Dessert: Mont Blanc Puddings of I Love Pudding in Japan

Original Mont Blanc Pudding

Pumpkin Mont Blanc Pudding

The price of both puddings is 500 yen (tax included).

To Improve Nutrition and Reduce the Burden of Disease, FDA Issues Food Industry Guidance for Voluntarily Reducing Sodium in Processed and Packaged Foods

Statement From:

Janet Woodcock, M.D.
Acting Commissioner of Food and Drugs – Food and Drug Administration

Susan T. Mayne, Ph.D.
Director – Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN)


A cornerstone of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s public health mission is to reduce the burden of chronic disease through improved nutrition. As a nation, we are facing a growing epidemic of preventable, diet-related conditions like cardiovascular disease, diabetes and obesity, and the agency’s work in this area has become even more urgent. For these reasons, we’re taking a critical step to further address preventable diet-related chronic diseases and advance health equity that we hope will become one of the most significant public health nutrition interventions in a generation.

Limiting certain nutrients, such as sodium, in our diets plays a crucial role in preventing diseases like hypertension and cardiovascular disease that disproportionately impact racial and ethnic minority groups; these diseases often result in hundreds of thousands of lives lost and billions in annual health care costs. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has only amplified these health disparities and the need for improved nutrition, as people with cardiovascular disease and other underlying conditions are at increased risk for severe outcomes from COVID-19.

For these reasons, we’re taking a critical step to further address preventable diet-related chronic diseases and advance health equity that we hope will become one of the most significant public health nutrition interventions in a generation.

Today, the FDA is issuing a final guidance, “Voluntary Sodium Reduction Goals: Target Mean and Upper Bound Concentrations for Sodium in Commercially Processed, Packaged, and Prepared Foods,” which provides voluntary short-term sodium reduction targets for food manufacturers, chain restaurants and food service operators for 163 categories of processed, packaged and prepared foods. The guidance is another step the agency is taking to advance the Administration’s whole-of-government approach to nutrition and health and improve future health outcomes.

By limiting certain nutrients like sodium in our diets, we can help prevent diseases like hypertension and cardiovascular disease that disproportionately impact racial and ethnic minority groups, often resulting in hundreds of thousands of lives lost and billions in annual health care costs. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has only amplified these health disparities and the need for improved nutrition, as people with cardiovascular disease and other underlying conditions are at increased risk for severe outcomes from COVID-19.

Research shows that people consume 50% more sodium than recommended. This includes our youngest and most vulnerable populations, with more than 95% of children aged 2 to 13 years old exceeding recommended limits of sodium for their age groups. Although many consumers may want to reduce their sodium intake, about 70% of the sodium we eat comes from packaged, processed and restaurant foods, making it challenging to limit sodium. Changes across the overall food supply will make it easier to access lower-sodium options and reduce intake even in the absence of behavior change.

The targets in the final guidance seek to decrease average sodium intake from approximately 3,400 milligrams (mg) to 3,000 mg per day, about a 12% reduction, over the next 2.5 years. Although the average intake would still be above the Dietary Guidelines for Americans’ recommended limit of 2,300 mg per day for those 14 and older, we know that even these modest reductions made slowly over the next few years will substantially decrease diet-related diseases.

The final guidance outlines short-term goals that we’re recommending the food industry work to meet as soon as possible to help optimize public health. We will continue our discussions with the food industry as we monitor the sodium content of the food supply to evaluate progress. In the future, we plan to issue revised, subsequent targets to further lower the sodium content incrementally and continue to help reduce sodium intake. This iterative approach will help support gradual reductions in sodium levels broadly across the food supply so that consumers’ tastes adjust, health outcomes improve and no one company or category of food is singled out or scrutinized. Voluntary and gradual approaches such as this have also been successful in other countries, such as Canada and the U.K.

We first proposed recommendations for reducing sodium content in a 2016 draft guidance. A number of companies in the food industry have already made changes to sodium content in their products, which is encouraging, but additional support across all types of foods to help consumers meet recommended sodium limits is needed. Today, consumers can take steps to lower their sodium intake by reading food labels, including the Nutrition Facts label, asking for nutrition information at chain restaurants, choosing lower sodium options and speaking with their health care providers about eating healthier foods.

The FDA is committed to playing its part with the tools available to us to help create a healthier food supply, promote healthy habits early and empower consumers to make healthier food choices. We have already taken steps through our Closer to Zero action plan for reducing exposure to toxic elements in foods commonly eaten by babies and young children to the lowest possible levels and have more work ahead using a similar iterative process. Many of our federal, state and local partners also have initiatives underway that support sodium reduction and help people achieve healthier eating patterns overall. If we act together, we can have a profound impact on the health of millions of people.

