Video: How to Make Hollandaise Sauce from the Delmonico Restaurant that Created Eggs Benedict

Watch video at Business Insider (1:55 minutes) . . . . .


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Delmonico’s Eggs Benedict . . . . .

The Golden Rules of Grilling

 

Dan Gentile wrote . . . . . . .

Backyard cooks often stumble onto these lessons via trial and error, but to speed along the learning, we asked grill-obsessed chefs for rules that they always follow. Now go and do unto thy burgers as you’d have them do unto you.

Fear neither salt nor fat

“Several days prior to grilling any beef, I’ll salt it and put it on a drying rack in the fridge for at least 24 hours. This draws the moisture out and really aids in creating a great crust. Then I’ll brush the meat with melted tallow. Using rendered beef fat in place of butter makes a ton of sense, and it’s cheap and easy to get from any butcher or grocer.” — Trey Bell, LaRue Elm, (Greensboro, North Carolina)

Tread lightly with sauce

“Save the sauce! Barbecue sauce is best served on the side as a condiment. If you put it on the meat over a hot fire it’ll burn easily, and nobody likes that.” — Ray Lampe, aka Dr. BBQ (Saint Petersburg, Florida)

Don’t covet thy neighbor’s grill

“Of all the methods of cooking, grilling is easily the one with the most back-seat drivers. Just like too many cooks in the kitchen, too many bros around a fire can be the undoing of your ember-kissed edibles. Not much is worse than trying to get in the zone, only to have Biff from accounting instruct you on the proper methods of burger-flipping. My line is this: ‘I’ll handle this. That way it’s only my fault if it sucks.’ You have to take control! Get a wing-person to distract gawkers and back-seat grillers away from your food foundry. Have the wing-person deliver the toasty treats to a place away from the grill. I’m not saying you have to be antisocial. Once the cooking is done, bask in the praises of those you have fed.” — Justin Warner, author of The Laws of Cooking: And How to Break Them, host of Chef Shock (Brooklyn, New York)

Stay away from lighter fluid, unless you like the taste

“Chimney starters are always preferred over lighter fluid — they make for a cleaner cook.” – Takuya “Tako” Matsumoto, Kemuri Tatsu-ya, (Austin, Texas)

Indirect heat is thy friend

“I like to put all the coals on one side of the grill. Skin-on chicken thighs are my favorite, and I like to roast them on the complete opposite side of the grill where there’s no flame. The indirect heat slow roasts them and makes the skin really crispy.” — Chris Shepherd, chef/owner of Underbelly, One Fifth, Hay Merchant (Houston, Texas)

Don’t leave meat in the cold

“Always take your protein out of the refrigerator a couple hours before grilling to allow it to come to room temperature. A room-temperature piece of meat cooks a lot more evenly than something right out of the refrigerator.” — Mark Dommen, One Market Restaurant (San Francisco, California)

Do not gamble with germs

“Wrap your platter with plastic wrap before taking raw meat out to the grill. After the meat is on the grill, you can remove and discard the plastic wrap. That way, you can use the same platter for serving the cooked meat. And you don’t need to wash your tongs: If they touch the raw burger, it’s OK — the heat of the burger sterilizes the tongs.” — Steven Raichlen, author and TV host of Project Smoke (Chappaquiddick Island, Massachusetts)

Rotate your meat to make a feast for the mouth and the eyes

“To achieve perfect grill marks, do a quarter turn on your patty at the two-minute mark, flip it over after four minutes, then at the six-minute mark do another quarter turn and add any topping such as cheese or caramelized onions. Finally at eight minutes, remove from the grill and enjoy.” — Steven Banbury, HopDoddy Burger Bar (Austin, Texas)

Don’t block the spatchcock

“At Flip Bird, the golden rule is to first spatchcock the bird. By removing the backbone, butterflying, and flattening the chicken, the meat will cook faster and both the breast and the leg finish at the same time while remaining moist and flavorful.” — John Stage, Dinosaur Bar-B-Que and Flip Bird (multiple locations throughout New York)

Have patience with coals

“Make sure the coals are cooked down to the white ash, otherwise the charcoal flavor is too pronounced. I like when it’s still very hot, but has a beautiful amber glow with white ash. The perfect temperature.” — David Myers, Gypsy Chef at Salt Water Kitchen, Adrift, and more (Los Angeles, California)

Fear not other cultures

“A few of my favorite ingredients to grill with are lemongrass and fish sauce. Lemongrass is a beautiful aromatic to add brightness to a dish without the introduction of acid. When acid is present, it usually turns bitter when exposed to an open flame. Lemongrass doesn’t do that, instead it becomes brighter as the flavor is extracted over heat. Fish sauce is used as a complex salt and seasoning in Southeast Asia. It’s better than salt because when you use fish sauce you’re not just adding sodium, but also giving the dish more umami.” — Tu David Phu, chef behind An: Vietnamese Dining Experience (San Francisco, CA)

