Pizza on Top of Pizza – New Pizza Created by Aoki’s Pizza in Japan

Nick Mountain

Nick Mountain is not just a pizza that overlaps. As the name suggests, it is characterized by meat being piled up like a mountain.

On the top are beef steak, hamburger, roast ham, Iberico bacon, sliced ​​bacon, sliced ​​bacon, bacon bits, grand alto bavarian, pepperoni, mini wine, pork sausage, Italian sausage.

And between the crusts, there are black beef ribs, chicken, specially ground meat, spicy meat sauce, taco meat, and raw ham.

The price for a medium size pizza is 2.918 yen and for a large size is 4,624 yen. Both prices included tax.

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Purple Sweet Potatoes and Terriyaki Chicken Wing

Ingredients

8 pieces chicken wings

Marinade

1-1/2 tbsp Japanese teriyaki sauce
1/4 tsp ground black pepper
1 tbspp honey

Purple sweet potato sauce

5 pieces purple sweet potato
3-1/2 tbsp whipping cream
1/2 tsp salt

Method

  1. Rinse thoroughly the chicken wings, drain and dry.
  2. Add marinade to chicken and marinate for 4 hours or overnight in the fridge.
  3. Rinse thoroughly the purple sweet potatoes, steam over water for 25 minutes.
  4. Peel and mash with a spoon. Add the whipping cream, and cook to thicken. Season with the salt.
  5. Shallow-fry the chicken wings in oil until golden and crisp. Serve with purple sweet potato sauce.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Chicken Delicacy

In Pictures: Chicken Wings of American Restaurants

Advanced MRI Brain Scan May Help Predict Stroke-related Dementia

An advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) brain scan analysis in patients with stroke-related, small vessel disease helped predict problems with thinking, memory and even dementia, according to new research published in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

When a stroke or other disease damages tiny blood vessels in the brain, the condition is known as small vessel disease. This condition is the most common cause of thinking problems (planning, organizing information and processing speed) and can even lead to dementia. Although early treatment could help patients at risk, no effective test is available to identify them.

This study evaluated the accuracy of a new MRI analysis technique using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), in predicting thinking problems and dementia related to small vessel disease. A single scan measured the brain in fine detail to reveal damaged areas. By comparing these images to a healthy person’s, researchers were able to classify the brain into areas of healthy versus damaged tissue.

Results showed that participants with the most brain damage were much more likely to develop thinking problems. The analysis also helped predict three-fourths of the dementia cases that occurred during the study.

“We have developed a useful tool for monitoring patients at risk of developing dementia and could target those who need early treatment,” said senior author Rebecca A. Charlton, Ph.D., department of psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London, in the United Kingdom.

The study included 99 patients with small vessel disease caused by ischemic stroke, a type of stroke that blocks the blood vessels deep within the brain. Slightly more than one-third were female, average age 68, and most were Caucasian. All participants were enrolled in the St George’s Cognition and Neuroimaging in Stroke (SCANS) study from 2007 to 2015 in London.

Participants received the MRI scans annually for three years and thinking tests annually for five years. Eighteen participants developed dementia during the study, with an average time to onset of approximately three years and four months.

This advanced MRI analysis offers a highly accurate and sensitive marker of small vessel disease severity in a single measure that can be used to detect who will and will not go on the develop dementia in a five-year period, noted Charlton.

The healthy brain scans used for comparison were from one individual and may not represent the true range of all healthy brains. In addition, the study’s relatively small number of participants all had small vessel disease resulting from one type of stroke, so the results may not apply to people with different forms of the disease.

Source: American Heart Association

Heartburn Drug May Contain Small Amounts of Known Carcinogen, FDA Says

A substance that could cause cancer has been found in some ranitidine heartburn and ulcer medicines, including the brand-name drug Zantac, and the source of this contamination is being investigated, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

While preliminary tests found low levels of the nitrosamine impurity N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) in some ranitidine products, the FDA said this does not mean patients taking the drugs should stop using them now.

NDMA is the same contaminant found in many brands of blood pressure and heart failure medicines during the past year, leading to recalls.

Patients who are taking prescription ranitidine and want to stop using it should discuss alternatives with their health care provider, the FDA advised. Those taking over-the-counter (OTC) ranitidine could switch to other OTC medicines.

Several drugs are approved for the same or similar uses, the FDA noted.

NDMA is an environmental contaminant found in water and foods, including meats, dairy products and vegetables. It is classified as a probable human carcinogen.

“Drug impurities remain a major national concern,” said Dr. David Robbins, associate chief of endoscopy at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. “While Zantac may prove safe in the long run, this latest statement adds confusion and concern, so my interim advice to patients is simple: switch to another drug … and of course, confirm with your doctor the need for an antacid.”

The FDA said it’s evaluating whether the low levels of NDMA in ranitidine pose a risk to patients and that it will post that information when it’s available.

In a statement, pharmaceutical giant Sanofi, which makes Zantac, said that it “takes patient safety seriously, and we are committed to working with the FDA. Zantac OTC (over the counter) has been around for over a decade and meets all the specified safety requirements for use in the OTC market.”

In the meantime, Dr. Janet Woodcock, director of the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said the FDA is working with international regulators and industry partners to find out where the contamination originated.

“The agency is examining levels of NDMA in ranitidine and evaluating any possible risk to patients,” she said in a news release. “The FDA will take appropriate measures based on the results of the ongoing investigation.”

Large amounts of NDMA may pose a risk, but the levels of NDMA in ranitidine found in preliminary tests barely exceed amounts found in common foods, according to the FDA.

Ranitidine decreases the amount of acid created by the stomach. OTC ranitidine is approved to prevent and relieve heartburn, and prescription ranitidine is approved for a number of uses, including treatment and prevention of ulcers of the stomach and intestines, and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

Similar contamination in heart medicines is also under investigation.

“The FDA has been investigating NDMA and other nitrosamine impurities in blood pressure and heart failure medicines called Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARBs) since last year,” Woodcock said. “In the case of ARBs, the FDA has recommended numerous recalls as it discovered unacceptable levels of nitrosamines.”

Source: HealthDay


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