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Home-cooked Chinese Dinner with 1 Soup and 3 Dishes

Being a ‘Night Owl’ Raises Odds for Diabetes If You’re Obese

Alan Mozes wrote . . . . . . . . .

Though obesity by itself can drive up heart disease risk, new research suggests diabetes and heart disease risk is especially high when combined with a tendency to stay up late at night.

The finding stems from a comparison of sleep patterns and disease in 172 middle-aged people as part of an ongoing obesity prevention study in Italy.

“The sleep-wake cycle is one of the most important behavioral rhythms in humans,” said lead researcher Dr. Giovanna Muscogiuri. She is an assistant professor in the endocrinology unit of the University of Naples Federico II, in Italy.

For the study, her team grouped participants according to their sleep patterns.

Nearly six in 10 were early risers — the so-called “morning larks.” These folks tend to wake up and be most active early in the day.

About 13% were “night owls.” They tended to wake up late and be most active during late afternoon or evening.

The rest — about three in 10 — fell somewhere in between (the “intermediate-type”).

Though study participants in all three groups had similar BMIs, night owls were more likely to eat big dinners and have other unhealthy habits, such as tobacco use and lack of exercise. (BMI, or body mass index, is an estimate of body fat based on height and weight.)

And all that put them at higher risk for health problems.

While 30% of morning larks had heart disease, that figure hit nearly 55% among night owls, the study found.

The risk of type 2 diabetes, meanwhile, was about 9% among morning people, and almost 37% among night owls. There was no difference between morning people and participants who were in the intermediate-type category.

Muscogiuri noted that prior studies have estimated that late risers have 1.3 times the risk of high blood pressure and high cholesterol, compared with early risers. They are also less likely to follow a heart-healthy Mediterranean diet, which is heavy on fruits, vegetables and fish.

Taken together, she said, all these features leave night owls at higher risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

As to the best way to combat it, Muscogiuri suggested that efforts to get obesity under control might be more successful if sleep patterns were taken into account.

So the idea, she explained, would be to help obese patients develop better sleep-wake habits based on earlier rising, because earlier rising patterns might help such patients develop better dietary and activity habits, and thereby “increase their chance of success for weight loss.”

Unfortunately, getting people to change their sleep, eating and activity routines won’t be easy, warned cardiologist Dr. Kenneth Ellenbogen, of the Medical College of Virginia, in Richmond.

“We know how hard it can be to reset an individual’s biological clock or activity habits,” he said. “And while this is certainly fascinating work, it’s really hard to know what’s really going on from one observational study involving a relatively small number of patients.”

Ellenbogen noted, for example, that it’s unclear whether “sleeping in” is a direct cause of the increased risk for type 2 diabetes or heart disease, or whether it’s the lifestyle associated with sleeping in that indirectly raises risk.

“It’s not at all obvious to me what the answer is,” he said after reviewing the findings. “And I certainly wouldn’t say this study proves anything like cause and effect.”

Ellenbogen suggested that the research should be regarded as the start of an ongoing effort to explore links between sleep patterns and heart function.

Muscogiuri’s team presented the findings at a virtual meeting of the European Congress on Obesity. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Source: HealthDay

In Pictures: Xin Rong Ji Restaurant (新榮記) in Wan Chai, Hong Kong

Fine Dining Traditional Taizhou Cuisine

The Michelin 1-star Restaurant

Study: Women with Osteoporosis and Low Bone Density Are at Increased Risk of Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is the third most common chronic health condition in the United States. Previous studies of people with hearing loss have uncovered higher prevalence of osteoporosis — a disease in which the bones become weak and brittle — and low bone density (LBD). But research on whether these conditions may influence risk of hearing loss over time is scarce. It is also unknown whether hearing loss can be avoided by taking bisphosphonates, the primary medication used to prevent fractures in people with reduced bone density. As part of the Conservation of Hearing Study (CHEARS), researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital analyzed data from nearly 144,000 women who were followed for up to 34 years. They found that risk of subsequent moderate or worse hearing loss was up to 40 percent higher in study participants with osteoporosis or LBD. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, also found that bisphosphonates did not alter risk of hearing loss.

