Chinese Hakka-style Stir Fried Bitter Gourd with Salted Egg

Ingredients

1 bitter gourd
1 salted egg
1 preserved egg
2 cloves garlic, sliced
1 stalk spring onion, chopped
1 tsp crushed rock sugar
1/2 tsp salt
gound white pepper

Method

  1. Wash bitter gourd, cut into to halves lengthwise, clear out rind and seeds, and cut into thick slices.
  2. Hard boil salted egg, separate egg white from yoke, cut egg white into small pieces and crush the yoke.
  3. Shell preserved egg and cut into small pieces.
  4. Brown garlic slices in 1 tablespoon of oil under medium heat, put in salted egg white and bitter gourd, toss and add salt, crushed rock sugar and 1/2 cup water, cover and stew for 2 minutes.
  5. Remove lid, stir in preserved egg and salted egg yoke, cook until sauce thickens. Add spring onion and white pepper before serving.

Source: Hakka Cuisine

Chinese Hakka Style Mini Pork Omelet Pot

Ingredients

150 g ground pork
3 eggs
400 g Lo Bok
1 bunch Chinese celery
1 cup chicken broth
2 slices ginger
1 tsp corn starch
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp sugar
1 tsp light soy sauce
dash white pepper

Method

  1. Add 2 tablespoons of water to the cornstarch, let settled. Pour away the water leaving behind some wet starch.
  2. Add light soy sauce, sugar, white pepper and 1 tablespoon water to the ground pork and marinate for 15 minutes. Pan-fry pork and drain excess oil and water.
  3. Beat eggs, add wet starch and 1/2 teaspoon salt, mix well and run through a wire strainer.
  4. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a wok under low medium heat, put in 1 tablespoon of stirred egg batter and let it form a round omelet at the center of the wok.
  5. Put 1 tablespoon ground pork onto one side of the omelet, shake the wok lightly to prevent omelet from sticking.
  6. Fold one side of the round omelet to the other side to form a half moon shape omelet. Repeat until all the egg batter are cooked.
  7. Peel the Lo Bok and cut into chunks and cut Chinese celery into sections.
  8. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a clay pot and stir-fry the ginger slices briefly. Add Lo Bok, 1/2 teaspoon salt and chicken broth. Bring to a boil and cook for 10 minutes under low heat.
  9. Add Chinese celery and cook for another minute.
  10. Place omelets on top of Lo Bok and Chinese celery, and bring to a boil before serving.

Source: Hakka Cuisine

Chinese-style Love Birds Shrimp

Ingredients

1-1/4 lb large shrimp
1 tablespoon cornstarch
1/2 egg white, beaten
oil for deep-frying
1/4 lb snow peas, ends trimmed
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon sugar
1 scallion, finely chopped
1 teaspoon finely chopped ginger
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon Shaoxing rice wine
1/2 teaspoon roasted sesame oil
1 tablespoon chile bean paste (toban jiang)
1 tablespoon tomato paste

Method

  1. Peel and devein the shrimp, leaving the tails intact.
  2. Combine the cornstarch with enough Water to make a paste. Stir in the egg white and a pinch of salt, then stir in the shrimp.
  3. Fill a wok one quarter full of oil. Heat the oil to 350°F, or until a piece of bread fries golden brown in 15 seconds when dropped in the oil. Cook the shrimp for 1 minute, stirring to separate them. Remove the shrimp from the wok with a wire strainer or slotted spoon as soon as the color changes, then drain. Pour the oil out, reserving 1 tablespoon.
  4. Reheat the reserved oil over high heat until very hot and stir-fry the snow peas with the salt and sugar for 1-1/2 minutes. Remove and place in the center of a serving platter.
  5. Reheat the wok again and stir-fry the scallion and ginger for a few seconds. Add the shrimps, soy sauce and rice wine, blend well and stir-fry for about 30 seconds, then add the sesame oil. Transfer about half of the shrimp to one end of the serving platter.
  6. Add the chile bean paste and tomato puree to the remaining shrimps, blend well, tossing to coat the shrimp, then transfer the shrimp to the other end of the platter.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: The Food of China

Sweet Brown Rice Porridge with Sweet Corn and Chestnut

Ingredients

1/2 cup sweet corn kernels
152 g shelled chestnuts
8 red dates (seeded)
4 shelled dried longans
1/2 cup brown rice
sugar to taste

Method

  1. Rinse the sweet corn kernels, red dates and dried longans.
  2. Rinse the brown rice.
  3. Soak chestnuts in boiling hot water for a while. Then peel them.
  4. Boil 10 cups of water. Add sweet corn kernels, chestnuts, red dates, dried longans and brown rice.
  5. Bring to the boil again and switch to low heat. Simmer for 1-1/2 hours. Season with sugar. Serve hot.

Source: Tasty Low-fat Desserts

Chinese Shanghai-style Soy Duck

Ingredients

4-1/2 lb duck
2 teaspoons salt
4 scallions, each tied in a knot
4 x 1/2-inch slices ginger, smashed with the flat side of a cleaver
6 star anise
3 cinnamon or cassia sticks
1 tablespoon Sichuan peppercorns
1/2 cup Shaoxing rice wine
3/4 cup light soy sauce
1/2 cup dark soy sauce
3 oz rock sugar

Method

  1. Rinse the duck, drain, and remove any fat from the cavity opening and around the neck. Cut off and discard the tail.
  2. Blanch the duck in a saucepan of boiling water for 2-3 minutes, then refresh in cold water, pat dry and rub the salt inside the cavity.
  3. Place the duck, breast side up, in a clay pot or braising pan, and add the scallions, ginger, star anise, cinnamon, peppercorns, rice wine, soy sauces, rock sugar and enough water to cover. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for 40-45 minutes. Turn off the heat and allow the duck to cool in the liquid for 2-3 hours, transferring the clay pot to the fridge once it is cool enough.
  4. Keep in the fridge until completely cold (you can keep the duck in the liquid overnight and serve it the next day).
  5. To serve, remove the duck from the liquid and drain well. Using a cleaver, cut the duck through the bones into bite-size pieces.
  6. Traditionally, this dish is served at room temperature, but if you would like to serve it hot, put the clay pot with the duck and the liquid back on the stove and bring it to a boil. Simmer for 10 minutes, or until the duck is completely heated through.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Source: The Food of China