What’s for Dinner?

Home-cooked Japanese Dinner

The Menu

  • Boiled Flounder with Seaweed and Japanese Green
  • Variety of Pickles
  • Miso Soup with Eggplant and Fried-tofu
  • Cooked Rice
Advertisements

What’s for Lunch?

Japanese Lunch at Tatenosouhonten (館乃総本店) in Nagazaike, Japan

The Menu

Tempura pumpkin, snap pea, shrimp, and fresh onion

Grilled Japanese mackerel and bamboo shoot

Udon

Dessert – Coffee jelly, cherry wagashi, cherry roll cake and strawberry

What’s for Lunch?

Tempura Shrimp Rice Bowl Set Lunch at a Tenya (天丼てんや) Store in Tokyo, Japan

The price of the Cherry Blossom Set with rice bowl, soba and soup is 1,080 yen (tax included).

In Pictures: Food of Sen Sakana in New York City, U.S.A.

Nikkei Cuisine – Japanese-Peruvian Food

The Restaurant

Video: Making Mochi Desserts at Morimoto with Master Pastry Chef Natsume Aoi

Mochi — pounded sticky rice — is most commonly seen in the US filled with ice cream and sold in the freezer section of a grocery store chain. Creating the traditional Japanese confectionary is a laborious process that many chefs rather not tackle; but pastry chef Natsume Aoi can’t imagine doing a menu without it. “I think I’m one of the few that would even attempt to do a hand-wrapped mochi [in a restaurant] where we can seat 400 capacity in two runs,” jokes Aoi, the pastry chef at New York’s high-volume Morimoto. “It’s not the smartest move to make.”

Still, for Aoi, having mochi on her menu — even one adapted to the western palate — is something that brings her closer to home. “Every restaurant that I have ever worked at, as long as I’m in a position to bring something to the menu, it will always be something that’s personal,” she explains. “I’m pretty far away from home and I need to have a way to bring that with me.”

Watch video at You Tube (6:57 minutes) . . . . .