Low-sugar Fruits


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Strawberries

Strawberries, like many other berries, are often high in fiber and contain very little sugar.

There are only about 8 grams (g) of sugar in eight medium-sized strawberries. They are also a good source of vitamin C.

Peaches

Although they taste sweet, a medium sized peach only contains around 13 g of sugar.

Blackberries

Like strawberries, these berries also contain between 4 and 5 g of sugar, 5.3 g of fiber, and 1.39 g of protein per 100 g.

They are also a good source of antioxidants.

It is interesting to note that blueberries contain around double the amount of sugar as blackberries.

Lemons and limes

Not many people would pick up a lemon or lime to eat as a snack. However, with no more than 2 g of sugar per fruit and high levels of vitamin C, these are a great addition to a person’s diet.

People can squeeze a lemon or lime into sparkling water to replace other sugary carbonated beverages, or even squeeze lemon juice over a salad instead of using a salad dressing.

Honeydew melon

A popular summer snack, a slice of honeydew melon contains around 11 grams of digestible sugar.

Honeydew melon also contains potassium, vitamin C, and iron.

Oranges

A medium-sized orange has around 14 g of digestible sugar and is also an excellent source of vitamin C.

Orange juice and all other fruit juices bought from the supermarket may contain added sugars. If a person wants to limit their sugar intake, it is usually better to eat the fruit itself rather than drink its juice.

Grapefruit

This low-sugar fruit is a favorite breakfast food.

Half a medium-sized grapefruit contains around 11 g of sugar. If a person finds grapefruit too sharp, they may wish to drizzle a small amount of honey or sprinkle Stevia on top.

Avocados

Avocados are almost sugar-free. They are also a good source of healthful fats and fiber.

Source: Medical News Today

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Tips to Add Fruits and Veggies to Your Breakfasts

Fruit fits easily into breakfast, but vegetables can be a challenge. Here are some tips to help you wake up your kid’s fruit and vegetable appetite:

  • Stir things up. For a quick breakfast, add raisins or chopped dates to instant oatmeal, or stir blueberries, strawberries or sliced banana into whole-grain cereal with fat-free milk.
  • Get scrambling! Add fresh or frozen chopped spinach, mushrooms and diced tomatoes to scrambled eggs or omelets. Really, any veggies will work!
  • Make a breakfast sandwich. Top a whole-wheat English muffin with either reduced-fat peanut butter and banana slices, or hummus, sliced cucumbers, tomato and fresh spinach.
  • Batter up. Add grated carrots or zucchini to pancake, quick bread or muffin batter.
  • Drink your produce. Whir carrots and fresh orange juice in a blender for a refreshing breakfast beverage.
  • Say “Olé!” Make a breakfast burrito by wrapping low-fat cheddar cheese, scrambled eggs and diced bell peppers in a whole-wheat tortilla. You also can make a vegetable-and-cheese quesadilla in a nonstick pan with a scant amount of canola oil.
  • Pick a fruit pizza. Spread reduced-fat dinner rolls in a pizza pan and bake. Top the pizza with orange sections or slices of kiwi, apples or strawberries, and drizzle fat-free vanilla yogurt over the top.
  • Make a quick white or sweet potato hash. Grate the potatoes—they cook faster that way. Place the potatoes in a glass bowl and microwave about three minutes or until hot; drain any juice. Heat a skillet or frying pan on the stove and then stir-fry the potatoes with a teaspoon of olive oil until crispy.

Source: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

New Sweets – Donuts with Fruits and Vegetables

Limited-time offer by Mister Donut in Japan

Soy milk cream whipped with vegetable and fruit is sandwiched between donuts made with flour mixed with vegetable powders of red, yellow and green colours respectively. The size of the new donut is smaller than the current donuts. Its diameter is about 5 cm.

Strawberry and Tomato

Apple and Carrot

Pineapple and Spinach

Is Sugar From Fruit The Same As Sugar From Candy?

Natalie Jacewicz wrote . . . . . . .

If vegetables are the monarchs of nutritious eating, fruits have always been part of the royal court — not quite as important, but still worthy of respect. But now that nutrition guidelines are cracking down on sugar, some people are questioning fruits’ estimable role in a healthy diet.

One need only go to Twitter to see the confusion. “Pilates instructor started talkin about how fruit has so much sugar and a banana has the same as a Snickers bar,” reads one tweet. Other users come to fruit’s rescue: “Fruit sugar and sugar in processed foods is not the same thing,” one user explains.

Sugar in fruit and added sugar are not the same thing, says Lauri Wright, a nutritionist, public health specialist and spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

“There’s so much confusion,” Wright says. “I think this comes from the idea we’ve had for some time now that all carbs are bad, and that’s not the case. Carbs are required for energy.”

There are lots of kinds of sugar. Fruits have fructose, glucose and a combination of the two called “sucrose,” or “table sugar.” But the sugars in fruit are packed less densely than in a candy bar, according to Elvira Isganaitis, a pediatric endocrinologist at Joslin Diabetes Center and a Harvard Medical School instructor. This difference is important for people with diabetes, a disorder which interferes with regulating sugar in the blood. When people eat something sweet, they usually have a spike in blood sugar levels. Then the spike plateaus and the amount of sugar in the blood eventually drops back to normal. Fruits generally cause a lower spike than sweets, Isganaitis says, making it less dangerous for people with diabetes monitoring their sugar levels.

But even for people without diabetes, sugar in fruit is a healthier option than sugar from other sources, according to nutritionist Wright. A can of soda, for example, has about 40 grams of sugar. “And what else are you getting with that?” Wright asks. “You’re getting no protein, no minerals and no fiber. You get nothing but the sugar and the calories.”

A serving of fruit, by contrast, usually contains no more than 20 grams of sugar, has fiber and has nutrients like vitamin C. As Wright puts it: “You’re getting a lot of bang for your buck.” And fiber and lower sugar amounts can also decrease sugar spikes in blood levels.

That doesn’t mean there aren’t possible pitfalls for fruit freaks. Dried fruits, Wright says, tend to pack more sugar into a bite because they’re so concentrated. She advises people with diabetes in particular to consume dried favorites with caution.

Both Wright and Isganaitis also warn that smoothies can commit sugar sabotage. That goes for juices, too. “I have a little bit of a bee in my bonnet about fruit juices, because they really masquerade as a health food,” says Isganaitis, “but you can get a whopping dose of glucose [and calories].” She advises that people eat whole foods, including fruits, and steer clear of processed foods, especially those sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup, concentrated apple juice, or the like.

Similarly, Wright advises smoothie lovers make smoothies at home and throw in some vegetables.

Wright says she hopes people with diabetes in particular are not frightened off fruit by warnings about added sugar in other types of food. As for herself, Wright frequently eats fruit at her home in Florida: “I live in the Sunshine State, and you may think my favorite is oranges, but actually, we have wonderful blueberries.”

Source: npr

Infographic: Eat More Colour

Celebrating the National Month of Fruits and Vegetables in June

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Source: American Heat Association