Velvety Hearty Seafood Soup with Classic Flavour

Ingredients

1 tbsp butter
2 stalks celery, chopped
1 onion, chopped
1 bay leaf
1 tsp dried dill or thyme
salt and pepper
2 large potatoes, peeled and diced
2 cups water or fish stock
1/3 cup all-purpose flour
3 cups mlk
2 cups cooked seafood (fish, shrimp, lobster, scallops, crab, clams, oysters)
2 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice
whole grain crackers, crumbled

Method

  1. In a large pot, melt butter over medium heat. Saute celery, onion, bay leaf, dill, 1/2 tsp salt and 1/4 tsp pepper for about 5 minutes or until onions start to brown.
  2. Stir in potatoes and saute for 2 minutes.
  3. Increase heat to medium-high, stir in water and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to medium and boil for about 5 minutes or until potatoes are almost tender.
  4. Whisk flour into milk and stir into pot. Bring to a simmer, stirring often. Stir in seafood. Simmer, stirring often, for 5 minutes or until the seafood is hot. Discard bay leaf. Stir in lemon juice and season to taste with salt and pepper. Ladle into bowls and top each serving with crumbled crackers.

Makes 4 to 6 servings.

Source: Dairy Farmers of Manitoba

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Chinese Hakka-style Stuffed Bitter Melon

Ingredients

3 bitter melon (about 600 g)
200 g unseasoned ground dace meat
80 g ground pork
10 g Chinese salted fish
600 g amaranth greens (莧菜)
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp ground white pepper
1/2 tsp sugar
1 cup chicken (or fish) broth

Method

  1. Cut the bitter melon in sections, clean out the seeds and rind.
  2. Cut off most of the stems from the amaranth greens, leaving only leaves and tender stems. Wash, blanch, chop and squeeze dry when cooled.
  3. Steam the salted fish for 3 minutes, de-bone and mash into paste.
  4. Put dace meat in a large bowl, add salt, sugar, white pepper and 1 tablespoon water, stir with chop sticks in one direction until gluey, then mix in minced pork, salted fish paste and amaranth greens to form the stuffing.
  5. Fill each section of bitter melon with stuffing. Put stuffed melon into a pot with stuffing facing up. Add chicken broth to cover the melon completely.
  6. Cover and bring to a boil, then cook in low heat for 25 to 30 minutes.
  7. Serve the stuffed melon with the soup.

Source: Hakka Cuisine


Steamed Fish Fillet Marinated with Orange, Ginger and Onion

Ingredients

4 large whitefish fillets, skinned (about 6 oz each)
juice and zest of 1/2 medium orange
1/2-inch piece fresh ginger, grated
2 garlic cloves, crushed
4 green onions, shredded
1 medium orange, segmented
4 Tbsp dry white wine
2 Tbsp butter
1 Tbsp fresh chives, chopped

Method

  1. Rinse the fish under running water and pat dry. Place in a shallow glass dish. Mix half of the orange juice and zest, the ginger, garlic, green onions and half of the orange segments in the dish. Cover and marinate for 1 hour, turning occasionally.
  2. Remove the fish, orange and scallions from the dish, reserving the marinade, and place in a wax paper-lined steamer tier. Cover with a tight-fitting lid and steam for 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, pour the marinade into a small saucepan with the remaining orange juice, zest and the wine. Bring to a boil and boil rapidly for 2 to 3 minutes to reduce. Remove from the heat. Stir in the butter to give a glossy sauce and add the chives.
  4. Serve the fish on warm plates with the sauce. Garnish with fresh chives and orange segments and serve with freshly cooked rice.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Steam Cuisine

Mediterranean-style Baked Whole Fish with Herb and Salt

Ingredients

2 red big eye fishes, about 1 lb each
3 to 4 sprigs rosemary
800 g coarse sea salt
2 egg white
2 to 3 tsp lemon juice

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200ºC.
  2. Clean and pat dry the fishes. Set aside.
  3. Strip the rosemary leaves and place in a bowl.
  4. Add salt and egg white. Mix well and set aside.
  5. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Spread half of the salt mixture on top.
  6. Place the fishes on top of the salt mixture. Cover them with the remaining herbal salt.
  7. Bake fishes in the oven for 20 minutes.
  8. Remove the salt crust and drizzle lemon juice over fishes before serving.

Source: Hong Kong magazine

Malaysian-style Fish Curry in Coconut Sauce

Ingredients

1-1/4 pounds monkfish or other firm-textured fish fillets, skinned and cut into 1-inch cubes
1/2 teaspoon salt
2/3 cup shredded coconut
6 shallots or small onions, roughly chopped
6 blanched almonds
2-3 garlic cloves, roughly chopped
1-inch piece fresh ginger root, peeled and sliced
2 lemongrass stalks, trimmed
2 teaspoons ground turmeric
3 tablespoons vegetable oil
1-3/4 cups canned coconut milk
1-3 fresh chilies, seeded and sliced
salt and ground white pepper
fresh chives, to garnish
boiled rice, to serve

Method

  1. Spread out the pieces of fish in a shallow dish and sprinkle them with the salt.
  2. Dry fry the coconut in a wok or large frying pan over medium to low heat, turning all the time until it is crisp and golden (see Cook’s Tip).
  3. Transfer the coconut to a food processor and process to an oily paste. Scrape into a bowl and reserve.
  4. Add the shallots or onions, almonds, garlic and ginger to the food processor. Cut off the lower 2 inches of the lemongrass stalks, chop them roughly and add to the processor. Process the mixture to a paste.
  5. Add the turmeric to the mixture in the processor and process briefly to mix. Bruise the remaining and set the stalks aside.
  6. Heat the oil in a wok. Add the onion mixture and cook for a few minutes without browning. Stir in the coconut milk and bring to a boil, stirring constantly to prevent curdling.
  7. Add the cubes of fish, most of the sliced chili and the bruised lemongrass stalks. Cook for 3-4 minutes.
  8. Stir in the coconut paste (moistened with some of the sauce if necessary) and cook for a further 2-3 minutes only. Do not overcook the fish. Taste and adjust the seasoning.
  9. Remove the lemongrass. Transfer to a hot serving dish and sprinkle with the remaining slices of chili. Garnish with chopped and whole chives and serve with boiled rice.

Cook’s Tip

Dry frying is a feature of Malay cooking. When dry frying do not be distracted. The coconut must be constantly on the move so that it becomes crisp and of a uniform golden colour.

Makes 4 servings.

Source: Asian Cooking