Video: 3D Printed Plant-based Steak

NOVAMEAT is a startup aiming to provide new solutions to feed the planet’s growing population with plant-based meat products, overcoming the current unsustainable and inefficient livestock system by creating a healthy, efficient, humane and sustainable food supply.

To achieve this vision, NOVAMEAT’s main mission is to develop cutting-edge technology to produce and commercialize plant-based micro-extruded fibrous meat products that are accessible, safe, scalable, and of high quality, thanks to its proprietary technology.

Watch video at You Tube (2:45 minutes) . . . . .


Read also at Plant Based News:

Harvesting The Long-Term Power Of Plant-Based Meat Alternatives . . . . .

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In Pictures: Protein-packed Plant-based Salad

Spinach Salad with Baked Tofu and Carrot Ginger Dressing

Tahini Quinoa Bean Salad

Mango, Grilled Corn and Black Bean Salad

Red, White & Blueberry Quinoa Salad

Summer Corn Wheat Berry Salad

Lemon Mint Quinoa Salad from Tofu ‘n Sprouts

Spicy Couscous and Chickpea Salad

Why You Should Eat Beans For Dessert

Kat Thompson wrote . . . . . . . . .

Here are all the places you might expect to find beans: on a Mexican plate lunch, covered in cheese and adjacent to enchiladas and rice; swimming in a pool of chili; or sweet-and-salty and piled on toast the way Brits and Aussies prefer in the AM. But beans, more often than not, are overlooked for a meal they absolutely shine in: dessert.

Growing up, I spent the majority of my weekends at the local Thai temple, where it was routine for me to buy a bowl of sticky mung bean pudding glazed with salted coconut milk to cap off my Thai lessons. The dessert, called tau suan in Thai, is also served in Singapore and China, where it is occasionally used as a dip for Chinese crullers or speckled with crunchy water chestnuts.

Mung beans are versatile, and present in a number of other Thai desserts. There’s luk chup, a mung bean confection shaped to look like traditional Thai fruits and vegetables and sealed in a shiny gelatin glaze. There’s also khanom mo kaeng tua, a baked mung bean custard comparable to flan that is topped with savory fried shallots. The yellow beans also find themselves in Vietnamese che bau mau, a parfait-like dessert layered with ice, coconut milk, pandan jelly, and another superstar in the world of dessert beans: red beans.

Red beans, which are sometimes referred to as adzuki beans, are prominent in both Japanese and Chinese desserts. It can be made into a paste, called anko in Japanese, which is then stuffed in mochi and moon cakes or slathered between honeyed pancakes in a dessert called dorayaki. In the Philippines, it’s included in shaved ice sundaes — alongside flan, scoops of ube and coconut ice cream, and jellies — known as halo-halo.

The flavor of red beans is earthy but naturally sweet and the texture, when blended, is smooth — almost like a sweet potato or yam that has been condensed into a tiny bean form. Red bean has also been used in ice cream, popsicles, and as a topping on fluffy domes of shaved ice. In fact, the flavor is so popular throughout Asia that McDonald’s has even plugged the paste within its famous, flaky pie crust in Hong Kong, Singapore, and Japan.

Sweets containing beans are not just a phenomenon that exist within Asia. Red beans make their way into habichuela con dulce, a creamy blend of beans, sweet potatoes, coconut milk, and evaporated milk from the Dominican Republic that is topped with cookies, raisins, and cinnamon and commonly eaten during Easter.

In southern states across the US, navy bean pie, an alternative to sweet potato pie, is quite popular. Associated with the Muslim African American community, the pie features a custard bean filling flavored with cinnamon and nutmeg. “One theory behind the bean pie’s potent symbolism is that it not only uses Muhammad’s beloved navy beans but is also believed to use them as a replacement for sweet potatoes, one of the most prominent symbols of traditional black cooking and a direct relic of the so-called ‘slave diet,’” wrote Rossi Anastopoulo for TASTE. “In some ways, swapping sweet potatoes for navy beans in a pie was akin to replacing one’s slave name with an X, as Muslim American historian Zaheer Ali has proposed.”

Beyond red beans, mung beans, and navy beans, black beans also make an appearance in a number of sweets. There’s black bean pudding soup with sago in a coconut milk broth (a Hong Kong classic), sticky rice studded with black beans and wrapped in banana leaves, as well as a black bean and rice pudding topped with coconut milk.

The reason that beans are so commonly found in desserts throughout the world have a lot to do with access to ingredients; every culture, no matter what corner of the Earth they’re from, has recipes that include beans in them. “Beans contain multitudes: They’re sturdy, reliable, versatile, an affordable vegetarian protein source,” notes The Cut. Why not add sugar to those beans and make a treat out of them?

It’s also not surprising that beans are highlighted in sweets from Asia, where the majority of people shy away from rich butter, milk, and dairy-based desserts. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, roughly 65% of adults struggle to digest lactose after infancy. That number is even higher for those of East Asian descent, where more than 90% of adults are affected. A simple solution for preventing a stomach ache from ice cream or creme brulee is to avoid those types of desserts entirely; bean-based desserts laced with coconut milk are not only lactose-free, but tend to be vegan, too.

If you’ve never before considered beans to be a remarkable ingredient for dessert, reconsider: it’s bean proven to make an excellent addition to any sweet treat.

Source: Thrillist

Restaurant Robot with Swappable Tray System

Chris Albrecht wrote . . . . . . . . .

Bear Robotics has officially launched the second-generation version of its Penny restaurant robot. The autonomous robot, which shuttles food and dishes between the front and back of house, now features a versatile tray system for carrying more and different types of items.

With its new design, Penny has lost its bowling pin shape and single carrying surface. Instead, Penny 2.0 is more cylindrical in shape, and can sport up to three tiers of carrying surface. Not only can Penny carry more, a new swappable tray system means it can be configured to carry any combination of food, drinks or bus tub.

On the inside, Bear updated the smarts of Penny, giving the robot enhanced obstacle-avoidance technology, and while the company didn’t go into specifics, a tablet can now be attached to Penny for expanded customer interaction capabilities.

Penny 2.0 is being shown at the National Restaurant Association trade show this weekend and is available now. While Bear doesn’t disclose actual pricing, Penny is offered on a monthly subscription, which includes the robot, setup and mapping of a restaurant and technical support.

Penny is among a wave of robots coming to restaurants in the near future: Flippy makes burgers and fries up chicken tenders, Dishcraft is still stealthily working on automating tasks in the kitchen, and there are entire establishments like Creator and Spyce built around robotic cooking systems.

Any discussion of automation always involves the loss of human jobs. John Ha, CEO of Bear Robotics, actually owned a restaurant and built Penny after noticing how hard servers work, often for little pay. By automating the expediting of food and bussing, Bear aims to free up humans to provide higher levels of customer service (ideally earning those humans higher tips).

Source: The Spoon

In Pictures: Home-cooked Breakfasts