Chuckles of the Day




Two guys were discussing their aging wives. One was quite sure his wife was going deaf. The other guy gave him a suggestion to test her hearing. “Here’s what you do.

Start about 40 feet away from her, and speak in a normal conversational tone and see if she hears you. If not, go to 30 feet, then 20 feet, and so on until you get a response”.

So, that evening, she’s in the kitchen cooking dinner, and he’s in the living room, and he says to himself, “I’m about 40 feet away, let’s see what happens”.

“Honey, what’s for supper?” No response. So, he moves to the other end of the room, about 30 feet away. “Honey, what’s for supper?” No response.

So, he moves into the dining room, about 20 feet away. “Honey, what’s for supper?” No response.

On to the kitchen door, only 10 feet away. “Honey, what’s for supper? “No response. So, he walks right up behind her.

“Honey, what’s for supper?”

“FOR THE FIFTH TIME, CHICKEN!!”

* * * * * * *

After examining his seventy-five year old patient, the doctor said, “You’re in remarkable shape for a man your age.”

“Yes, I know,” said the old gentleman. “I have only one complaint. My sex drive is too high. Is there anything you can do for that, Doc?”

“Your what?!” gasped the doctor.

“My sex drive,” said the old man. “It’s too high, and I’d like to have you lower it if you can.”

“Lower it?!” the doctor exclaimed, still unable to believe what the seventy- five year old gentleman was saying. “Just what do you consider ‘high’?”

“These days it seems like it’s all in my head, Doc,” said the old man, “and I’d like to have you lower it a couple of feet if you can.”





Study: Avocados Change Belly Fat Distribution in Women

Liz Ahlberg Touchstone wrote . . . . . . . . .

An avocado a day could help redistribute belly fat in women toward a healthier profile, according to a new study from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign and collaborators.

One hundred and five adults with overweight and obesity participated in a randomized controlled trial that provided one meal a day for 12 weeks. Women who consumed avocado as part of their daily meal had a reduction in deeper visceral abdominal fat.

Led by Naiman Khan, an Illinois professor of kinesiology and community health, the researchers published their study, funded by the Hass Avocado Board, in the Journal of Nutrition.

“The goal wasn’t weight loss; we were interested in understanding what eating an avocado does to the way individuals store their body fat. The location of fat in the body plays an important role in health,” Khan said.

“In the abdomen, there are two kinds of fat: fat that accumulates right underneath the skin, called subcutaneous fat, and fat that accumulates deeper in the abdomen, known as visceral fat, that surrounds the internal organs. Individuals with a higher proportion of that deeper visceral fat tend to be at a higher risk of developing diabetes. So we were interested in determining whether the ratio of subcutaneous to visceral fat changed with avocado consumption,” he said.

The participants were divided into two groups. One group received meals that incorporated a fresh avocado, while the other group received a meal that had nearly identical ingredients and similar calories but did not contain avocado.

At the beginning and end of the 12 weeks, the researchers measured participants’ abdominal fat and their glucose tolerance, a measure of metabolism and a marker of diabetes.

Female participants who consumed an avocado a day as part of their meal had a reduction in visceral abdominal fat – the hard-to-target fat associated with higher risk – and experienced a reduction in the ratio of visceral fat to subcutaneous fat, indicating a redistribution of fat away from the organs. However, fat distribution in males did not change, and neither males nor females had improvements in glucose tolerance.

“While daily consumption of avocados did not change glucose tolerance, what we learned is that a dietary pattern that includes an avocado every day impacted the way individuals store body fat in a beneficial manner for their health, but the benefits were primarily in females,” Khan said. “It’s important to demonstrate that dietary interventions can modulate fat distribution. Learning that the benefits were only evident in females tells us a little bit about the potential for sex playing a role in dietary intervention responses.”

The researchers said they hope to conduct a follow-up study that would provide participants with all their daily meals and look at additional markers of gut health and physical health to get a more complete picture of the metabolic effects of avocado consumption and determine whether the difference remains between the two sexes.

“Our research not only sheds a valuable light on benefits of daily avocado consumption on the different types of fat distribution across genders, it provides us with a foundation to conduct further work to understand the full impact avocados have on body fat and health,” said study coauthor Richard Mackenzie, a professor of human metabolism at the University of Roehampton in London.

“By taking our research further, we will be able to gain a clearer picture into which types of people would benefit most from incorporating avocados into their diets and deliver valuable data for health care advisers to provide patients with guidance on how to reduce fat storage and the potential dangers of diabetes,” Mackenzie said.

Source: University of Illinois at Urbans-Champaign

New Spread: Maine Lobster Butter

The spread combined the sweet succulent flavor of wild caught Maine lobster and premium butter complemented by hints of lemon, garlic and sherry to create silky smooth deliciousness.

