KFC Launched New Chicken & Donut in the U.S. Nationwide

The sandwich, which was called the Kentucky Fried Chicken & Donuts combines two hot, freshly glazed donuts and a piece of juicy fried chicken.

The new sandwich will be available for a limited time period at participating locations.

Baked Stuffed Fish Rolls

Ingredients

500 g fish fillet (Garoupa or Basa)
100 g shrimp (shells removed)
100 g lean pork
1 tbsp diced cooked ham
3 whole water-chestnut
2 egg
tomato slices, shredded lettuce and parsley to garnish

Method

  1. Cut fish fillet lengthwise into thin slices. Mince shrimp and pork separately. Smash and chop water-chestnut and squeeze away a bit of water.
  2. Beat one egg in a bowl, add 1/4 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp chicken broth mix, 1/2 tsp sugar, a dash of ground white pepper, 3 tbsp cornstarch and mix well. Mix in fish slices.
  3. Place shrimp and pork in a bowl. Add 1/4 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp sugar, 1 tsp light soy sauce, 1 tsp sesame oil, a dash of ground white pepper powder, 1 tbsp cornstarch and mix until sticky. Mix in water-chestnut and ham to make the stuffing.
  4. Stretch out each slice of fish, place one portion of stuffing on it and roll into a cylinder. Brush the surface with beaten egg.
  5. Place all fish rolls in a greased baking tray. Bake in a pre-heated 300ºF oven for about 20 minutes until done. Remove fish rolls to the serving plate. Garnish with lettuce, tomato and parsley. Serve with chili sauce or ketchup on the side.

Source: The Master Chef

In Pictures: Chinese Dim Sum of Eight Restaurant in Macau, China

The Michelin 3-stars Restaurant

Study of 418,000 Europeans Finds Different Foods Linked to Different Types of Stroke

Different types of food are linked to risks of different types of stroke, according to the largest study to investigate this, published in the European Heart Journal [1] today.

Until now, most studies have looked at the association between food and total stroke (all types of stroke combined), or focused on ischaemic stroke only. However, the current study of more than 418,000 people in nine European countries investigated ischaemic stroke and haemorrhagic stroke separately.

The study found that while higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, fibre, milk, cheese or yoghurt were each linked to a lower risk of ischaemic stroke, there was no significant association with a lower risk of haemorrhagic stroke. However, greater consumption of eggs was associated with a higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, but not with ischaemic stroke.

Ischaemic stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery supplying blood to the brain or forms somewhere else in the body and travels to the brain where it blocks blood flow. Haemorrhagic stroke occurs when there is bleeding in the brain that damages nearby cells. About 85% of strokes are ischaemic and 15% are haemorrhagic. Stroke is the second leading cause of deaths worldwide.

Dr Tammy Tong, the first author of the paper and a nutritional epidemiologist at the Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford (UK), said: “The most important finding is that higher consumption of both dietary fibre and fruit and vegetables was strongly associated with lower risks of ischaemic stroke, which supports current European guidelines. The general public should be recommended to increase their fibre and fruit and vegetable consumption, if they are not already meeting these guidelines.

“Our study also highlights the importance of examining stroke subtypes separately, as the dietary associations differ for ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke, and is consistent with other evidence, which shows that other risk factors, such as cholesterol levels or obesity, also influence the two stroke subtypes differently.”

The total amount of fibre (including fibre from fruit, vegetables, cereal, legumes, nuts and seeds) that people ate was associated with the greatest potential reduction in the risk of ischaemic stroke. Every 10g more intake of fibre a day was associated with a 23% lower risk, which is equivalent to around two fewer cases per 1000 of the population over ten years.

Fruit and vegetables alone were associated with a 13% lower risk for every 200g eaten a day, which is equivalent to one less case per 1000 of the population over ten years. No foods were linked to a statistically significant higher risk of ischaemic stroke.

