Side Effects of Apple Cider Vinegar

Timothy Huzar wrote . . . . . . . . .

Research suggests that apple cider vinegar may have several health benefits. However, consuming too much vinegar can cause unwanted effects.

Apple cider vinegar is a common ingredient in food dressings, flavorings, and preservatives. It is also becoming popular as a home remedy for a number of health issues.

According to a 2016 review, several studies indicate that vinegar, including apple cider vinegar, have the potential to help treat a range of conditions, including obesity, heart disease, cancer, and bacterial infections.

However, there is little research on the most healthful way to consume vinegar and how much to take.

In particular, very few studies have explored the potential side effects or complications of regularly consuming vinegar.

In this article, we discuss possible adverse effects of using apple cider vinegar as a remedy and give some tips about how to do it safely.

Tooth decay

Like all vinegar, apple cider vinegar is acidic. Consuming too many acidic foods and beverages can weaken tooth enamel over time, potentially leading to tooth decay.

At first, people may not realize that their tooth enamel is damaged. As the damage worsens, the teeth may start to ache or become sensitive to sweet foods and hot or cold temperatures, according to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. Eventually, the teeth may develop cavities that require fillings.

The risk of tooth decay is highest when a person regularly consumes undiluted apple cider vinegar. Diluting the vinegar or consuming it as part of a meal reduces this risk.

Low potassium

According to Dr. Robert H. Shmerling, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medicine School in Boston, MA, there have been reports of apple cider vinegar causing or worsening low potassium levels.

The medical name for low potassium is hypokalemia. A person with mild hypokalemia may not have any symptoms. However, moderate or severe hypokalemia can cause muscle weakness and paralysis, which can affect many parts of the body.

If a person experiences muscle problems, especially issues relating to the heart or breathing, they should seek medical attention immediately.

Blood sugar regulation

Some research suggests that consuming vinegar can affect how the body regulates blood sugar levels. However, scientists do not fully understand this effect and more research is needed.

Anyone with diabetes should speak to a medical professional before trying a high-vinegar diet.

Gastrointestinal issues

Many people recommend vinegar as a natural weight loss aid. Research suggests that it helps slows the rate at which food leaves the stomach, which can suppress the appetite by making a person feel fuller for longer.

However, keeping food in the stomach can cause unwanted side effects. In a study that investigated the potential for vinegar to control the appetite, many participants reported feelings of nausea and indigestion after drinking vinegar with breakfast.

Because of the acidity, drinking undiluted apple cider vinegar can also worsen symptoms in people with digestive problems, such as stomach ulcers or acid reflux.

Skin burns

The acidity of vinegar means that applying it directly to the skin can cause burns and irritation, especially if the vinegar is undiluted.

The National Capital Poison Center lists a number of medical reports in which people experienced serious burns that required medical treatment after using vinegar, including apple cider vinegar, on the skin.

A report in The Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology describes a case in which a teenager sustained chemical burns on her nose after applying apple cider vinegar to remove two moles.

Tips for safe usage

A person is more likely to experience side effects if they regularly consume large quantities of undiluted vinegar or leave it on the skin for long periods.

To lower the risk of unwanted effects, try:

  • reducing the quantity of vinegar consumed
  • reducing the amount of time that vinegar touches the skin
  • diluting the vinegar with water or using it as an ingredient
  • limiting contact with the teeth, such as by drinking the vinegar through a straw

A 2016 review found that people may be able to achieve many of the potential health benefits by drinking around 15 milliliters of vinegar a day or any quantity that contains around 750 milligrams of acetic acid.

However, because of the lack of research into side effects and long-term safety, further moderation may be the best approach.

People with digestive issues, low potassium levels, or diabetes should consider speaking to a doctor before consuming apple cider vinegar.

Anyone who experiences severe side effects should consult a medical professional.

Source: Medical News Today

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In Pictures: Food of New French Restaurants in Japan

Hong Kong Food Critic Said He Wishes Hotpot Would Vanish from the World

From The Guardian . . . . . . . . .

A famous Hong Kong restaurant critic and TV personality known as the “Food God” has found himself in hot water – or a steaming vat of hot broth – after criticising the much beloved dish Chinese hotpot.

Chua Lam, a critic who is also the author of several cook books, made the comments during an appearance on the Chinese talk show Day Day Up.

He was asked by one of the hosts what dish he would like to see vanish from the world and said: “hotpot”.

