Chuckles of the Day




Grandma

Grandma offers to take teenage granddaughter to lunch on Saturday. They agree to meet at a restaurant.

When granddaughter shows up she is obviously wearing no underwear.

Grandma says, “Dear, you appear to have forgotten your undergarment!”

Granddaughter says,” No Grandma, it is a fashion statement and I want everyone to see my rosebuds!”

A little while later Grandma excuses herself and goes to powder her nose.

When she returns, Granddaughter exclaims, “Grandma what happened to your underwear?”

Grandma says, “Oh I want to show off my hanging baskets!”.

* * * * * * *

God

A young woman brings her fiance home to meet her parents.

After dinner, her mother tells her father to find out about the young man, so the father invites the fiancee to his study for a drink.

“So what are your plans?” the father asks the young man.

“I am a Torah scholar,” he replies.

“A Torah scholar. Hmmm,” the father says. “Admirable, but what will you do to provide a nice house for my daughter to live in, as she’s accustomed to?”

“I will study,” the young man replies, “and God will provide for us.”

“And how will you buy her a beautiful engagement ring, such as she deserves?” asks the father.

“I will concentrate on my studies,” the young man replies, “God will provide for us.”

“And children?” asks the father. “How will you support children?”

“Don’t worry, sir, God will provide,” replies the fiance.

The conversation proceeds like this, and each time the father questions, the young idealist insists that G-d will provide.

Later, the mother asks, “How did it go, Honey?” and the father answers, “He has no job and no plans, but the good news is he thinks I’m God.”

* * * * * * *

Young Wife

A 60 year old man was having coffee with his 70 year old friend who had just married a 25 year old.

“Your wife must be great in bed”, he said.

“No, not really,” replied the older man.

“Then she must be a great cook and housekeeper.”

“No she’s not much for that, either, said the married man.”

“Then why did you marry her?”

“Because she drives at night.”




Thousands of Men to Trial Prostate Cancer Home Testing Kit

Thousands of men worldwide are to receive a home test kit for prostate cancer – thanks to pioneering research from the University of East Anglia and the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital (NNUH).

The research team are trialling a new home-testing ‘Prostate Screening Box’ to collect men’s urine samples at-home. The urine samples will be used to analyse the health of the prostate in 2,000 men in the UK, Europe and Canada.

This simple urine test is intended to diagnose aggressive prostate cancer and in a pilot study predicted which patients required treatment up to five years earlier than standard clinical methods.

The Prostate Screening Box has been developed in collaboration with REAL Digital International Limited to create a kit that fits through a standard letterbox.

It means that men can provide a urine sample in the comfort of their own home, instead of going into a clinic or having to undergo an uncomfortable rectal examination. The research team hope that it could revolutionise diagnosis of the disease.

Lead researcher Dr Jeremy Clark, from UEA’s Norwich Medical School, said: “Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men in the UK. However it usually develops slowly and the majority of cancers will not require treatment in a man’s lifetime. It is not a simple matter to predict which tumours will become aggressive, making it hard to decide on treatment for many men”.

“The most commonly used tests for prostate cancer include blood tests, a physical examination known as a digital rectal examination (DRE), an MRI scan or a biopsy”.

“We have developed the PUR (Prostate Urine Risk) test, which looks at gene expression in urine samples and provides vital information about whether a cancer is aggressive or ‘low risk’.

“The Prostate Screening Box part sounds like quite a small innovation, but it means that in future the monitoring of cancer in men could be so much less stressful for them and reduce the number of expensive trips to the hospital.

“The prostate lies just below the bladder. It constantly produces secretions which naturally flow into the urethra – the tube through which urine passes from the bladder. The prostatic secretions carry cells and molecules from all over the prostate which are flushed out of the body on urination. We collect these and examine them. It’s a way of sampling the whole prostate in one go.

“As the prostate is constantly secreting, the levels of biomarkers in the urethra will build up with time. Collecting from the first wee of the day means that overnight secretions can be collected which makes the analysis more sensitive.”

