Just Egg Launched Vegan Jianbing (煎餅) in Shanghai, China

Nicole Axworthy wrote . . . . . . . . .

In honor of World Jianbing Day, California-based food technology company Eat Just is launching a JUST Egg Jianbing Guide that highlights the top street vendors in Shanghai offering a vegan jianbing—a traditional Chinese breakfast street food similar to crepes—made with the company’s mung bean-based JUST Egg.

Alongside the launch, the brand and its Future Food Studio is launching a JUST Egg jianbing pop-up featuring creative flavors at all-day breakfast cafe Egg every day for one month.

Last October, Eat Just opened the Future Food Studio in Shanghai—the first all plant-based culinary studio in China. The studio offers cooking classes using JUST Egg taught by chef collaborators. In addition, Eat Just designed a WeChat mini program through which students could sign up for classes. The JUST Egg Jianbing Guide can be accessed through the Future Food Studio mini program where they will also have access to recipes, discounts, and updates from Eat Just.

Vegan eggs in China

Eat Just created the jianbing guide and street vendor offerings as part of an ongoing effort to introduce its plant-based egg products to Chinese consumers. Earlier this year, one of China’s top fast-food chains, Dicos, added several menu items made with vegan JUST Egg to its menu at 500 locations—marking the first time a major fast-food restaurant has swapped an animal-based product with a plant-based one across multiple regular menu offerings. JUST Egg is now featured as part of three breakfast burgers, three bagel sandwiches, and a “Western” breakfast plate.

Source: Veg News

‘Disrupted’ Sleep Could Be Seriously Affecting Your Health

Denise Mann wrote . . . . . . . . .

Waking up briefly throughout the night may do more than leave you feeling grumpy and tired in the morning.

Disrupted sleep may actually increase your odds of dying early from heart disease or any other cause, and women seem to be harder hit by these effects than men.

“The data underscores all the more reasons why we need to be screening people about whether or not they feel refreshed and how much sleep they’re getting each night,” said Dr. Andrea Matsumura, a spokeswoman for the American Academy of Sleep Medicine, who reviewed the findings.

Nighttime arousals are caused by noise, temperature, pain or pauses in breathing as a result of sleep apnea. They are brief, and you’re often unaware they are happening unless they’re strong enough to wake you or your bed partner notices. When these arousals become frequent, however, they may take a toll on your health.

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from sleep monitors worn by participants in three studies. In all, 8,000 men and women were followed for an average of six to 11 years.

Women who experienced more nightly sleep disruptions over longer time periods had nearly double the risk of dying from heart disease and were also more likely to die early from all other causes, compared to women who slept more soundly, the study showed.

Men with more frequent nighttime sleep disruptions were about 25% more likely to die early from heart disease compared to men who got sounder sleep, the investigators found.

The triggers for sleep arousal or the body’s response to it may be different in women than in men, said study author Dominik Linz, an associate professor of cardiology at Maastricht University Medical Center in the Netherlands.

“Women and men may have different compensatory mechanisms for coping with the detrimental effects of arousal,” Linz said.

Exactly how — or even if — disrupted sleep leads to increased risk of early death is not fully understood, and the new study wasn’t designed to show cause and effect.

But the authors of an editorial that accompanied the findings have a few theories.

“Many people with frequent arousals and poor sleep have other risks for heart disease, including obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes and lung disease,” said editorial writer Dr. Valentin Fuster, director of Mount Sinai Heart in New York City.

Anxiety and stress can also rob you of sleep and are known to have harmful health effects.

“During short or interrupted sleep, activation of the sympathetic nervous system and inflammation may play a more direct role,” Fuster said.

When activated, the sympathetic nervous system triggers release of stress hormones that can increase heart rate and blood pressure, which can raise your risk for heart disease over time.

Linz said the best way to improve sleep and reduce nighttime disruptions is to eliminate any arousal triggers.

Consider sound machines to filter out noise, and make sure the temperature in your bedroom is comfortable. If you are overweight or may have sleep apnea, treating these can help head off episodes of “unconscious wakefulness,” Linz said.

Fuster offered some other strategies that can add years to your life: Reducing stress with relaxation techniques, such as yoga, and making sure any heart disease risks are under control.

The new study did have some limitations. It didn’t take into account medication use that can affect sleep. Monitoring took place on just one night, while readings from sleep monitoring tend to fluctuate from night to night. In addition, most participants were white people and older, so the findings may not hold in different populations.

The study and the editorial were published in the European Heart Journal.

The new findings should serve as a wakeup call, said Matsumura, who is also a sleep medicine physician at the Oregon Clinic in Portland.

“When people don’t feel good and wake up feeling unrefreshed, many don’t realize they need to be evaluated by a sleep specialist,” she said.

Taking steps to improve sleep quality is also important, Matsumura added.

“Consider developing a nightly routine that evokes calm and relaxation, which may include reading, journaling or meditating,” she suggested. “Limit noise and distractions by making your bedroom quiet, dark and a little bit cool – and only use the bed for sleeping, not watching TV or reading.”

Limiting alcohol, caffeine and large meals before bedtime will also help you get a better night’s sleep, Matsumura said.

Source: HealthDay

Heinz to Launch 100% Natural Plant-Based Baby Food Range in the U.K.

Food processing company Heinz has been producing baby food for decades. Now, it’s set to launch a plant-based range after market research showed parents weren’t satisfied with the options available.

The range, called Heinz for Baby Pulses, consists of three options — Saucy Pasta Stars with Beans & Carrot, Potato Bake with Green Beans & Sweet Garden Peas, and Risotto with Chickpeas & Pumpkin. All three options are free of added sugar and salt. They also count towards the recommended five daily servings of fruit and vegetables.

The products will launch in June, with a RRP of £0.90.

