine that the risk of cardiovascular events began to increase in participants with LV hypertrophy particularly after five years.

“Our results provide further evidence and motivation for regular follow up and management of individuals with LV hypertrophy,” she said. “A higher LV mass quantified by imaging may matter more in some instances than a high calcium score.”

Source: Radiological Society of North America