How to Make Turkey Stock After Thanksgiving

Katie Workman wrote . . . . . . . . .

Making turkey stock is a great way to use what you have on hand post-Thanksgiving. It’s easy and economical: Almost all leftover parts of the bird can be put to use, including the bones, the skin, and small bits of meat attached to the carcass.

Just place them into a large soup pot with a generous amount of water. Add some basic vegetables and simmer away for at least an hour. Skim, strain, and you have stock.

The longer you simmer it, the more the stock reduces, becoming deeper and richer in flavor and slightly darker in color.

Anything but the giblets and the liver can be added to the pot. It’s a less wasteful, more respectful way to enjoy meat. And these days, with inflation, we are all trying to stretch our food-buying dollars.

So buy that slightly larger-size turkey. When your house smells like Thanksgiving once again the next day, you can start to daydream about all of the ways you’ll put that stock to use.

Homemade stock will improve any soup, sauce and dish you use it in. While there are plenty of decent canned and boxed stocks and broth, nothing compares to the flavor of homemade. You can taste the freshness of the ingredients, even though they have been well-simmered and melded.

The vegetables used in stock can be as simple as onions, carrots and celery, maybe some fresh herbs. Or you can add a broader range of vegetables. If you’re a dedicated stock maker, keep vegetable scraps in a sturdy sealed bag in the freezer. Don’t overlook the stems of fresh herbs and peelings from various cleaned vegetables. Another smart economical kitchen practice.

Steer away from distinctively flavored vegetables like broccoli, asparagus or mushrooms, unless you are prepared for a potently flavored broth. Same for members of the cabbage family, like Brussels sprouts. Be thoughtful about adding garlic, which can overpower the flavor of the stock if used in large quantities. And red beets will affect the color in an obvious way!

Other ingredients can be added if you intend to use your stock in a particular way. An Asian-inspired stock benefits from the addition of fresh ginger or perhaps lemongrass, for instance.

Tips for Making Stock:

Don’t allow the stock to come to a boil. This can cause cloudiness, and also make it difficult to “defat” the stock later, as the fat will not congeal as well on top when cooled for easy removal. Keep the stock at a gentle simmer, with the bubbles slowly appearing at the surface.

Source: AP

 

 

 

 

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In Pictures: Thanksgiving Desserts

 

 

 

 

Home-cooked Dinner

The Menu

  • Seafood Noodle Soup
  • Daikon Salad
  • Grilled Welsh Onion
  • Caramel Apple Crepe

 

 

 

 

Green Beans Can be One of the Healthiest Dishes at the Holiday Table

Laura Williamson wrote . . . . . . . . .

Whether served in a casserole, almondine or roasted with garlic, green beans are sure to make an appearance on many a table this holiday season.

And unlike many of the tempting treats that make up holiday meals, the green bean is one item that’s not usually served with a side of guilt. In fact, it may be the Mighty Mouse of the holiday meal – here to save the day from a beckoning bounty of otherwise fat-laden, calorie-rich foods.

“If not prepared with higher-calorie ingredients, you can eat a large volume of them and feel fuller without overconsuming,” said Maya Vadiveloo, an associate professor in the department of nutrition and food services at the University of Rhode Island in Kingston.

There’s little the mighty green bean can’t do.

Not only are they relatively inexpensive, green beans are rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene, an antioxidant that gives fruits and vegetables their color. The vegetable helps fight inflammation and is a good source of folate and potassium, which helps regulate blood pressure. Green beans also are a good source of protein and fiber, which helps lower cholesterol, Vadiveloo said.

“Fiber is underconsumed by U.S. adults and children, and it’s good for gut health,” she said. “(Fiber) is great for reducing colon cancer risk.”

But whether the green bean delivers its health benefits without also doing harm depends on how the vegetable is prepared, Vadiveloo said.

Boiling the beans removes a lot of nutrients – and a lot of taste, she said.

Vadiveloo recommends cooking them in heart-healthy oils, such as olive oil, or any non-tropical vegetable oil, rather than fatback. If making a casserole, heavy creams or creamy soups can be replaced with Greek yogurt or low-fat milk. For those who want a little cheese on top, she suggests sprinkling cheese instead of pouring it on.

And to maintain the blood pressure-lowering benefits, “don’t put too much salt on them,” she said. “Use other seasoning. I like eating them Szechuan style with cayenne pepper. Or dipping raw green beans in hummus.”

The type of green bean also matters, Vadiveloo said. Fresh or flash frozen is best.

“That said, if what’s available to you is canned green beans and you are picking between that and a non-vegetable,” she said, “I would encourage people to select the canned variety.”

But try to grab the low-sodium option.

What’s most important about maintaining good health at holiday meals, Vadiveloo said, is balance.

“If there are things people really, really like, if it’s a holiday favorite or something your aunt brought to the table and you really crave it, go ahead and have some,” she said. “But balance it out with healthier sides and only take a little.”

Source: American Heart Association

 

 

 

 

Home-cooked Vegetarian Dinner

The Menu

  • Miso Soup
  • Stir-fried Gluten and Vegetables
  • Steamed Daikon
  • Chinese Cabbage Kimchi
  • Brown Rice with Adzuki Beans