“Because hotpot is a cooking method totally lacking cultural significance. You just throw some ingredients into a pot. I don’t get what’s delicious about it,” he said. “If hotpot fandom continues to grow, you’ll see fewer and fewer chefs in the years to come.”

Hotpot is a popular Chinese dish that is eaten communally, with people putting raw meat, vegetables and noodles into a shared pot of hot seasoned broth. Eating hotpot is often a social occasion, with groups gathering around and eating from the same pot.

Chua’s comments about the beloved dish prompted shocked reactions among the other panellists, one of whom exclaimed: “Many people love hotpot!”

Responding on Chinese social media, many viewers were outraged by the attack on the dish. One said: “Chinese hotpot has an abundance of cultural significance, from its broth to the order that you put ingredients into various sauces. Trashing hotpot exposed your ignorance and your inability to discover cultural details in things.”

Another suggested that Chua had “never had a good hotpot. I feel sorry for him.”

Hotpot was the subject of controversy earlier in the week when Australian metalcore guitarist and vegan advocate Jona Weinhofen tweeted a picture of hotpot saying “Meat eaters be like ‘vegan food looks and tastes gross.’ And then eat something that looks like leftover dishwater.”

Weinhofen’s tweet was criticised for its cultural insensitivity and for not acknowledging that hotpot can be made from entirely vegan ingredients; and for being classist, as hotpot developed as a way for working-class people to make their supply of meat and vegetables stretch further.

Jeff Yang, an American columnist, wrote that Weinhofen’s comment was an example of “neocolonialist” beliefs about food.

“Can we talk about white veganism for a second? The kind espoused by folks like Jona here, who begins his Twitter bio with the Sanskrit word for ‘non-violence’ but then craps on Asian cultural expressions in order to advance his neocolonial beliefs?” he wrote.

Source: SCMP

In Pictures: One-person Hotpot of Restaurants in Japan

New Portion Size Guide Tells You How Much You Should Actually be Eating

James Rogers wrote . . . . . . . . .

Nutritionists have launched a brand-new portion size guide to tackle overeating.

The British Nutrition Foundation’s (BNF) guide spells out how much of each sort of food.

The guide includes starchy carbohydrates, protein, dairy, fruit and vegetables and oils and spreads.

The aim of the guide is to revolutionise our eating and tackle the obesity crisis.

It takes into account the foods we should be eating – and in which portions – to have a healthy diet.

Women should be eating 2,000 calories a day – and men 2,500.

According to the guide, the correct portion size for pasta is two hands cupped together.

A finger and thumb, meanwhile, is the right thickness of spaghetti.

The right amount of cheese, more worryingly for cheese lovers, is a mere two thumbs.

The suggested single portion of a grilled chicken breast, a cooked salmon fillet or a cooked steak is “about half the size of your hand”.

A baked potato should be the “about the size of your fist”.

The BNF survey suggested that when it comes to eating pasta, on average we eat around 230g worth when cooked.

And that’s without any sauces or sides.

Researchers found that 10% of the people questioned eat 350g.

That’s around 500 calories alone, but their recommendation is 180g.

A portion of fruit or vegetables – of which we should eat at least five a day – could be two plums, two satsumas, seven strawberries, three heaped serving spoons of peas or carrots, one medium tomato or three sticks of celery.

But it’s not all bad news.

If you do fancy a snack, you’re still allowed them – but you are told to keep them small.

They should be around 100 to 150 calories, and not too frequent.

Examples included a small chocolate biscuit bar, a small multipack bag of crisps, four small squares of chocolate (20g) or a mini muffin.

Bridget Benelam, nutrition communications manager at the BNF, said: “More often than not, portion size is not something people give much thought to.

“The amount we put on our plate typically depends on the portion sizes we are used to consuming, how hungry we feel and how much is offered as a helping at a restaurant table or in a packet/ready meal.

“Nonetheless, in order to maintain a healthy weight we should ensure that our diets contain the right balance of foods, in sensible amounts.

“This isn’t just about eating less; it’s also about eating differently.”

Louis Levy, head of nutrition sciences at Public Health England, said: “The Eatwell Guide, the nation’s healthy eating model, shows the proportion of foods that should be consumed from each food group for a healthy balanced diet.

“With the exception of fruit and vegetables, fish and red and processed meat, the government does not provide guidance on specific food portion sizes as there is no evidence to make recommendations at a population level.”

Source: Birmingham Live


Read also at British Nutrition Foundation:

Find your balance, get portion wise! . . . . .