Eating Peanuts May Lower Risk of Ischemic Stroke, Cardiovascular Disease Among Asians

Asian men and women living in Japan who ate peanuts (on average 4-5 peanuts/day) had a lower risk of having an ischemic stroke or a cardiovascular disease event compared to those who did not eat peanuts, according to new research published today in Stroke, a journal of the American Stroke Association, a division of the American Heart Association.

While previous studies have linked peanut consumption with improved cardiovascular health among Americans, researchers in this study specifically examined the link between peanut consumption and the incidence of different types of stroke (ischemic and hemorrhagic) and cardiovascular disease events (such as stroke and ischemic heart disease) among Japanese men and women.

“We showed for the first time a reduced risk for ischemic stroke incidence associated with higher peanut consumption in an Asian population,” said lead study author Satoyo Ikehara, Ph.D., specially appointed associate professor of public health in the department of social medicine at the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine in Suita, Japan. “Our results suggest that adding peanuts to your diet has a beneficial effect on the prevention of ischemic stroke.”

Peanuts are rich in heart-healthy nutrients, such as “monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, minerals, vitamins and dietary fiber that help lower risk of cardiovascular disease by reducing risk factors, including high blood pressure, high blood levels of ’bad’ cholesterol and chronic inflammation,” Ikehara said.

Researchers examined the frequency of how often people reported eating peanuts in relation to stroke occurrence and cardiovascular disease. The analysis includes people who were recruited in two phases, in 1995 and 1998-1999, for a total of more than 74,000 Asian men and women, ages 45 to 74, from the Japan Public Health Center-based Prospective Study. Participants completed a comprehensive lifestyle survey, which included a questionnaire about the frequency of peanut consumption. They were followed for approximately 15 years – through 2009 or 2012, depending on when they were originally enrolled.

The incidence of stroke and ischemic heart disease were determined by linking with 78 participating hospitals in the areas included in the study.

Researchers adjusted for other health conditions, smoking, diet, alcohol consumption and physical activity, as detailed by participants in the questionnaires. According to medical records, researchers noted 3,599 strokes (2,223 ischemic and 1,376 hemorrhagic) and 849 cases of ischemic heart disease developed during the follow-up period.

The levels of peanut consumption were ranked in four quartiles, with 0 peanuts a day as the least intake compared to 4.3 unshelled peanuts a day (median) as the highest. Compared to a peanut-free diet, researchers found eating about 4-5 unshelled peanuts per day was associated with:

  • 20% lower risk of ischemic stroke;
  • 16% lower risk of total stroke; and
  • 13% lower risk of having cardiovascular disease (this included both stroke and ischemic heart disease).
  • A significant association was not found between peanut consumption and a lower risk of hemorrhagic stroke or ischemic heart disease.

The link between peanut consumption and lowered risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease was consistent in both men and women.

“The beneficial effect of peanut consumption on risk of stroke, especially ischemic stroke was found, despite the small quantity of peanuts eaten by study participants,” Ikehara said. “The habit of eating peanuts and tree nuts is still not common in Asian countries. However, adding even a small amount to one’s diet could be a simple yet effective approach to help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.”

The American Heart Association recommends eating about five servings of unsalted nuts per week; one serving is ½ ounce (2 tablespoons) of nuts. Besides peanuts, the Association also says other healthy nut options include unsalted cashews, walnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts and hazelnuts.

Several limitations were noted in the study, including the validity and reliability of peanut consumption measurements in the data collection and analysis. Bias caused by these measurements may lead to errors in the association. However, a measurement error correction analysis was performed, and the associations proved to be accurate.

Source: American Heart Association

Marmalade-glazed Chicken Thighs

Ingredients

2 tbsp lemon juice
1 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
2 tsp chopped fresh rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper
8 boneless skinless chicken thighs (about 675 g)
2 tbsp orange marmalade, melted

Method

  1. In bowl, whisk together lemon juice, oil, rosemary, garlic, salt and pepper; set aside.
  2. Cut chicken thighs in half crosswise. Add to marinade, tossing to coat. Let stand for 15 minutes.
  3. Thread chicken onto eight pairs of soaked wooden skewers. Place on greased grill over medium heat. Brush with any remaining marinade. Close lid and grill, turning once, until juices run clear when chicken is pierced, 12 to 15 minutes.
  4. Brush with marmalade. Grill, turning, until glazed, about 1 minute.
  5. Serve with whole wheat couscous (see recipe below).

Makes 4 servings.


Whole Wheat Couscous With Parsley

  1. In heatproof bowl, pour 1-1/2 cups boiling water over 1 cup whole wheat couscous. Cover and let stand for 5 minutes. Fluff with fork.
  2. Whisk together 1 tbsp each lemon juice and extra-virgin olive oil, and 1/4 tsp each salt and pepper. Stir into couscous.
  3. Stir in 1/4 cup finely chopped fresh parsley before serving.

Source: The Complete Chicken Cookbook


Today’s Comic