The team have previously trialled the kit with a small group of participants, but in the next phase of the research study are rolling it out to thousands.

Men taking part in the trial will receive a home urine-sampling kit and will be asked to provide two urine samples – one to be taken first thing in the morning and the second an hour later. The samples will then be sent back to the lab for analysis.

Dr Clark said: “Feedback from early participants showed that the at-home collection was much preferred over sample collection in a hospital.

“We hope that using our Prostate Screening Box could in future revolutionise how those on ‘active surveillance’ are monitored for disease progression, with men only having to visit the clinic after a positive urine result.

“This is in contrast to the current situation where men are recalled to the clinic every six to 12 months for a range of tests including DRE, PSA tests, painful and expensive biopsies and MRI. We are working to develop the test to help patients in three years’ time.

“A negative test could enable men to only be retested every two to three years, relieving stress to the patient and reducing hospital workload,” he added.

Robert Mills, Consultant Clinical Director in Urology at NNUH, said: “This simple, non-invasive urine test has the potential to significantly change how we diagnose and manage early prostate cancer for the benefit of patients and health care systems. It may enable us to avoid unnecessary diagnosis of low risk disease as well as managing patients more appropriately with surveillance for those with low risk of progression and early curative treatment for those at high risk of progression.”

Paul Villanti, executive director of programs at Movember, said: “The PUR test has great potential to transform the way prostate cancer is managed. Not only can it accurately predict when a man’s disease will become aggressive and require treatment, but it has the added advantage of allowing men to complete it at home.

“We are proud to have supported the development of the PUR test from its early stages as part of our Global Action Plan on Biomarkers, through to this trial involving thousands of men across the world.

“Through our Global Action Plan on active surveillance, we have been able to identify hundreds of men from the UK, Germany, Italy and Canada who are suitable to take part in this trial.

“We hope it will speed up the trial’s progress and get this test included as part of clinical care for men as quickly as possible.”

Source: University of East Anglia

Burger King Italia Launched the Parmigiano Reggiano Burger in Italy

The Parmigiano Reggiano Burger is made with a new gourmet beef patty, Parmigiano Reggiano-flavored mayonnaise, arugula, fried onions and finished with slices of 15-month aged Parmigiano Reggiano cheese between a fresh brioche bun.

Produced strictly in select farms of northern Italy’s Reggio Emilia region, Parmigiano Reggiano is only made with three natural ingredients – milk, salt and rennet; and must be matured between 12-48 months before being sold.

Source: FoodBeast


Recipe of Hamburger with grilled Parmigiano Reggiano and raw vegetables provided by the Parmigiano Reggiano Consortium . . . . .

New Drug May Be Better Psoriasis Treatment

Dennis Thompson wrote . . . . . . . . .

A breakthrough psoriasis drug is better at treating the itchy and painful skin disease than medicines already on the market, according to results from two clinical trials.

There was a “night and day difference” in the results from bimekizumab compared against two established psoriasis drugs, secukinumab (Cosentyx) and adalimumab (Humira), said Dr. Mark Lebwohl, a co-researcher in one of the clinical trials.

“We’ve never had a drug which in its phase 3 trials had more than 50% of patients achieve” a 100% reduction in their psoriasis symptoms, said Lebwohl, dean for clinical therapeutics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York City.

“We’re now at a point where we can clear the vast majority of psoriasis patients with medications that are very effective and very safe,” he added.

Based on these results, Lebwohl expects the Belgian pharmaceutical company UCB Pharma to pursue quick approval of bimekizumab with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

“I would hope it would be on the market this summer,” he said.

Psoriasis affects more than 8 million people in the United States, according to the National Psoriasis Foundation.

It’s an autoimmune disease that speeds up skin cell growth, causing cells to pile up on the surface of the skin and form plaques that itch, burn and sting. These plaques can appear on any part of the body, but are most often found on the elbows, knees and scalp.