Based on UK estimates, two thick slices of wholemeal toast provide 6.6g of fibre, a portion of broccoli (around eight florets) provides about 3g, and a medium raw, unpeeled apple provides about 1.2g of fibre. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe recommend consuming at least 400g of fruit and vegetables a day; the ESC also suggests people should consume 30-45g of fibre a day.

The researchers found that for every extra 20g of eggs consumed a day there was a 25% higher risk of haemorrhagic stroke, equivalent to 0.66 extra cases per 1000 (or around two cases per 3000) of the population over ten years. An average large-sized egg weighs approximately 60g. Egg consumption in the EPIC study was low overall, with an average of less than 20g eaten a day.

The researchers say the associations they found between different foods and ischaemic and haemorrhagic stroke might be explained partly by the effects on blood pressure and cholesterol.

Dr Tong and her colleagues analysed data from 418,329 men and women in nine countries (Denmark, Germany, Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) who were recruited to the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study between 1992 and 2000. The participants completed questionnaires asking about diet, lifestyle, medical history and socio-demographic factors, and were followed up for an average of 12.7 years. During this time, there were 4281 cases of ischaemic stroke and 1430 cases of haemorrhagic stroke.

Food groups studied included meat and meat products (red meat, processed meat and poultry), fish and fish products (white fish and fatty fish), dairy products (including milk, yogurt, cheese), eggs, cereals and cereal products, fruit and vegetables (combined and separately), legumes, nuts and seeds, and dietary fibre (total fibre and cereal, fruit and vegetable fibre).

Major strengths of the study include the large numbers of people studied in several different countries and long follow-up period. Most types of food were included in the study, although information on diet was collected at only one point in time, when the participants joined the study. As the study is observational it cannot show that the foods studied cause an increase or decrease in risk of ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke, only that they are associated with different risks. Information on medication use (including statins) was not available.

Source: European Society of Cardiology

Wearable Brain Stimulation Could Safely Improve Motor Function after Stroke

A non-invasive, wearable, magnetic brain stimulation device could improve motor function in stroke patients, according to preliminary late breaking science presented at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference 2020.

In an initial, randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled clinical trial of 30 chronic ischemic stroke survivors, a new wearable, multifocal, transcranial, rotating, permanent magnet stimulator, or TRPMS, produced significant increases in physiological brain activity in areas near the injured brain, as measured by functional MRI.

“The robustness of the increase in physiological brain activity was surprising. With only 30 subjects, a statistically significant change was seen in brain activity,” said lead study author David Chiu, M.D., director of the Eddy Scurlock Stroke Center at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. “If confirmed in a larger multicenter trial, the results would have enormous implications. This technology would be the first proven treatment for recovery of motor function after chronic ischemic stroke.”

Magnetic stimulation of the brain was previously investigated to promote recovery of motor function after stroke. The stimulation may change neural activity and induce reorganization of circuits in the brain. Researchers introduced a new wearable stimulator.

Stroke survivors who had weakness on one side of their body at least three months post-stroke were enrolled in a preliminary study to evaluate safety and efficacy of the device. Half of the patients were treated with brain stimulation administered in twenty 40-minute sessions over four weeks. The rest had sham, or mock, treatment. Researchers analyzed physiologic brain activity before, immediately after and one month after treatment.

They found that treatment was well tolerated, and there were no device-related complications. Active treatment produced significantly greater increases in brain activity: nearly 9 times higher than the sham treatment.

Although the study could not prove that the transcranial stimulator improved motor function, numerical improvements were demonstrated in five of six clinical scales of motor function, as measured by a functional MRI test. The scales measured gait velocity, grip strength, pinch strength, and other motor functions of the arm. The treatment effects persisted over a three-month follow-up.

The researchers believe the study results are a signal of possible improved clinical motor function after magnetic brain stimulation for patients after stroke, which will need to be confirmed in a larger, multicenter trial.

Source : American Heart Association


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