New Coke with Coffee Launched in the U.S. Nationwide

Peter Pham wrote . . . . . . . . .

The new beverage, Coca-Cola with Coffee brings together the classic cola with rich coffee. Arriving in five variations, Coca-Cola with Coffee will be available in Dark Blend, Caramel and Vanilla. Coca Cola with Coffee Zero Sugar will be available in both Dark Blend and Vanilla.

Each 12-oz can features about 69 mg of caffeine, slightly under the amount of a regular cup of coffee.

Source: Foodbeast

In Pictures: Artistic Parfait

Ring in the New Year with a ‘Mocktail’

Thor Christensen wrote . . . . . . . . .

At a time when many people are stress-drinking, a New Year’s Eve sangria that’s alcohol-free is a healthy way to say farewell to 2020.

Filled with vitamins and fiber, this fresh fruit “mocktail” recipe is a nutritious alternative to what people usually drink before and after singing “Auld Lang Syne.”

“It’s got benefits that make it a better choice than a glass of wine or beer or a mixed drink,” said Catherine Champagne, a professor of nutritional epidemiology at the Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Sipping an alcoholic drink or two is a time-honored holiday tradition. But excessive drinking can weaken the immune system and increase the risk of liver disease, certain cancers and heart damage, according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. It also affects brain functions like rational thinking, an important factor in following safety guidance to stop the spread of COVID-19.

A glass of alcohol-free sangria, on the other hand, offers a wide range of vitamins, including C and K, and antioxidants like beta carotene.

“It also has a ton of potassium, which is one of the hallmarks of the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, which is good for lowering blood pressure,” Champagne said. “Potassium is not something you would necessarily find in an alcoholic drink or even a soda.”

The fresh fruit sangria calls for either 3 cups of unsweetened cranberry and apple juice blend or 2 cups of 100% cranberry juice and 1 cup unsweetened apple juice.

Just make sure to choose 100% cranberry juice with no added sugar, Champagne said. “You don’t want any added cane sugar, high fructose corn syrup or any other sugar that isn’t associated with the fruit itself.” Added sugars lack nutrients and add calories that can lead to weight gain, obesity and other health problems.

Thanks to the berries and chopped apples in the recipe, each glass of sangria has more than 2 grams of fiber – a small but significant step in reaching the recommended amount of daily fiber, which varies by age and sex. For example, federal dietary guidelines advise women in their 30s and 40s to get about 25 grams a day, while men in the same age group should get about 31 grams a day.

So, grab a spoon and eat every last bite of fruit after you’ve finished the juice, Champagne said.

“Fiber is important for good colon and cardiovascular health, and the average American diet does not contain enough of it.”

Source: American Heart Association

Video: Will It Kombucha?

Kombucha is a bubbly, fermented tea that has gained popularity in the health and wellness scene over the last decade –– but what is it exactly?

This video breaks down kombucha’s chemistry and investigates which ordinary beverages they can turn into kombucha.

Watch video at You Tube (8:32 minutes) . . . . .

Study: Sugary Drinks’ Effect on Hormones Could Spur Weight Gain

It could be more than just added calories: New research gives insight into why sugary drinks are a leading cause of obesity.

Sugar-sweetened drinks are the largest source of calories from added sugar for U.S. adults, and researchers now report that the drinks also hinder hormones that quell hunger and regulate appetite.

“Our study found that when young adults consumed drinks containing sucrose, they produced lower levels of appetite-regulating hormones than when they consumed drinks containing glucose — the main type of sugar that circulates in the bloodstream,” said researcher Dr. Kathleen Page. She’s an associate professor of medicine specializing in diabetes and childhood obesity at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine.

The study included 69 adults, aged 18 to 35, who consumed drinks containing either sucrose or glucose during two separate sessions. Sucrose is a combination of glucose and fructose from sugar cane or sugar beets. Glucose is found in honey, grapes, figs and plums.

Blood samples were taken from the study participants 10, 35 and 120 minutes after they had the drinks. When they consumed drinks with sucrose, they produced lower amounts of hormones that suppress hunger than when they had drinks with an equal amount of glucose, the findings showed.

The researchers also found that factors such as body weight and sex affected how the different types of sugars affected those hormones.

For example, obese people and those with lower insulin sensitivity had a smaller rise in hunger-suppressing hormones after they had drinks sweetened with sucrose than when they had drinks with glucose.

The study was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The findings don’t mean that you should switch from one type of sweet drink to another, but that you should try to cut back on any type of added sugar, according to Page, head of the university’s Diabetes and Obesity Research Institute.

“The majority of sucrose that people consume in the American diet comes from sugar-sweetened foods and beverages, whereas glucose is found naturally in most carbohydrate-containing foods, including fruits and whole grain breads,” she said in a university news release.

“I would advise reducing the consumption of sugar-sweetened foods and beverages and instead trying to eat more whole foods, like fruits,” Page added.

Source: HealthDay