Source: Thrillist

Nutritional Properties of Mushrooms are Better Preserved When They are Grilled or Microwaved

Mushrooms are considered valuable health foods, since they have a significant amount of dietary fiber and are poor in calories and fat. Moreover, they have a good protein content (20–30% of dry matter) which includes most of the essential amino acids; also provide a nutritionally significant content of vitamins (B1, B2, B12, C, D and E) and trace minerals such as zinc or selenium. Mushrooms are also an important source of biologically active compounds with potential medicinal value such as betaglucans.

The most mushrooms are commonly cooked before being consumed. Scientists from Mushroom Technological Research Center of La Rioja (CTICH) aimed to evaluate the influence of different cooking methods (boiling, microwaving, grilling and frying) on proximate composition, betaglucans content and antioxidant activity of four cultivated mushrooms species.

The study was conducted on the most widely consumed mushrooms worldwide: Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom), Lentinula edodes (shiitake), Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) and Pleurotus eryngii (king oyster mushroom). They were harvested from the cultivation rooms at CTICH facilities. After the cooking process, raw and cooked mushrooms were then freeze-dried, and the proximate composition and the antioxidant activity were analyzed.

The results of this study, published in the International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, revealed that frying induced more severe losses in protein, ash, and carbohydrates content but increased the fat and energy. Boiling improved the total glucans content by enhancing the betaglucans fraction. A significant decrease was detected in the antioxidant activity especially after boiling and frying, while grilled and microwaved mushrooms reached higher values of antioxidant activity.

“Frying and boiling treatments produced more severe losses in proteins and antioxidants compounds, probably due to the leaching of soluble substances in the water or in the oil, which may significantly influence the nutritional value of the final product” says Irene Roncero, one of the authors of the paper.

The advantages of grilling or microwave cooking

“When mushrooms were cooked by microwave or grill, the content of polyphenol and antioxidant activity increased significantly, and there are no significant losses in nutritional value of the cooked mushrooms” says Roncero.

The researcher clarifies that adding a little oil portion while grilling mushrooms is not a problem. “This minimal amount will not cause nutrient loses by leaching; in fact, the antioxidant capacity can be even improved. Moreover, if olive oil is used, the fatty acid profile of the final preparation is enhanced with barely increase in the calorie content.”

Roncero underlines that the cooking technique clearly influences the nutritional value and the antioxidant activity of mushrooms so that “the adequate selection of the culinary method is a key factor to preserve the nutritional profile of this highly consumed food.”

In this study the CTICH collaborated with the Estacion Experimental del Zaidın (CSIC, Granada) to analyze the antioxidant activity of the raw and cooked mushrooms.

Source: SINC

Video: How to Make Mosaic Sushi

モザイク寿司

Watch video at You Tube (1:00 minute) . . . . .

How to Make Perfect Crepes

Dana Cree wrote . . . . .

Most fundamental pastry techniques rely on indulgent amounts of butter and sugar. But with many of us are trying to catch our breath after a marathon of holiday eating, it seemed fitting to share the daintiest classic pastry I could find: the crepe.

A crepe is a handkerchief of a dessert made with a thin batter cooked directly on the surface of a pan. If you’re on the streets of Paris, your crepe will be made before your eyes, the batter spread circularly across the surface of a hot iron disk with what looks like a desktop-sand-garden rake that’s lost its teeth. As the batter is spread, the pan’s warm surface gently coagulates the batter.

At home, we make crepes in a non-stick skillet warmed gently over a stovetop. Instead of spreading the batter manually, we roll the pan circularly with our wrist, using gravity to move the batter around the surface. The motion takes some getting used to; even the most seasoned crepe makers know the first few to come out are tossed to the hounds as they rebuild muscle memory and tinker with the heat of the pan.

Because the heat from the pan coagulates the batter on contact, it is crucial to control the temperature of your pan. If it’s too hot, the batter will grab too quickly, and won’t have time to coat the pan before it’s set in place. Another bummer: the batter will bubble and boil on contact, filling your crepe with tiny holes and leaving the surface with a prune-finger appearance. If the pan isn’t warm enough, the batter will swirl and swirl before it sets, leaving your wrist aching and the crepe batter pooling anywhere gravity has time to move it. Ideally, the heat of the pan will be just warm enough that batter makes only one tour of the pan, setting as it passes, until the last of the batter just reaches the start of the crepe.

