Horlicks Vegan to Arrive in the UK

Iconic British brand Horlicks announces the launch of Horlicks Vegan for foodservice, a dairy-free Horlicks blend that provides foodservice operators with a vegan ingredient that can be used to create an extensive range of on-trend, dairy-free menu options. The company reports that this marks the first vegan-friendly malted drink brand to enter the European market.

Registered by The Vegan Society, the new recipe has been developed to cater not only to vegans, but also for those who suffer from dairy allergies. Available now for foodservice providers in 6 x 400 g jars, Horlicks Vegan is enriched with 14 key vitamins and minerals.

Michelle Younger, Marketing Manager for Horlicks comments: “Whether a foodservice operator is looking to use this blend to create a delicious dairy-free version of the classic malted beverage that our nation knows and loves, or whether they are looking to create dairy-free shakes, frappes, bakes, cakes and more, our highly versatile Horlicks Vegan will help satisfy soaring demand for new vegan options, as well as meet the trend for malted flavours on menus.”

Source: Vegconomist

Most Women Receive Inappropriate Treatment for Urinary Tract Infections

Nearly half of women with uncomplicated urinary tract infections received the wrong antibiotics and almost three-quarters received prescriptions for longer than necessary, with inappropriately long treatment durations more common in rural areas, according to a study of private insurance claims data published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America.

“Inappropriate antibiotic prescriptions for uncomplicated urinary tract infections are prevalent and come with serious patient- and society-level consequences,” said Anne Mobley Butler, PhD, lead author of the study and assistant professor of medicine and surgery at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. “Our study findings underscore the need for antimicrobial stewardship interventions to improve outpatient antibiotic prescribing, particularly in rural settings.”

Researchers studied insurance claims data for 670,400 women ages 18 to 44 who received an outpatient diagnosis of uncomplicated urinary tract infection between April 2011 and June 2015. They identified filled antibiotic prescriptions, assessed adherence to clinical guidelines, and compared rural and urban antibiotic usage patterns.

Rural patients were more likely to receive a prescription for an inappropriately long duration of therapy than urban patients, according to an analysis of geographic data from the claims database. While use of both inappropriate antibiotic choice and inappropriate duration of prescriptions declined slightly over the study period, inappropriate prescriptions continued to be common with 47% of prescriptions written for antibiotics outside guideline recommendations and 76% for an inappropriate duration, nearly all of which were longer than recommended.

“Accumulating evidence suggests that patients have better outcomes when we change prescribing from broad-acting to narrow-spectrum antibiotics and from longer to shorter durations,” Butler said. “Promoting optimal antimicrobial use benefits the patient and society by preventing avoidable adverse events, microbiome disruption, and antibiotic-resistant infections.”

Clinicians should periodically review clinical practice guidelines, even for common conditions, to determine the ideal antibiotic and treatment duration, Butler said. Auditing outpatient antibiotic prescribing patterns and periodic feedback to healthcare provider helps remind clinicians of the best practices and improves antibiotic prescribing. However, additional research should be performed to understand and ultimately improve rural outpatient antibiotic prescribing practices for urinary tract infections and other common conditions.

Possible explanations for study findings, which are consistent with other research reflecting rural disparities, may be that rural providers may not be as aware of current antibiotic treatment guidelines. In addition, urban providers who treat rural patients may prescribe longer antibiotic durations because of distance-to-care barriers in case symptoms persist. Further research is needed to identify reasons for higher inappropriate prescribing in rural settings.

Source: The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America

What’s for Lunch?

Vegetarian Set-lunch at Vegecafe Lotus in Toyohashi, Japan

The main dish is Quinoa and Tofu Hamburg Steak (gluten free).

Older Women Who Ate More Plant Protein Had Lower Risk of Premature, Dementia-related Death

Postmenopausal women who ate high levels of plant protein had lower risks of premature death, cardiovascular disease and dementia-related death compared with women who ate less plant proteins, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association.

Previous research has shown an association between diets high in red meat and cardiovascular disease risk, yet the data is sparse and inconclusive about specific types of proteins, the study authors say.

In this study, researchers analyzed data from more than 100,000 postmenopausal women (ages 50 to 79) who participated in the national Women’s Health Initiative study between 1993 and 1998; they were followed through February 2017. At the time they enrolled in the study, participants completed questionnaires about their diet detailing how often they ate eggs, dairy, poultry, red meat, fish/shellfish and plant proteins such as tofu, nuts, beans and peas. During the study period, a total of 25,976 deaths occurred (6,993 deaths from cardiovascular disease; 7,516 deaths from cancer; and 2,734 deaths from dementia).