A pro-inflammatory biochemical called interleukin-17 (IL-17) has been implicated in the development of psoriasis, Lebwohl said. Secukinumab and adalimumab work by blocking the chemical’s most potent form, called IL-17A.

Bimekizumab blocks both IL-17A and another form of the chemical called IL-17F, Lebwohl said. The injectable drug is administered once a month.

“The biology [of the two forms of IL-17] is overlapping — 17A is more potent but 17F is more abundant,” Lebwohl said. “Even though 17A is stronger at causing psoriasis, there is more of 17F. By blocking both, you get the full effect.”

After 48 weeks of treatment, about 67% of bimekizumab patients had complete clearing of their psoriasis plaques, compared with 46% of patients receiving secukinumab, according to results of the trial that Lebwohl co-authored. A total 743 patients participated.

The other clinical trial, involving 478 patients, offered similar results. After 16 weeks, 86% of patients on bimekizumab had experienced a 90% reduction in their psoriasis plaques, nearly double the 47% who achieved the same response with adalimumab.

“They block IL-17A, while this blocks both IL-17A and IL-17F,” Lebwohl said. “That’s probably why it’s so effective. Blocking that extra little bit of IL-17 actually gets you the added effectiveness.”

Bimekizumab also has been shown to effectively treat psoriatic arthritis, a condition that affects 1 in 3 people with psoriasis, Lebwohl said.

People taking bimekizumab were four to 10 times more likely to have a reduction in their arthritis symptoms than a placebo group, with the response growing with the size of the dose, according to results published in The Lancet.

Blocking IL-17 does cause a greater risk of yeast infections, and the risk is stronger with bimekizumab than the other two drugs, results showed.

“Nature has done an experiment for us by giving us people who are deficient in IL-17, and they get awful yeast infections,” Lebwohl said. “We anticipated before the study is that the only side effect we’d see was yeast infections, and that’s what happened.”

The mild to moderate cases of yeast infection that occurred in the clinical trials were “easily treated with fluconazole,” an oral anti-fungal drug, Lebwohl said.

Dr. Michele Green, a dermatologist with Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, reviewed the findings.

“This is an impressive study showing significant results using an interleukin-17 inhibitor to treat plaque psoriasis,” she said.

However, Green sounded a note of caution, urging further study of the drug.

“A larger sample size needs to be used since in addition to candidiasis, interleukin inhibitors have been associated with higher rates of other opportunistic infections, severe infections and cancer,” Green said.

The clinical trial results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, and also were presented at an online meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Source: HealthDay

Grilled Chicken with Citrus Salsa

Ingredients

1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon olive oil
2 jalapeno peppers, 1 thinly sliced, 1 diced
4 boneless chicken breasts, trimmed of fat and skin
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 dashes tequila (optional)
1 navel orange, peeled, sectioned, and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
1 small pink grapefruit, peeled, sectioned, and cut into 1/4-inch pieces
4 scallions, thinly sliced
10 yellow and/or red cherry tomatoes, seeded and diced
grated zests of 1/2 orange and 1/2 lime
1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro
4 tomatillos, diced (optional)
4 handfuls of mesclun or other mixed greens

Method

  1. In a shallow bowl, combine 1/4 cup each of the lime juice and oil and the jalapeno slices.
  2. Rub chicken with salt and pepper and add to marinade. Add a dash of tequila. Marinate for at least half an hour.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine citrus fruit, scallions, tomatoes, remaining lime juice and olive oil, zests, salt and pepper, diced jalapeno, cilantro, tomatillos, and remaining tequila. Set aside.
  4. Remove chicken from marinade. Cook on a hot grill for about 5 minutes on each side, or until cooked through.
  5. Remove from grill and let stand 5 minutes.
  6. Divide the greens among four plates.
  7. Slice the chicken and arrange on top of greens.
  8. Spoon salsa over each salad and serve immediately.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: What to Have for Dinner


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