It takes some practice to get the hang of it, so don’t give up if your first attempts look like Pinterest fails. Most recipes will leave you with enough batter that you can make more than a few mistakes.

The batter itself is made from a lot of milk, a little flour, a couple eggs, and a touch of butter. If you’re making sweet crepes, you can add a touch of sweetness to the batter with sugar, or something more flavorful like honey or maple syrup. Crepes are also a wonderful place to experiment with flavorful flours. Simply swap out 10 to 20 percent of the all-purpose flour for buckwheat flour, teff flour, or any other that’s piqued your interest.

When flour is added to liquid, it must be added with intention. Because the flour will absorb water on contact, it has a tendency to form “fish-eyes”: small beads of dry flour encased in gluey wet flour. You might have seen this in a lumpy gravy, or when trying to mix cocoa powder into milk for a cup of hot cocoa. They are hard to break up once they form, and the risk increases as the ratio of liquid to flour rises.

The ratio of liquid to flour in crepes makes fish-eyes inevitable, and to combat this I mix the batter in a blender. The high speed of the sharp blades will make quick work of breaking up any fish-eyes that form. A whisk will do, if that’s what you have, but you’ll greatly benefit by passing the batter through a fine-mesh sieve, catching any lumps of flour left un-whisked.

Now, the most crucial part of making crepe batter is walking away. Letting the flour rest for up to forty-eight hours allows the flour to fully hydrate, so the starches completely swell and are ready to gelatinize into tenderness, instead of gumminess.

You can get away with an hour or two, and indeed many recipes call for that. However, in my experience, short-changing the resting period leaves me with crepes that are rubbery.

Once you have a stack of crepes at your side, you can fill them with just about anything you like. If you’re a Nutella fan, crepes are a wonderful vessel for a thin schmear of the stuff. (And if you add bananas and you can justify eating if for breakfast.) Classic fruit-and-whipped-cream stuffing can be upgraded by including diplomat cream instead, but the lightened pastry cream truly shines when layered to make the elegant and understated crepe cake. If you’re looking for a spectacle, you can attempt crepes suzette, the dessert that illuminates French dining rooms. An orange-y, boozy sauce is prepared in a shallow pan, and after the crepes are dipped in and folded into quarters, the entire pan is set on fire. The flambé swallows the last of the alcohol, and leaves behind a toasty flavor unattainable by any other means.

You can omit the sugar in the recipe and fill your crepes with savory fillings as well. Julia Child calls crepes “an attractive way to turn leftovers or simple ingredients into a nourishing main-course dish,” and indeed dedicates five pages in Mastering the Art of French Cooking to the savory side of this dessert. Crepes can be rolled around cooked fish or meat; lined up in a casserole; gently spread with béchamel or mornay sauce; then broiled until gratinéed. Or simply wrap the pancakes around soft scrambled eggs and chopped herbs for a light brunch.

With all the possibilities, don’t forget: nothing is quite as delicious as a warm crepe lightly spread with butter and consumed without circumstance.


Sweet Crepes Recipe

4 eggs
400 g milk
200 g all-purpose flour
75 g sugar
5 g salt
50 g melted butter

  1. Place the eggs, milk, flour, sugar, salt, and butter in the cup of a blender, making sure to add the flour after the liquid, to reduce the risk of it clinging to the sides of the cup. Turn the blender on high and blend the crepe batter for 1 minute. If you do see flour sticking to the sides of your blender, free it with a rubber spatula and blend until it disappears.
  2. If you’re using a whisk to mix your crepe batter, mix the flour with the eggs first, then add the milk bit by bit. You want to make a paste before you add the bulk of the liquid, reducing the risk of fish-eye clumps of flour. Once you see a “paste” form, add the remaining ingredients.
  3. If you have a fine-mesh strainer, pass the batter through it as added insurance, removing any tiny lumps that might be lurking. Place the batter in an airtight container and let it rest in the fridge for at least half a day. If you are pressed for time, a one-hour rest is mandatory, but the texture of your crepes will be greatly improved by more resting time.
  4. Prepare a crepe-making station at your stove. You’ll need a non-stick skillet, the newer the better. I recommend an 8-inch pan, which uses 2 ounces of batter to make a crepe. If yours is larger or smaller, adjust the amount of batter you add accordingly. On the counter, place a plate to capture the finished crepes, a pastry brush to apply melted butter to the pan, a small rubber spatula for loosening the crepe from the pan once cooked, and a ¼- cup measuring cup to portion the batter.
  5. Heat your crepe pan over low heat for a few minutes. You want to slowly bring the pan to temperature. It’s easier to increase the heat of the pan than it is to cool it down. Lightly brush the warmed pan with melted butter, then add your crepe batter in the center. Lift the pan with your dominant hand, then tip the far edge of the pan down slightly, watching the batter slide towards the edge. When the batter reaches the edge, begin swirling the pan by rotating only your wrist, clockwise or counterclockwise. The motion will move the batter around the pan, coating the bottom evenly with crepe batter.
  6. When the batter forms a thin skin over the bottom of the pan, place it back over the heat. Cook the crepe until it loses all shine and you can see that the batter is set all the way through, about 60­–90 seconds. Peek underneath the crepe to see that it has taken on a fawn-like brown color. At this point, you need to flip the crepe. Loosen the edges of the crepe from the pan with a rubber spatula, then pick the crepe up by pinching it between your thumb and forefinger. I need to use both hands to do this, and my fingers always cry out in protest early in the process, dropping crepes unintentionally until they adjust to the sharp heat from the cooking crepe.
  7. When you get a solid grip on the crepe, lift it and quickly flip it, cooking the second side of the crepe for 30 seconds, just enough to color it lightly and set the remaining batter. Slide the crepe out of the pan onto the prepared plate. If you’re stacking your crepes for use more than 1 hour later, lightly brush the crepes with butter to ensure they don’t stick.
  8. Make adjustments to the heat of your pan as necessary, before repeating this process with the remaining batter, or until you’ve made as many crepes as your patience will allow. Throw the dishes in the sink, butter yourself a warm crepe, and think of all the lovely things you can fill the fruits of your labor with.