Researchers noted the levels and types of protein women reported consuming, divided them into groups to compare who ate the least and who ate the most of each protein. The median percent intake of total energy from animal protein in this population was 7.5% in the lowest quintile and 16.0% in the highest quintile. The median percent intake of total energy from plant protein in this population was 3.5% in the lowest quintile and 6.8% in the highest quintile.

Among the key findings:

  • Compared to postmenopausal women who had the least amount of plant protein intake, those with the highest amount of plant protein intake had a 9% lower risk of death from all causes, a 12% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and a 21% lower risk of dementia-related death.
  • Higher consumption of processed red meat was associated with a 20% higher risk of dying from dementia.
  • Higher consumption of unprocessed meat, eggs and dairy products was associated with a 12%, 24% and 11% higher risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, respectively.
  • Higher consumption of eggs was associated with a 10% higher risk of death due to cancer.
  • However, higher consumption of eggs was associated with a 14% lower risk of dying from dementia, while higher poultry consumption was associated with a 15% lower risk.

“It is unclear in our study why eggs were associated with a higher risk of cardiovascular and cancer death,” said lead study author Wei Bao, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. “It might be related to the way people cook and eat eggs. Eggs can be boiled, scrambled, poached, baked, basted, fried, shirred, coddled or pickled or in combinations with other foods. In the United States, people usually eat eggs in the form of fried eggs and often with other foods such as bacon. Although we have carefully accounted for many potential confounding factors in the analysis, it is still difficult to completely tease out whether eggs, other foods usually consumed with eggs, or even non-dietary factors related to egg consumption, may lead to the increased risk of cardiovascular and cancer death.”

Researchers noted that substitution of total red meat, eggs or dairy products with nuts was associated with a 12% to 47% lower risk of death from all causes depending on the type of protein replaced with nuts.

“It is important to note that dietary proteins are not consumed in isolation, so the interpretation of these findings could be challenging and should be based on consideration of the overall diet including different cooking methods,” said Yangbo Sun, M.D., Ph.D., co-author of the study, a postdoctoral research scholar at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and currently an assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center.

The analysis also revealed that women who ate the highest amount of animal protein such as meat and dairy were more likely to be white and have a higher education and income, and they were more likely to be past smokers, drink more alcohol and be less physically active. Moreover, these women were more likely to have Type 2 diabetes at the start of the study, a family history of heart attacks and a higher body mass index — all risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

“Our findings support the need to consider dietary protein sources in future dietary guidelines,” said Bao. “Current dietary guidelines mainly focus on the total amount of protein, and our findings show that there may be different health influences associated with different types of protein foods.”

2020-2025 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, jointly published by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Health and Human Services (HHS), recommend eating a variety of protein foods: low-fat meat, low-fat poultry, eggs, seafood, beans, peas, lentils, nuts, seeds and soy products including at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week.

The AHA’s 2020 Dietary Cholesterol and Cardiovascular Risk advisory notes that given the relatively high content of cholesterol in egg yolks, it remains advisable to limit intake. Healthy individuals can include up to one whole egg or the equivalent daily.

The study had several limitations including that it was observational, based on self-reported data at the beginning of the study and lacked data on how the proteins were cooked. In addition, the findings may not apply to younger women or men.

Source: American Heart Association

Tofu and Wild Rice Salad

Ingredients

6 oz basmati rice
2 oz wild rice
9 oz firm tofu, drained and cubed
1 oz preserved lemon, finely chopped
4 oz bunch of fresh parsley, chopped

Dressing

1 garlic clove, crushed
2 tsp clear agave syrup
2 tsp of the preserved lemon juice
1 tbsp cider vinegar
1 tbsp olive oil
1 small fresh red chili, seeded and finely chopped
1 tsp harissa paste (optional)
ground black pepper

Method

  1. Cook the basmati rice and the wild rice in separate pans until tender. The basmati will take about 10-15 minutes to cook, while the wild rice will take 45-50 minutes. (It is possible to buy packets of ready-mixed long grain and wild rice. This takes 25 minutes to cook because the tough outer skin of the wild rice has been broken.)
  2. Whisk together all the dressing ingredients in a small bowl. Add the tofu, stir to coat and leave to marinate for about 20 minutes while the rice cooks.
  3. Drain the two rice, rinse well under cold water and drain again. Place in a large mixing bowl.
  4. Mix the tofu, dressing, lemon and parsley into the rice. Serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Vegan Cooking


Today’s Comic