Source: FDA

My Food: I Cooked a Six-course Dinner for My 48th Wedding Anniversary

Cream of Cauliflower Soup, Snow Crab Legs

Strawberry, Spinach and Walnut Salad

Prosciutto Wrapped Asparagus, Balsamic Reduction Drizzle

Lobster Risotto

Dry Aged 28 Days Ribeye Steak, Assorted Vegetables

Brandied Coffee Jelly, Light Cream

Study: Risk of COVID from Grocery Store Surfaces Very Low

Your chances of getting COVID-19 from surfaces at the grocery store are minimal, a Canadian study reassures.

Researchers at the University of Guelph in Ontario collected 957 samples at four grocery stories over a month. None tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID, the study found.

In other words, high-touch surfaces like the handle of your shopping cart or the freezer door should be safe to touch in stores that follow good cleaning protocols.

“We believe that cleaning and disinfecting contact surfaces along with wearing masks significantly minimize the risk of transmission from surfaces in grocery stores to humans,” said Dr. Maria Corradini, an associate professor of food sciences.

Research early in the pandemic suggested the virus could survive on surfaces for hours or even days, leading many folks to wear gloves while shopping.

For this study, researchers swabbed not only the handles of grocery carts and baskets, but also payment terminals, conveyor belts at checkouts, the surfaces around deli counters and the plastic and metal handles in frozen food sections.

Then they did PCR (polymerase chain reaction) testing to look for the virus’ RNA.

It didn’t matter what time of day they tested or whether the store was in a city or a suburb, none of the samples tested positive for the virus.

“These results suggest that if stores enforce regular sanitizing routines and monitor the health of store personnel, the risk of exposure from high-touch surfaces within a grocery store is low,” Corradini said in a university news release.

The authors said their findings support those of the U.S. Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC found that while transmission of COVID-19 through surfaces is feasible, it is unlikely because the virus is typically spread through droplets or airborne transmission from infected people.

The study was recently published in the journal Current Research in Food Science.

Source: HealthDay

Saint-Honoré

Ingredients

Cake Base

4 tablespoons butter or margarine, melted and cooled
6 eggs, separated
6 tablespoons sugar
3/4 cup flour
1/4 oz vanilla sugar
1 teaspoon baking powder
maraschino
crème pâtissière (see below)
1 cup whipped cream
pan di Spagna (optional)
6-8 profiteroles (optional)
zabaglione (optional)

Saint-Honoré cream

1/2 oz gelatin
2 egg yolks
1/2/ cup sugar
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
1/4 oz vanilla sugar
3 egg whites
1-1/2 cups whipped cream
2 teaspoons cocoa powder

Method

  1. Make the pastry base. Melt the butter or margarine over moderate heat and let cool. In a bowl beat the egg yolks, reserving the whites, with the sugar for 15 minutes and add, a little at a time, the flour sifted with the vanilla sugar and baking powder. Fold the egg whites, beaten until stiff, and the melted fat gently into the mixture with a spatula. Spoon the mixture into a 12-inch cake pan, buttered and dusted with flour. and cook in a moderate oven (350°F) for 35-40 minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, make the crème pâtissière.
  3. Prepare the Saint-Honoré cream. Soften the gelatin in cold water. Beat the egg yolks with the sugar and stir in the flour and milk. Cook the cream, stirring constantly, over very low heat until it thickens but does not boil. Stir in the gelatin, remove from the heat, add the vanilla sugar and fold in the egg whites, beaten until stiff. Let cool and fold in 2/3 of the whipped cream.
  4. Divide the mixture into two parts and stir the sifted cocoa into one half. Slice the cake into 2 or 3 layers, sprinkle them generously with maraschino liqueur and cover with crème pâtissière, mixed with some of the cream. Brush cake with remaining whipped cream and press pan di Spagna (if using)against it. Using a pastry bag fitted with a large nozzle, make large rosettes of plain Saint-Honoré cream on top of cake, alternating with chocolate Saint Honoré cream. Fill profiteroles with zabaglione (if using), dip in caramel, made by dissolving 3 tbsp sugar slowly in water, then cooking until golden, and set around top of cake

Crème Pâtissière

In a bowl beat 2 egg yolks with 2 tablespoons sugar for about 15 minutes. Add 1-1/2 to 2 tablespoons flour and stir in 1 cup lukewarm milk, a little at a time. Add a little lemon peel and 1/2 tablespoon butter or margarine. Cook the cream, stirring constantly, until it thickens, without letting it boil. Remove the lemon peel before using.


Makes 6 to 8 servings.

Source: The Cook’s Book


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