Makes about 30–35 6-inch crepes


Savoury Crepes Recipe

4 eggs
450 g milk
200 g all-purpose flour
5 g salt
100 g melted butter

  1. Place the eggs, milk, flour, salt, and butter in the cup of a blender, making sure to add the flour after the liquid, to reduce the risk of it clinging to the sides of the cup. Turn the blender on high and blend the crepe batter for 1 minute. If you do see flour sticking to the sides of your blender, free it with a rubber spatula and blend until it disappears.
  2. If you’re using a whisk to mix your crepe batter, mix the flour with the eggs first, then add the milk bit by bit. You want to make a paste before you add the bulk of the liquid, reducing the risk of fish-eye clumps of flour. Once you see a “paste” form, add the remaining ingredients.
  3. If you have a fine-mesh strainer, pass the batter through it as added insurance, removing any tiny lumps that might be lurking. Place the batter in an airtight container and let it rest in the fridge for at least half a day. If you are pressed for time, a one-hour rest is mandatory, but the texture of your crepes will be greatly improved by more resting time.
  4. Prepare a crepe-making station at your stove. You’ll need a non-stick skillet, the newer the better. I recommend an 8-inch pan, which uses 2 ounces of batter to make a crepe. If yours is larger or smaller, adjust the amount of batter you add accordingly. On the counter, place a plate to capture the finished crepes, a pastry brush to apply melted butter to the pan, a small rubber spatula for loosening the crepe from the pan once cooked, and a ¼- cup measuring cup to portion the batter.
  5. Heat your crepe pan over low heat for a few minutes. You want to slowly bring the pan to temperature. It’s easier to increase the heat of the pan than it is to cool it down. Lightly brush the warmed pan with melted butter, then add your crepe batter in the center. Lift the pan with your dominant hand, then tip the far edge of the pan down slightly, watching the batter slide towards the edge. When the batter reaches the edge, begin swirling the pan by rotating only your wrist, clockwise or counterclockwise. The motion will move the batter around the pan, coating the bottom evenly with crepe batter.
  6. When the batter forms a thin skin over the bottom of the pan, place it back over the heat. Cook the crepe until it loses all shine and you can see that the batter is set all the way through, about 60­–90 seconds. Peek underneath the crepe to see that it has taken on a fawn-like brown color. At this point, you need to flip the crepe. Loosen the edges of the crepe from the pan with a rubber spatula, then pick the crepe up by pinching it between your thumb and forefinger. I need to use both hands to do this, and my fingers always cry out in protest early in the process, dropping crepes unintentionally until they adjust to the sharp heat from the cooking crepe.
  7. When you get a solid grip on the crepe, lift it and quickly flip it, cooking the second side of the crepe for 30 seconds, just enough to color it lightly and set the remaining batter. Slide the crepe out of the pan onto the prepared plate. If you’re stacking your crepes for use more than 1 hour later, lightly brush the crepes with butter to ensure they don’t stick.
  8. Make adjustments to the heat of your pan as necessary, before repeating this process with the remaining batter, or until you’ve made as many crepes as your patience will allow. Throw the dishes in the sink, butter yourself a warm crepe, and think of all the lovely things you can fill the fruits of your labor with.

Makes about 30–35 6-inch crepes

Source: Lucky Peach