“Adult onset hearing loss is typically irreversible; therefore, CHEARS focuses on identifying potentially modifiable risk factors that may contribute to hearing loss,” said study leader Sharon Curhan, MD, ScM, of the Channing Division of Network Medicine at the Brigham. “We were inspired by a recent study that found that bisphosphonates may help prevent noise-induced hearing damage in mice. We wanted to investigate whether bisphosphonates alter risk of hearing loss in adults, in addition to whether there is a longitudinal association between osteoporosis or LBD and risk of subsequent hearing loss.”

For their analysis, the researchers used data from the decades-long Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and NHS II, two large ongoing prospective cohorts of female registered nurses, established in 1976 and 1989, respectively. The researchers examined hearing loss that was moderate or worse in severity, as self-reported by participants on questionnaires completed every two years. Additionally, they used the CHEARS Audiometry Assessment Arm to incorporate data on participants’ audiometric thresholds (a measure of hearing sensitivity based on the loudness of sound).

In both the NHS and NHS II cohorts, the researchers found that the risk of hearing loss was higher in women with osteoporosis or LBD, and that taking bisphosphonates did not moderate the elevated risk. More research is required to understand whether the type, dose or timing of bisphosphonate use might influence its impact.

The researchers found that a history of vertebral fracture was associated with up to a 40 percent higher risk of hearing loss, but the same did not hold true for hip fractures, the two most common osteoporosis-related fractures. “The differing findings between these skeletal sites may reflect differences in the composition and metabolism of the bones in the spine and in the hip,” Curhan said. “These findings could provide new insight into the changes in the bone that surrounds the middle and inner ear that may contribute to hearing loss.”

While the underlying mechanisms by which osteoporosis and LBD may contribute to aging-related hearing loss remain unclear, the researchers suggest that abnormal bone remodeling and changes in the pathways involved in maintaining bone homeostasis may influence the integrity of the bone that protects the nerves and structures involved in hearing or alter ion and fluid metabolism in the cochlea, the main structure involved in hearing.

Advantages of using data from these well-characterized cohorts include the large study population, extensive array of detailed information, impressive follow-up rates and reliable information on health-related outcomes, as the participants are trained health care providers. However, the researchers note that their study is limited in its generalizability, as participants are predominantly white, with similar educational achievements and socio-economic statuses. Curhan points out that additional studies that examine these associations in men and non-white women would be informative.

Additionally, the investigators plan to examine in the future whether calcium and vitamin D intake are associated with hearing loss, as they have been shown to help prevent osteoporosis. Previously, the researchers found that eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, not smoking, and maintaining a healthy weight all help reduce the risk of hearing loss.

“Osteoporosis and low bone density may be important contributors to aging-related hearing loss,” Curhan said. “Building lifelong healthy diet and lifestyle habits could provide important benefits for protecting bone and hearing health in the future.”

Source: Brigham and Women’s Hospital


Read also:

Osteoporosis and Low Bone Mass – What Is the Difference and What Can I Do? . . . . .

Stuffed Crab

Ingredients

1 large crab, about 14 oz
2 oz crab meat
1/2 oz crab roe
1/2 cup milk
1/2 cup egg white
1 egg yolk
1 tbsp cornstarch
dash of salt, pepper
6 broccoli florets

Method

  1. Clean crab and cut into 6 pieces. Steam for about 15 minutes until cooked. Arrange the crab, legs and claws on the serving platter. Place cooked broccoli pieces around the claws.
  2. Mix crab meat, milk, egg white, cornstarch, salt and pepper. Stir-fry in oil until cooked. Place mixture on top of steamed crab.
  3. Place egg yolk in the middle and sprinkle on crab roe before serving.

Source: Recipes of Great Chefs in Hong Kong


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