Rising demand for plant-based baby food

Heinz has increased its plant-based range in recent months, launching vegan salad cream and three varieties of vegan mayo at the start of the year. It also introduced two flavours of bean burgers.

The plant-based baby food launch is a logical next step. British vegan baby food startup Mamamade recorded a 300% increase in sales in just a few months last year, showing that there is huge demand, and plant-based infant formula brand Else Nutrition is also experiencing increasing success.

“We are so excited to be launching this new range for little ones, made with their budding taste buds and parents’ needs in mind,” Heinz for Baby Senior Brand Manager Georgina Fotopoulou told Vegan Food & Living. “At Heinz for Baby we have 90 years of experience when it comes to making baby food, and we know how important it is for parents to make sure their little ones get just the right balance of tasty and unique texture and flavour food. So we can’t wait to see what babies, toddlers and their parents think!”

Source: Vegconomist

Study: People with a High Omega-3 Index Less Likely to Die Prematurely

A new research paper examining the relationship between the Omega-3 Index and risk for death from any and all causes has been published in Nature Communications. It showed that those people with higher omega-3 EPA and DHA blood levels (i.e., Omega-3 Index) lived longer than those with lower levels. In other words, those people who died with relatively low omega-3 levels died prematurely, i.e., all else being equal, they might have lived longer had their levels been higher.

Numerous studies have investigated the link between omega-3s and diseases affecting the heart, brain, eyes and joints, but few studies have examined their possible effects on lifespan.

In Japan, omega-3 intakes and blood levels are higher than most other countries in the world AND they happen to live longer than most. Coincidence? Possibly, or maybe a high Omega-3 Index is part of the explanation.

Studies reporting estimated dietary fish or omega-3 intake have reported benefits on risk for death from all causes, but “diet record” studies carry little weight because of the imprecision in getting at true EPA and DHA intakes. Studies using biomarkers – i.e., blood levels – of omega-3 are much more believable because the “exposure” variable is objective.

This new paper is from the FORCE – Fatty Acids & Outcomes Research – Consortium. FORCE is comprised of researchers around the world that have gathered data on blood fatty acid levels in large groups of study subjects (or cohorts) and have followed those individuals over many years to determine what diseases they develop. These data are then pooled to get a clearer picture of these relationships than a single cohort can provide. The current study focused on omega-3 levels and the risk for death during the follow-up period, and it is the largest study yet to do so.

Specifically, this report is a prospective analysis of pooled data from 17 separate cohorts from around the world, including 42,466 people followed for 16 years on average during which time 15,720 people died. When FORCE researchers examined the risk for death from any cause, the people who had the highest EPA+DHA levels (i.e., at the 90th percentile) had a statistically significant, 13% lower risk for death than people with EPA+DHA levels in the 10th percentile. When they looked at three major causes of death – cardiovascular disease, cancer and all other causes combined – they found statistically significant risk reductions (again comparing the 90th vs 10th percentile) of 15%, 11%, and 13%, respectively.

The range between the 10th and 90th percentile for EPA+DHA was (in terms of red blood cell membrane omega-3 levels, i.e., the Omega-3 Index) about 3.5% to 7.6%. From other research, an optimal Omega-3 Index is 8% or higher.

In the new paper, the authors noted that these findings suggest that omega-3 fatty acids may beneficially affect overall health and thus slow the aging process, and that they are not just good for heart disease.

“Since all of these analyses were statistically adjusted for multiple personal and medical factors (i.e., age, sex, weight, smoking, diabetes, blood pressure, etc., plus blood omega-6 fatty acid levels), we believe that these are the strongest data published to date supporting the view that over the long-term, having higher blood omega-3 levels can help maintain better overall health,” said Dr. Bill Harris, Founder of the Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI), and lead author on this paper.

Dr. Harris co-developed the Omega-3 Index 17 years ago as an objective measure of the body’s omega-3 status. Measuring omega-3s in red blood cell membranes offers an accurate picture of one’s overall omega-3 intake during the last four to six months. To date, the Omega-3 Index has been featured in more than 200 research studies.

“This comprehensive look at observational studies of circulating omega-3 fatty acids indicates that the long chain omega-3s EPA, DPA, and DHA, usually obtained from seafood, are strongly associated with all-cause mortality, while levels of the plant omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are less so,” said Tom Brenna, PhD, Professor of Pediatrics, Human Nutrition, and Chemistry, Dell Medical School of the University of Texas at Austin.

Source: EurekAlert!

Potato-topped Vegetable Pie

Ingredients

1/2 cup green lentils, washed and drained
3 cups barley, washed and drained
1 medium onion, chopped
14-oz can chopped tomatoes
2 cups cauliflower florets
2 celery stalks, sliced
1 leek, thickly sliced
1 turnip, thinly sliced
2 carrots, diced
2 tsp mixed dry herbs
1-1/2 lb potatoes, scrubbed
3 tbsp low-fat milk
salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup low-fat medium-hard cheese, grated

Method

  1. Set the oven to 400°F. Place the lentils, barley, onion, tomatoes (with juice), cauliflower, celery, leek, turnip, carrots, and herbs in a large saucepan and add 1-1/4 cups water. Bring to a boil, cover and simmer for 40-45 minutes or until the lentils, barley, and vegetables are just tender.
  2. Cook the potatoes in boiling, salted water for about 20 minutes, or until they are soft. Drain, peel, and mash them with the milk, and season to taste.
  3. Place the lentil mixture in a baking dish and pipe or fork the mashed potato on top to cover. Sprinkle the cheese on top, and bake the pie in the oven for 30-35 minutes, until it is evenly light brown.
  4. Serve hot. A tomato and herb salad makes a good accompaniment.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Healthy Vegetarian Cooking


Today’s Comic